What Causes Ovarian Cysts After Menopause

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst??
    hi im 17 years old and I believe that I have a ovarian cyst. I have all of the symptoms of it and Im going to the doctor next week. but I just want to ask a few questions first. can being overweight cause ovarian cyst? what can cause ovarian cyst? also, can an ovarian cyst make you infertile?? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      No, ovarian cysts are not caused by being overweight. I'm not overweight at all, infact think I'm a bit under weight and I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 9 years. I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as cysts usually do resolve on their own after a few cycles).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in and can occur in any women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving or make you infertile, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you see a gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    what age is it common to get a cyst that does not want to go away on its own?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause (basically any woman can get ovarian cysts at any time), when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  3. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts?
    Hi everyone. I was diagnosed a few years ago with ovarian cysts, and I had the ultrasounds and all that jazz, but they went away. Now I'm having the same kinds of pains in my lower stomach (a lot of the time), mostly on my left side. My doctor told me last time that she didn't really see anything (back in Oct.) Is it possible that they're back? Or that they come and go as usual, but for some reason they're really painful for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations.

      Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you still experience pain that you go back to your OB/Gyn and let her know as there might be something else that could be causing this.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      Good luck :)

  4. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    what are they? and umm how do you know if you have them???

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  5. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts?
    Could someone please tell me what some of the symptoms of ovarian cysts are?
    I think I have them... and I know it says that sometimes there is no symptoms at all but there can be.
    So I know some... but if any of you ladies out there ever had this let me know what it felt like for you and how the doc. finds out and how they are treated, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you see a gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  6. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst?
    enlarged ovary w/cyst containing internal debris thick wall - irregular borders - positive peripheral color doppler

    Is this typical for a "corpus Luteum cyst?" Or, another type?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are sacs filled with fluid or a semisolid material that develops on or within the ovary.

      Alternative Names:
      Physiologic ovarian cysts; Functional ovarian cysts

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and disappear on their own. During the days preceding ovulation, a follicle grows. At the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to rupture and release an egg.

      Instead of being reabsorbed, the fluid within the follicle persists and forms a cyst. Functional cysts usually disappear within 60 days without treatment and are relatively common. They occur most often during childbearing years (puberty to menopause), but may occur at any time. No known risk factors have been identified.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not to be confused with other disease conditions involving ovarian cysts, specifically benign cysts of different types that must be treated to resolve, true ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer), or hormonal conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease.

  7. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    about six months ago my 17 yr old daughter , was dx with ovarian cysts a 4 cm on the right side and small ones wich is normal on the left one, well she did the birth control thing she still is on those we have did the high dose small dose and in between wich is also normal to try to find the right one for her, well the 4cm went down to a normal size and the left side ones also went away , my question is she still has lots of pain yes controlled with pain meds if gets too bad and advil if minor, well now left side is hurting worse then right side , called doc they said she prob ovulating, well that should be over now and still pain, so here it is how long should I wait to see if birth control going to work to control cysts? and should I sternly ask for a ultrasound to see if she has a cyst on her left side ? not worried about smaller cysts those are normal and should not be causing this pain. BTW doc said she prob started getting cysts at a young age and just never noticed them before.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if your daughter is in severe pain that you take her back to the doctor or to the ER at the hospital, they will be able to do another ultrasound. I would recommend that you ask your doctor/gyno any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  8. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst...?
    I had a cat scan and they detected a small ovarian cyst. They didn't give me any medicine for it or anything. They aren't going to check up on it either to see if it went away. Is that normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will usually resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      I wouldn't worry too much about the cyst if it's very small and they did not seem to concerned with it, however I would recommend you go back to your referring doctor or gynaecologist to discuss your concerns with him/her.

      I have suffered from numerous bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 9 years and although most of them have resolved on their own, I have had to have surgery for some of them too as they continued to grow and was causing too much pain.

      Each woman's own situation is different, so I would really recommend speaking with the doctor that referred you to have the cat scan.

      Good luck :)

  9. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst?
    my dr visualized a 3.57cm cyst on my right ovary. she said she didnt think it was anything bad but is sending me for a CT of the abdomen and pelvis. i'm 21 y/o. isn't that kinda big? at what size does it need to be removed? thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Functional ovarian cysts usually go away without treatment. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimeters and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery), however in your case it might depend on whether you are experiencing any pain or discomfort because if you aren't, then your doctor may just want to "wait" to see whether it resolves on it's own.

      I would recommend that you speak with your doctor/gyno about this and ask her to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 9 years and have had surgery 2 times to have them removed because they were big in size (7cm and over 5cm) which caused me a lot of pain.

      I hope this helps ease your mind a little bit. Good luck :)

  10. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    has anyone had these and what were your symptoms..how bad was the pain

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns or think that you might have ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you see a gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  11. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts...?
    I've been having pain on my right side for a few months and finally asked my doctor about it...she scheduled me for an ultrasound which I had a couple days ago. My doctor just called and said that they saw that my right ovary was enlarged and they saw a lot of follicles (?) that they said were probably a bunch of ovarian cysts. They want to do another ultrasound in 6 weeks...I'm really scared...What does this mean? If they are all cysts, what do they do? And what does that mean for me? Will I have problems getting pregnant?? My doctor didn't really help so I have no idea where to ask these questions...I'm scared. =

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you speak to your doctor and ask her for a referal to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  12. QUESTION:
    wht causes ovarian cysts in the body? Any prevention?
    so what next,if one is diagonised with one?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary. Functional ovarian cysts cannot be prevented if you are ovulating. Anything that makes ovulation less frequent reduces your chance of developing an ovarian cyst. Birth control pills, pregnancy, and breast-feeding in the first 6 months following birth prevent ovulation. Ovulation ceases when menopause is complete. Women who use high-dose birth control pills have a modestly decreased risk of developing functional ovarian cysts; low-dose birth control pills seem to have a less preventive effect.

  13. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst question.....????????
    What do doctors do about an ovarian cyst if one is found?
    Surgery? Medicines? Just curious.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  14. QUESTION:
    what is an ovarian cyst?
    what are they? how do you get them? are they dangerous? how can you tell if you have them?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns or think that you might have ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you see a gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  15. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst.......?
    I think my cysts are back for the second time, but i'm not sure. I have these symptoms..
    -Irregular period (50 day cycle)
    -i always get really bad cramps (even when im not on my period)
    -breasts tenderness
    -i pee a lot
    -lower back pain
    -nausea
    and my left ovary hurts all the time

    • ANSWER:
      If you have pain in your ovary area (this is the area you seem to be describing in your question), then you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced the same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst.

      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding this pain you are experiencing, that you consult with your doctor/gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  16. QUESTION:
    Is there a permanent cure to ovarian cysts?
    I seem to keep getting ovarian cysts (I have had two that have caused serious problems in the last four months). Is there a cure for this that doesn't involve surgery? My mom wants me to get my ovary removed so that they can't grow there but that seems really drastic to me.

    • ANSWER:
      Removing your ovary to prevent ovarian cysts is like deciding that to prevent a sprained ankle, you should have your leg amputated. Someone who gets one ovary removed at your age risks a lot of things--mortality rate decreases almost 2x, and you'll go through menopause early, and you might even have slight fertility problems. And that could still mean that you have ovarian cyst problems in your other ovary. So you're right, it's drastic to remove your ovary. It's replacing one problem with another problem. However, one way to decrease incidence of ovarian cysts is to go on birth control pills. I'm not sure why your doc hasn't recommended that yet, but it makes a lot of sense.

  17. QUESTION:
    what causes ovarian cyst? i research but they explain it difficultly. whats the easiest deffinition: i read &?
    what it sound like is ovulating not function ing right and or tryin get pregnant but fails causes ovarian cysts? is that right long story short

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  18. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts???? HELPP?
    so im pretty sure i have ovarian cysts i have a dull ache on both sides of my abdominal area and its not like a killing pain but i can definatel feel it and it comes off and on ive also felt some aching in my lower back and vaginal area but just ocassionally ive also kind of felt a little dizzy and had slight head aches from time to time are those symptoms of ovarian cysts?? i went to my doctor and everything and we scheduled a pelvic ultrasound oh yeah ive had some slight pelvis pain as well helppp meeee!! does it sound like cysts to you??

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      It does sound to me like you could have an ovarian cyst, I have experienced the same type of symptoms you are describing except for the dizzy feeling, however the only way to know for sure is to find out by having an ultrasound (which you're having soon). I would recommend that if you do have an ovarian cyst, that you ask your doctor/gynaecologist lots of questions with regards to it, such as what type of cyst is is, is it a simple cyst (such a as functional (fluid-filled) cyst) or a complex cyst (such as hemmorhagic cyst)? As your doctor/gyno how big it is and what they would recommend such as waiting to see whether it resolve on it's own within a few cycles, whether your doctor/gyno may recommend you take the pill for a couple of months to see whether that helps resolve the cyst or whether you may need to have the cyst surgically (laparoscopy) drained/removed.

      Good luck :)

  19. QUESTION:
    what is ovarian cyst?
    what causes ovearian cyst ?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  20. QUESTION:
    do i have an ovarian cyst?
    last night right after i had sex with my boyfriend i started experiencing severe nausea, cold sweat extreme cramping, its as if someone stabbed me in the uterus, it hurts soo bad to even walk, then sometimes the pain goes to my rectum,im also anemic, and i feel extremely weak my bf seems to think that i might have an ovarian cyst. but i dont know what it is

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse (which is a symptom I have experience myself a number of times) or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding this pain you are experiencing, that you consult with your doctor/gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  21. QUESTION:
    Signs of Ovarian Cysts?
    My mom had cysts on her overies and I think I may have one. What are the signs?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno so they can do an ultrasound to have a look at your ovaries and you can ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  22. QUESTION:
    question about ovarian cysts...?
    i know i have them.

    but sometimes when i feel the pain strike in my ovary. it also strikes at the same time kinda up higher in my stomach/chest

    im not quite sure where.

    but its really weird.

    i feel it at the same time
    and it feels like the pain is connected by a string or something.

    anyone else ever feel this?

    or know what it is?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations.

      Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  23. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts ? ? ? Info ? ? ?
    What is an ovarian cyst?
    What causes them?

    I have one and am waiting to see my doctor about how big etc but is going to be next week as only just had the scans

    What is going to happen to me?
    I've heard things about not having children, is this true? What are the odds of me having children? etc?

    Any other info would be greatly appreciated! THANK YOU!
    I ignored the pain for over 6 months now :/
    Periods have been a bit early or late, heavier or lighter over the last 4 months
    Also have pain during and after sex, so if anyone knows anything to help that pain please inform me as its very annoying for my partner and i! :)

    • ANSWER:
      There is different types of ovarian cysts but basically it is part of your egg etc, Google it. They are caused by your hormones and they could come and go each month until you reach the menopause and yes it can make it harder for you to conceive - my daughter has cysts in both ovaries that cause pain for a day or so when she is ovulating and was told it will be very hard to impossible to have any kids but she already has 2 and doesn't want anymore, the pill is the only thing that might cure the cysts as it balances out the hormones, but the pill causes headaches in my daughter but doctor recommended that she take the pill again for a few months in the hope it will balance out the hormones forever

  24. QUESTION:
    What exactly is an ovarian cyst?
    and what causes them? are they easy to get rid of?
    do guys get cysts any where on their body?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  25. QUESTION:
    What is an ovarian cyst?
    I'm just wondering, and is it common among 13-15 year old girls?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  26. QUESTION:
    what is an ovarian cyst???
    izi dangerous nd how do u get it???

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  27. QUESTION:
    What exactly is an ovarian cyst?
    please explain to me what it is, i just know it causes pain
    egg? this is for my friend, she's a virgin. ^_^
    thanks, and yeah, i figured out the cyst on ur ovary part, i meant like what exactly are they, what causes them and all. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  28. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst Is This Possible?
    If you have an ovarian cyst then do you have to get a historectome??? Or can they laser it out? Loths of info please. will chosse best answer.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious) and I still have both my ovaries and my uterus.

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  29. QUESTION:
    Question about ovarian cysts??
    ok so im a teenager and i started by period about 2 and a half years ago and ive been having lower abdominal pain for about 3 weeks and it alternates from side to side and sometimes i feel pelvic pain and well as lower back pain so i went to the doctor and she said its nothing to worry about its probably just constipation or ovarian cysts and i have a feeling its cysts but i was just wondering if it is cysts will this be a problem i will have to deal with for a while the pain and stuff?? oh yeah and do you think it could be ovarian cancer??? im only about 15??? helppp???

    thanks
    its not like ive ever been doubled over in pain but most of the time its like a dull ache

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts can lead to numerous typical symptoms such as:

      * Irregular menstrual cycles
      * A constant or intermittent dull ache in the pelvic area
      * Pain the in the pelvis shortly before the menstrual cycles begins and ends
      * Pain in the pelvis during intercourse
      * Nausea, breast tenderness and vomiting
      * Heaviness or fullness in the abdomen
      * Pressure on the rectum or bladder

      But for a lot of women (in fact it is thought that up to 70% of women may have ovarian cysts) they are asymptomatic (that is, they do not cause any symptoms).

      When they cause so much discomfort that you cannot live with them it may be suggested that if an ovarian cysts seems not to 'go away' (as they sometimes do) you might undergo surgery such as a Cystectomy (where they remove the cyst only) or in more extreme cases where an ovary is badly encysted - Oophorectomy - the removal of the ovary.

      Naturally an Oophorectomy may affect fertility, although with a single ovary you will still produce eggs and hormones needed for maintaining a monthly cycle. But if both ovaries are removed due to cyst problems (such as happened to someone I know when she was 38) you are thrown full tilt into menopause, and it can be a difficult thing to cope with.

      Some resources suggest that you might encourage the natural process of ovarian cysts diminishing, and shrinking to nothing through adopting some key strategies and some lifestyle changes. I feel it is preferable to surgery or drugs if appropriate for your case. This is well worth considering if there is still an option to avoid surgery and you feel you can give a natural remedy a chance to work. In depth details are outlined here:
      http://www.happytorecommend.com/ovarian-cyst-cure/

  30. QUESTION:
    Pathological Ovarian Cyst at 16?
    I was recently diagnosed with a pathological ovarian cyst at 6cm. On Monday, Im very worried what it can do and what are the chances of it being cancerous? The person who diagnosed it said nothing to worry about but will have to have an appointment with my GP for another scan. Since friday i have suffered vomiting, feeling sick, loss of appetite, being hungry but not wanting anything to eat and im all a little worried :( Help?

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops on a woman s ovary. Ovarian cysts are very common and they do not usually cause any symptoms.

      In most cases, they are harmless and usually disappear without the need for treatment.

      However, if the cyst is large or is causing symptoms, it will probably have to be surgically removed.

      Ovarian cysts can affect women of any age.

      Pathological ovarian cysts are much less common and occur as the result of abnormal cell growth (most pathological ovarian cysts are not cancerous).

      Ovarian cysts are very common. It is estimated that virtually all women who still have a monthly period, and 1 in 5 women who have been through the menopause, will have one or more ovarian cysts.

      Ovarian cysts that cause symptoms are much less common, affecting only 1 in every 25 women at some point in their life.

      I do not think the other symptoms are connected, but, there are many causes for the symptoms you describe and without examining you and asking questions it is impossible to give any form of diagnosis.

      You need to see your doctor again, he alone can do the necessary tests to determine it s cause and cure. Although the people on Answers mean well, only your doctor has the training and experience necessary to cure you. The sooner you consult him/her the sooner you will be back to normal.

  31. QUESTION:
    Can a Cyst On ur Ovaries Cause u To Miss Period?

    No, i'm not pregnant. Just took a test yesterday, thank you very much. And i know all the symptoms of pregnancy. I've been pregnant 5 times. So no, I'M NOT PREGNANT.

    • ANSWER:
      Occasionally ovarian cysts do cause irregular periods, particularly in a condition called PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) in which the hormonal system that regulates the ovaries is disturbed, causing them to form a large number of cysts. More frequently, however, menstrual irregularities are due to other conditions, such as pregnancy, menopause, or thyroid problems.

      If you think that you might have a ovarian cyst, I would recommend you speak with your doctor or gyneacologist for further evaluation to see what they say could be causing this.

      Good luck :)

  32. QUESTION:
    How does one get rid of ovarian cysts naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  33. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts? Please help!!?
    I recently found out that I have a cyst in my left uterus when my brother took me to a hospital for experiencing severe pain on my abdomen. The pain occurs every first day of my menstruation. The doctor said that it measures 3 cm. I was so shocked and upset when I found out about it. My doctor said that I have to take pills for three months and return to her after 3 full months to check if the cyst will be gone. She even said that it causes infertility, and that really upset me since my boyfriend and I are planning to be married this year and have children. I want to know what are the other risks involving this kind of cyst and if there's a chance that I can get pregnant. Thank you! Your answers will be a great help for me.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 11 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon/gynaecologist (perhaps even get a second opinion), who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cyst that you speak to your doctor and ask him/her for a referral to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Your doctor isn't wrong in prescribing the pill for you as it is said that birth control pills can shrink ovarian cysts, which could be what might happen in your case. It is very common for simple ovarian cysts to go away on their own after a few cycles.

      Good luck :)

  34. QUESTION:
    What to expect with Ovarian Cyst?
    I just went to a family practice Dr. (not my normal OB/GYN) for what I thought was a bladder infection. Turns out I have an ovarian cyst on my right ovary. I am going in for an unltra-sound on Wednesday. Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What should I expect as far as care/treatment? What are the chances it is cancerous? A bit worried about the future and confused as to what to expect, any info you have to offer is greatly appreciated.
    I had an ultra-sound today, the cyst is an inch in diameter and fluid filled. They called it a simple cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss your options with your doctor/OB/Gyn and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I'm currently using birth control pills to treat and try to prevent my ovarian cysts from recurring, however I have a simple cyst that is 3.2cm at the moment, meaning that the birth control pills does not always help to stop cysts from coming back.

      If you have any other questions, you can email me - the link to my email is in my profile. I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  35. QUESTION:
    Are ovarian cysts common in teens?
    If so, what are the symptoms you have one?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  36. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts and high levels of dht?
    I have ovarian cysts they have been there for 9 years. For the past 3 years my hair has been falling out and thinning. My scalp since the past year has been really itchy. I have high levels of dht on my scalp. Is this caused by the cysts?
    I also have missed my last period. (not pregnant no sex for 3 years)

    • ANSWER:
      dear friend,
      Have you got checked up for ovarian cysts.
      You should know whether they are malignant or not.
      Biopsy will help to know that.
      I think you have to undergo surgery of removal of Ovary.

      Your scalp problems like falling of hair and itching have to be dealt by the dermatologist.
      I think you are entering in to menopause .

      During menopause you may face different uneasy feeling because hormonal imbalance.
      You also may need to take E vitamin.

      A gynecologist will help you for all above .

  37. QUESTION:
    Information on Ovarian Cysts...?
    I have several ovarian cysts on my right side, all quite small, and 1 abnormally large on my left. One recently ruptured on my right side and caused me severe pain. I saw several doctors and went to 2 different hospitals b4 i finally found out what had happened. I just want to prevent this from happening again, and I want to be more prepared.
    Are there any precautions I can take? and is it true that I may have fertility issues? i want kids, but i don't want to bring children into this world if they are going to have any sort of mental disability, i don't think it's fair. finally if there are any physical restrictions i should be aware of, it would be a great help! or if there is anything additional, please add it, all help is great!
    Thanks soooo much!

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 11 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your future pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you speak to your doctor and ask her for a referral to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  38. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst!!! Driving me crazy!!! :(?
    Well I went into the hospital last night... I have swollen and tender nipples... Diarrhea... menstrual like cramps mainly on the right side.. I also had a little pink spot on Saturday..I have frequent urination... and my period is late.. (11/24)..{all of this has been going on since Friday night} I went to the hospital because I thought that it was my appendix .. I got a cat scan and they found out that I had a ovarian cyst on my left ovary (2cmX4cm) ((6cm is considered large))... (the appendix and everything else in fine) So they said that my symptoms did not have anything to do with the cyst! =( Has anyone ever had and ovarian cyst with these symptoms.... I still have all the symptoms.. All the hospital did was send me home and told me to follow up with my doctor!!!!!!! I dont know what to do.... Does this make me infertile, would this cause my period to be late... any advise?!!!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Your cyst definitely explains why you had the ovulation cramping you experienced for a while after your ovulation. Your ovarian cyst could also explain why you have missed your period.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I too have experienced nausea and breast tenderness whenever I have had an ovarian cyst and they do drive you crazy, especially with the pain you feel around your ovary.

      A functional ovarian cyst probably will not give you problems conceiving or leave you infertile, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cyst and because of your symptoms, that you speak to your doctor and ask him/her for a referral to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  39. QUESTION:
    Painful Ovarian cysts?
    I have one ovary left, the other was removed due to cysts causing a lot of pain. My doctor suggested removing them both, but I am not ready for menopause so I declined.
    I didn't realize how much the ones on my other ovary hurt until she removed the other ( 3 years ago) Now, i can't stand it. I have the typical symptoms, abdominal pain, bloating, dizziness, nausea, etc.
    Can't they just remove the cyst without removing the ovary??? I am still not ready for menopause, I'm only 42. But the pain can really be unbearable.
    Any suggestions or advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Grr. I wrote a whole long answer and then it didn't save. In short: Yes, docs can probably save your ovary. Requires skill. Clearly your current doc feels uncomfortable doing it. Find a new one, preferably in a large teaching hospital.

      But even if you just get the cysts removed, you'll get new ones--sounds like you're prone to them. So can you take birth control pills. They eliminate ovarian activity so you don't get cysts. good compromise

  40. QUESTION:
    If you have an ovarian cyst...?
    Can It delay a person's growth, and when I say growth I mean getting taller, if the patient is 14?
    also if once the cyst is removed or goes away, will you grow the inches you didn't while the cyst was there?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I am not aware of ovarian cysts delaying a woman's growth and stop you from growing.

      I would recommend if you have an ovarian cyst or think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with a doctor for further evaluation and ask him to answer any further questions you might have.

      Good luck :)

  41. QUESTION:
    what the deal with ovarian cysts?
    ok so a few months ago i had to go to the ER for the second time in the last 3 years for kidney stones well they decided to do some kind of scan this last time and found that i had an ovarian cyst about 4cm wide but my side has been hurting a lot for the last couple of months and i dont know if its the cyst....and if it is what should i do about it
    my parents are devorced so i hope around a lot and i have a twin so they dont listen to me when i say tht i am hurting but i think its effecting my period because they have been really late
    what should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      It does sound to me like you the pain you are experiencing is caused by the ovarian cyst, I have experienced the same type of symptoms you are describing, however the only way to know for sure is to find out by having another ultrasound (because cysts can grow, and if they become too big, they can twist or rupture). I would recommend that you speak to your doctor/gynaecologist and ask him/her any questions you may have with regards to it, such as what type of cyst is is, is it a simple cyst (such a as functional (fluid-filled) cyst) or a complex cyst (such as hemmorhagic cyst)? Ask your doctor/gyno what treatment options him/her could offer you, whether they would recommend waiting to see whether it resolve on it's own within a few cycles, whether your doctor/gyno may recommend you take the pill for a couple of months to see whether that helps resolve the cyst or whether you may need to have the cyst surgically (laparoscopy) drained/removed, especially since it is causing you this much pain.

      Good luck :)

  42. QUESTION:
    Have another cyst...is it likely...?
    ...Hello,

    I have had cysts since age 17 on and off which has disrupted my periods. I am now 28.

    I had an ovarian cyst that was 7cm x6cm x5cm last year, and within 6 weeks, at the second ultrasound, it had completely vanished.

    Now, almost a year on, I am getting those same pressure feelings down below in my abdomen as last year only without the sharp pains.

    Is it likely this cyst will also go by itself? And if there is no pain just pressure feeling on and off, does that mean it is probably smaller than that one last year?

    Every cyst I have had has been a functional cyst with clear fluid in, and develops with ovulation.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated..

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are very common. It is estimated that virtually all women who still have a monthly period, and 1 in 5 women who have been through the menopause, will have one or more ovarian cysts.

      Ovarian cysts that cause symptoms are much less common, affecting only 1 in every 25 women at some point in their life.

      Ovarian cysts usually do not affect a woman's ability to conceive.

      Even if the cyst is larger and needs to be removed, this is usually done using laparoscopy, which preserves a woman's fertility.

      Your doctor is the only person you should seek further advice from, he may have to send you for tests regarding the latest cyst.

  43. QUESTION:
    Complex ovarian cyst?
    Judy, my friend has 6 cm cyst she is 41. Pre menopausal. The cyst is solid and liquid filled. Wait or dont wait for surgery. Possible cance of losing the ovary if opts for surgery. Anyone, have experiencewith this sort of thing? Any advice? Greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      6cm is a decent size and could possibly cause damage if it twists. Has she been getting it monitored over a certain amount of time and found that it has grown/changed, or did she just discover it? Did the doctor recommend removal? Did she get an HE4 test? Ovarian cancer produces a lot of HE4, so high levels would indicate a high risk. It's hard to say if removal is the best option when faced with losing the ovary. Sometimes birth control is given to try to get a cyst to shrink down, but I guess it depends on just how complex and dangerous it appears and how badly it's affecting her. If it were me I'd closely monitor and wait at least 2 months to see if the cyst cleared itself up. However, I can understand if the pain is unmanageable and the possibility of going into early menopause doesn't matter, then removal might be the best option for peace of mind.

  44. QUESTION:
    Whats An ovarian cyst?
    i had went to the hospital last friday and they told me i had an ovarian cyst they told me how it cause and stuff. but i wanna know is it cause by the Depot shot? before i started taking depo i was fine and then all of a sudden i have an ovarian cyst. i just wanna know whats up. i wanna know should i stop taking the shot cause this was my first time im suppossed to get another one in december.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cyst and have any questions or concerns that you speak to your doctor and ask him/her for a referral to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  45. QUESTION:
    have you ever had an ovarian cyst?
    i haven't had my period in a while and i'm almost certain i'm not pregnant. i have lower back pain and lower abdominal pain, it also hurts to move sometimes. could it be a cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      If you have pain in your ovary area (this is the area you seem to be describing in your question), then you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced the same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst.

      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do) and 2 weeks ago had a 3.2cm ovarian cyst rupture causing me intense and severe pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding this pain you are experiencing, that you consult with your doctor/gyno for further evaluation. Your doctor/gyno will probably send you for an ultrasound to have a look at your ovaries and uterus and then be able to tell whether it is a cyst that is causing your pain and discomfort. Keep in mind that sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  46. QUESTION:
    is ovarian cyst deadly?
    if you are diagnosed as multicystic and dermoid is your situation can be critical or serious?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it can be deadly. I myself had ovarian cyst, but luckily mines was a size of a nickel. And if it is bigger than that, you will need to get surgery to take it out. Why It Is Done
      Surgery is used to confirm the diagnosis of an ovarian cyst, remove a cyst that is causing symptoms, and rule out ovarian cancer.

      Surgery for an ovarian cyst or growth may be advised in the following situations:

      Ovarian growths (masses) are present in both ovaries.
      An ovarian cyst is larger than 3in..
      An ovarian cyst that is being watched does not get smaller or go away in 2 to 3 months.
      An ultrasound exam suggests that a cyst is not a simple functional cyst.
      You have an ovarian growth and you:
      Have never had a menstrual period (for example, a young girl).
      Have been through menopause (postmenopausal woman).
      Use birth control pills (unless you are using low-dose progestin-only pills or have missed a pill, which would make an ovulation-related functional cyst more likely).
      Your doctor is concerned that ovarian cancer may be present. In this case, it is also advised that you see a gynecologic oncologist.

  47. QUESTION:
    Prevent ovarian cysts?
    I'm seventeen and I keep getting ovarian cysts. They're there for about a week, then they burst. This happens at least once a month, sometimes two or three times. It hurts so bad, sometimes I get a fever and it always makes me sick. I have a doctor's appointment, but not until January 8th. So, I'm wanting some answers now. Answers for questions such as: What causes this? and What kinds of treatments are there?

    I've looked up some treatments, but it never gave much information. The only thing I could find is birth control, which doesn't do me any good. I'm already on birth control and it doesn't seem to be helping the cysts at all.
    I've been to the ER with this twice, that's how I know it's cysts. The doctor told me to come in if I have another one burst, which I did just two days ago.

    • ANSWER:
      As another poster recommended, this is definitely a situation for a physician to diagnose, evaluate, and treat. Fortunately you have an appointment.

      There are sites that recommend nutrition and supplements to "balance" your hormones and help prevent cysts, but at the age of 48 I spent over 30 years suffering from ovarian cysts and didn't find nutrition or supplements to be helpful. Mine would twist and burst, causing sickening pain and infection and I would end up hospitalized on IV antibiotics. The only "cure" for mine was menopause, but I still continue to have occasional cystlike discomfort.

      Just in case you're curious about what others have to say about hormones and nutrition, try this site http://www.marilynglenville.com/general/cysts.htm.

      Birth control prevents follicle maturation (ovulation), so it also helps prevent cysts from developing. There are many different types of ovarian cysts http://www.ovarian-cysts-pcos.com/ovarian-cysts.html#sec4, your physician will need to determine what type you have before proceeding.

      Please be sure to keep a "symptom calendar" in which you write down which symptoms you experience on which day. This will help your physician diagnose you.

  48. QUESTION:
    what causes vaginal pain?
    id been feeling sharp pains in the vula not inside of it but in the out side though i feel it off and on id been feeling it all day today

    • ANSWER:
      List of 47 causes of Vaginal pain
      This section shows a full list of all the diseases and conditions listed as a possible cause of Vaginal pain in our database from various sources.

      Atrophic vaginitis - painful intercourse
      Autoimmune Endometriosis - Dyspareunia
      Autoimmune Interstitial Cystitis - Dyspareunia
      Bacterial vaginosis - painful intercourse
      Bartholin's abscess - one-sided vaginal pain
      Bartholin's cyst - intercourse discomfort
      Cervical Cancer - painful sex
      Chancroid - painful intercourse
      Dyspareunia - pain after sexual intercourse
      Ectopic pregnancy - pain after sex
      Endometrial Cancer - Pain during intercourse
      Endometrial conditions - Dyspareunia
      Endometriosis - pain after sexual activity (dyspareunia)
      Female infertility - Dyspareunia
      Female sexual conditions - Dyspareunia
      Frigidity - painful intercourse
      Genital system cancer - Dyspareunia
      Gulf War syndrome - sexual discomfort
      Gynaecological conditions - Vaginal pain
      Interstitial cystitis - pain during sexual intercourse
      Lichen sclerosis - vaginal bruising
      Lichen sclerosis et atrophicus - painful sexual intercourse
      Menopause - pain during intercourse
      Non-Specific Urethritis - pain during intercourse
      Ovarian cysts - pain during sexual intercourse
      Painful intercourse
      Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - pain from intercourse
      Sexual neuropathy - Painful intercourse
      Sjogren's Syndrome - painful intercourse
      Testicle disorders - Painful intercourse
      Torulopsis - vaginal burning
      Trichomoniasis - discomfort during intercourse
      Urethral cancer - painful sex
      Uterine Cancer - Pain during intercourse
      Uterine fibroids - pain during sexual intercourse
      Uterine sarcoma - Dyspareunia
      Vagina cancer - painful sex
      Vagina conditions - Painful intercourse
      Vaginal cancer
      Vaginal candidiasis - Vaginal burning
      Vaginal infection
      Vaginitis - sexual intercourse discomfort
      Virilising ovarian tumour - Dyspareunia
      Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome - Pain during intercourse
      Vulvovaginitis
      XK aprosencephaly - Painful intercourse
      Yolk sack tumour - Dyspareunia

  49. QUESTION:
    Can taking morning after once, cause an ovarian cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      Not that I know of.

      Ovarian Cysts are normal in childbearing-aged women, in fact, almost all women in this age group have cysts, but don't know. They come and go, but rarely cause problems (they can make periods painful).

      If the cyst lasts more than 2 or 3 periods or if you're post-menopausal (you've hit or passed menopause), it would be wise to see a doctor. If the cyst is large (5 centimeters or larger) surgery to remove the cyst is best.

  50. QUESTION:
    What Is Ovarian Cyst And how Can You Cure It?
    Can Ovarian Cyst be cured naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)


what causes ovarian cysts after menopause

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