Tag Archives: tubal reversal surgery

Surgery To Remove Mass On Ovary Ultrasound

3D & 4D ultrasound is the medical ultrasound techniques which is use to show your unborn baby. This latest technology of new 3D and 4D ultrasound machine has provided the facilities to see your baby in HD live motion in your womb. Basically ultrasound is using to see the width, length and depth of image of your unborn baby whether baby will be boy or girl and what the baby looks like. 3D/4D ultrasound does not provide the result in improved outcome in the pregnancy.

However, there are no direct benefits of an elective 3D/4D ultrasound and in some cases may be it can indirect benefits. So it is very important to note that medical has been no evidence to support its benefits. Although, there is no reason to increase cost and risk acknowledging general benefits in terms of pregnancy outcome. The risk of 3D is minor than 2D ultrasounds. 2D takes various angles to manufacture an image while 3D ultrasounds do not employ multiple snapshots. In some things, 3D and 4D images are very special and attractive for the parents who seen compared to the 2D image because 3D/4D they can visualize the baby is far more realistic.

3D and 4D ultrasound machine is safe and uses the exact intensity of ultrasonic waves as compare to 2D done in the office of your doctor. Advanced software creates the amazing images in 3D and 4D ultrasound waves with high intensity of output. In addition today, we are providing the latest and best systems in the world. It is far advanced technology than other 2D machines which do not show or delivering a high frame rate in result. You can get clearer and aesthetic photo of your baby who is part of your body and did not born.

The Atchafalaya Tubal Reversal Center is offering elective prenatal ultrasounds for limited diagnostic ultrasounds and fulfilling the services of prenatal imaging. Our specialist and expert team in 3D and 4D pride ourselves in excellent service and aggressive prices.

We use one the latest system in the world to increase your confidence and safety guidelines in delivering a higher frame rate. It means that you can get clearer and aesthetic photo of your nice baby with high resolution quality of the video. 4D is just safe the intensity of waves while the conventional 3D creates wonderful and amazing images. Through your optimum time between 24-35 weeks perform your delivery of pregnancy. It is very reliable and cost effective for your healthy baby treatment and safety.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    mass on uterus?
    THe dr called and said I had a mass on my uterus and a cyst on my ovary they want to bring me in after the holidays to "discuss my options" i asked like what kind of options, like a different bc or some medication to slow bleeding and stuff? And the dr said, well or surgery but we'll c.........
    So heres my ?, r they referring to a hysterectomy? And if so does that eliminate all my chances of getting cervical and ovarian cancer, they run in my familiy. Please tell me what u know, thanks

    • ANSWER:
      No, you won't need a hysterectomy (depending on how bad the mass is) for this. It may just be a fibroid. They can be removed with surgery or even left alone because some women develop them during pregnancy and they just hang around. They can sometimes cause irregular or increased bleeding and then they need to be removed.

      Since you have a family history of cervical and ovarian cancer, they may do a biopsy to find out if it is cancerous. If it is, they will remove it and possibly your ovaries (if they are effected and you are prepared to not have kids anymore.) If it is not, they may remove the mass or just leave it, as long as it doesn't interfere with the inside of your uterus or cause any bleeding.

      If it is cancer, there are processes to remove and save part of the ovaries to protect them from chemotherapy, therefore it is possible to still have children.

      Also, ovarian cysts are common. Most women get one or two every single cycle and then they disappear. If it is a prominent cysts that hangs around, if it is not cancerous as well, they can aspirate the fluid and check it again in a week to see if it is gone. Sometimes they re-fill with fluid and need to be aspirated again.

      Never fear. I would have to see your ultrasound, but i think you may just have a fibroid or ovarian cysts. Good luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    Ultrasound Results Question?
    So I had an TVag pelvic ultrasound & before the doc could go over all the results with me & answer all of my questions, he got called out for a C section! So, I'm in the dark about the results. The paperwork says:

    The Uterus is 8.5x4.5x4.2 cm. In the mid portion of the uterine canal, there is a hyperechoic focus suggesting a polyp or rather mass in this location. Consider hysterosonography or hysteroscopy to evaluate this if it persists after a repeat ultrasound in 2 to 3 menstral cycles. Nabothian cyste is noted incidentally.

    The remaining portions of the endomentrium is 8mm. The mass mentioned previously is 13x10x5 mm.

    Right ovary is 3.8x3.7x2.8cm and appears normal. The left ovary is 4.0x4.2x2.9cm and appears normal.

    I know this is a heavy medical question but, can anyone tell me what this means? Are my uterus and ovaries a normal size? Is that a large mass? What's hyperechoic focus? I'm having surgery for this on Wednesday and I'm still not sure what it is! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperechoic focus is an area the ultrasound picked up more soundwaves - this is why it is suggested there is something there. Your ovaries and uterus seem fine in size. Sounds to me like you either have a fibroid or a polyp. Very few of these become cancerous, but it's a good idea to have them removed anyway just to be on the safe side. The Nabothian cyste is just basically like a pimple. It's just a stopped up duct. Good Luck with your surgery.

  3. QUESTION:
    Dermoid cyst and ovary removal.... :(?
    Howdy! Not sure how much help this would be but I am very nervous about it. I was hoping someone had the same experience and might be able to offer some suggestions. I was TTC four years ago with my ex-husband (at 19, maybe not the smartest move) but I was told I had endometriosis and PCOS. I went to my doctor two weeks ago for pelvic pain and had my "talk" today. She said that she and the ultrasound tech *think* that I have a dermoid cyst on my left ovary and that the only way to remove it is surgery. Well, because she isn't sure that she can completely separate it she wants to take out my left ovary. She is sending me for a CAT scan and did a CA-125 blood test today. She wants to see if my bowel is attaching someone and if she needs a general surgeon in there as well. She also said that since I have had previous surgery that she would probably want to do it open instead of laparoscopically to make sure nothing breaks and floats around in there. Being 23 and wanting to wait before jumping into being a mother so I can go to school, I am terrified. I was wondering if there was anyone who had gotten pregnant with only one with IUI or IVF, if anyone had had this surgery before, and even though it isn't likely what are the chances that it will come back cancerous since they aren't even really sure. Thanks everyone!!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Hey you, I had a dermoid cyst removed about 8 weeks ago.
      During my annual ultrasound (I have PCOS) the tech found a large solid mass on my left ovary.
      At first my gyn made me panic because she said there was a solid mass on my ovary and that she was concerned and referred me to an oncologist. Which just that part alone freaked me out! So I went to him and he too said he felt a hard solid mass in my pelvic area and had me go in for an MRI with and without contrast. The results came back as a uterine dermoid and or fibroid. The size was 9cm (4 inches) and was told I needed to have it removed to be sure. As i'm 31 and looking to get pregnant as soon as I can (we hadn't been trying or anything) the doctor scheduled surgery within 3 weeks! Wasn't sure why the rush but glad to have it out.
      On my pre-op appointment the oncologist who is specialized in laparoscopic surgery said he's rather perform laperoscopically than open surgery since recover time is much longer and risk of ending up with scar tissue was greater with open and him performing these types of surgeries so often + as an oncologist I felt pretty safe. He did tell me however that there is a chance he may have to open and or remove an ovary (incase the mass had caused damage).
      Well, I had my surgery laparoscopically but did end up losing my left ovary since what turned out to be a dermoid was sitting on the outer part of my ovary and had pretty much squashed my ovary so it was removed. I was released a couple hours after my surgery and was back to work 2 weeks later.

      So, at first they always think worst case scenario and prepare you for the worse.
      I am glad I had mine removed. My doctor knows I plan on having children and was told the remaining ovary takes over the job of the other one and as long as you have one ovary producing eggs you are fine to get pregnant.
      I have a follow up on the 20th of this month...I am hoping he can tell me I am ready to try and conceive.

  4. QUESTION:
    Complex mass on ovary?
    My ultrasound showed a complex mass on my left ovary. I have a followup ultrasound next week. I already had one ovary removed due to a large tumor that was precancer. Could a complex mass be a cyst that will go away on its own? Or since it has solid tissue will it need surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry, but a complex mass will need surgery and likely will not go away on its own. It is most likely another tumor like the first one. You should speak with a fertility specialist as you will likely want to save that ovary while many docs will just want to remove it, because that's easier for them. It takes more surgical skill to save the ovary. Good luck!!!

  5. QUESTION:
    I underwent transvaginal ultrasound last january 24. i was found out to have a mass at my left ovary.?
    quite big but benign. i was recommended for operation but i am so afraid. is there any herbal/food supplement that will help in decreasing its size?

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem. Have the surgery. That is all I can recommend. Nothing will help reduce the size and you have to have this mass removed. Mine was a Mature Dermoid Teratoma. I had both of my ovaries removed and the mass ended up not being on my left ovary like the ultrasounds showed but, rooted onto my bowel. Please do yourself a favor have the surgery. Since my surgery I have lost over 50 pounds. I am no longer bloated all the time and I can actually sit and eat a meal, and finish my dinner not too bites and tell everyone I am full. Mature Dermoid Teratoma's are usually benign but, these are the tumors that can develop into a 2nd phase cancer and mine was showing very high risk on my blood marker screenings. Have the surgery. Get it removed.
      Good Luck.

  6. QUESTION:
    mass on ovary seen in ultrasound?
    i had a vaginal ultrasound done yesterday concerning my iud and a small solid mass was seen on my ovary. the dr said to come back in a month to have it rechecked. she said it may be a spot coming from the fact i am ovulating. can someone explain this to me.

    • ANSWER:
      Women get a small cyst every month on the side that they are ovulating from. It normally ruptures or goes away on it's own. Sometimes though, they don't & have to be surgically removed. My daughter is having problems with this right now. She had surgery the end of March - and now has another cyst on the same side that has to be removed.
      In your case - it was likely just the timing in being able to see the ovulation cyst :)
      Good luck!

  7. QUESTION:
    Can ovary ultrasounds determine if it is a cyst or mass?
    Background- I had my right ovary removed 3 years ago due to a cantelope sized tumor of borderline malignancy. Every few months I have transvaginal ultrasounds to monitor my left ovary.

    The ultrasounds until now have showed completely normal, functional cysts from time to time at most. The nurse called me today to tell me the ultrasound I had last week showed something on my left ovary, but they aren't sure what. They asked how soon I could come in to meet with the doctor and go over the ultrasound results. I find this worrying because if it was simply a functional cyst, I doubt they would have me drive an hour to meet with them and go over that, so they must know or suspect much more than what they told me over the phone.

    If it was a functional normal cyst, they'd be able to tell on the ultrasound, right? So the fact that they can't tell and want me to come in could likely mean something not good, right?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi. I had a borderline tumor, and for 11 years got a transvaginal ultrasound every 3 months. There are some lumps they can tell right away are cysts, and others they can tell right away are tumors, or complex cysts, for example. But they can't always tell. Ultrasounds don't have good visibility. On several occasions they found stuff on my ovaries and they made emergency appointments for me and I had further examinations and MRIs and CAT scans, etc. But they always turned out to be nothing (except once, when I had surgery for it). The point is, they cannot necessarily tell, and the correct protocol at that point is to turn on the alarm and rush you around to check and see. So the reason they're doing all this is that they're genuinely not sure and they need further testing. If they're not sure, then they need to act as if it's a tumor, because that's the correct protocol. By the way, have you been on birth control pills all this time. Because you should be--that will reduce or eliminate any possibility of cysts and reduce risk of ovarian cancer.

  8. QUESTION:
    Ultrasound report, complex ovarian mass?
    My left ovary now has "Complex mass at the left ovary including a prominent cystic component. Differential considerations for the left ovarian findings include hemorrhagic cyst as well as benign or malignant cystic ovarian neoplasm."

    Thats directly off the ultrasound report. It measures 4.6cm in greatest dimension, overall dimensions of 5.9x4.1x4.3 cm.

    I have another ultrasound in a 2 weeks. Depending on what that one shows, we'll go from there I guess. That left ovary likes to act up, even with being on birth control. My oncologist in Arizona (I live in Wyoming now) put in my records that I should have a diagnostic scope done if the cysts persist. My doctor here wants to see if getting the IR under control a little will help it.

    So basically... that ultrasound sounds vague to me. It's not a functional cyst. It's complex, possibly bleeding, possibly something a bit nastier.

    Any other input/stories/experiences/interpretation of the medical terminology greatly appreciated.

    It should be noted that prior to the surgery for having my right ovary removed, the radiologist described the tumor on it as a complex hemorrhagic mass as well. So, as you can see, this has me pretty worried. My right ovary was removed due to a borderline malignant tumor in 2008.

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly, I sympathise with you during this scarey time. I've just been diagnosed with similar on my right ovary and the doctor called it "chocolate cyst" where it is filled with dead blood and cells and they can keep growing (or if you are lucky they can also go down), or you can get ovarian torsion and cut off the blood supply or haemorrage and bleed uncontrollably. Greatest dimension 6.4cm. Doctor says don't take any risks just have it out, but I really don't want to :( I've been on depo provera for 10 years (no periods) and dr said it has probably suppressed it from being a bigger problem than it is.

      Are you in much pain? At times there is no pain, but at times it is unbearable and I'm just like "take it out now!" even though I am horrified of hospitals and drs due to past experience...

      The surgery to have your right ovary removed, how did that go? Did you get any pain after the operation or after healing? Did you heal quickly? I'm just a big worry wart.. I tell myself every day its nothing, could be worse, but can't stop worrying...

      Best of luck and even though u probably have alot more experience email me if you need a friend! :-)

  9. QUESTION:
    What does this ultrasound report mean? Complex mass on ovary?
    My left ovary now has "Complex mass at the left ovary including a prominent cystic component. Differential considerations for the left ovarian findings include hemorrhagic cyst as well as benign or malignant cystic ovarian neoplasm."

    Thats directly off the ultrasound report. It measures 4.6cm in greatest dimension, overall dimensions of 5.9x4.1x4.3 cm.

    I have another ultrasound in a 2 weeks. Depending on what that one shows, we'll go from there I guess. That left ovary likes to act up, even with being on birth control. My oncologist in Arizona (I live in Wyoming now) put in my records that I should have a diagnostic scope done if the cysts persist. My doctor here wants to see if getting the IR under control a little will help it.

    So basically... that ultrasound sounds vague to me. It's not a functional cyst. It's complex, possibly bleeding, possibly something a bit nastier.

    Any other input/stories/experiences/interpretations of the medical terminology greatly appreciated.

    It should be noted that prior to the surgery for having my right ovary removed, the radiologist described the tumor on it as a complex hemorrhagic mass as well. So, as you can see, this has me pretty worried. My right ovary was removed due to a borderline malignant tumor in 2008.

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    What could a complex mass on the ovary be?
    My ultrasound showed a complex mass on my left ovary. I have a followup ultrasound next week. I already had one ovary removed due to a large tumor that was precancer. Could a complex mass be a cyst that will go away on its own? Or since it has solid tissue will it need surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      I think I have explained this to you before.
      A mass is solid. If it is complex it is a cyst.
      Yes it could go away on its own most cysts do.

  11. QUESTION:
    Both ovaries have masses in them?
    I'm a 25 year old female and have had severe pelvic pain for a few months. I'm wondering if anyone else had experience similar to mine. I had an ultrasound done and they found each of my ovaries have a mass inside. I am going for an MRI today to pinpoint what the masses are exactly.

    the doctor suggested at my age that it could be a benign tumor or infection most likely but I am wondering if anyone had a similar experience.

    What was the result of the findings? did you need surgery? were you able to have more kids. i am having some anxiety until i can find otu what the results are. I go in for an MRI today. Please help with any advice thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I've had masses in both my ovaries at different times. They were ovarian cysts - one of them just ruptured by itself and there was no furthur problem. One was really large and I had to have the entire ovary removed. I did have one child after the ruptured one, and then I had another child after the ovary was removed. As long as you have one functioning ovary, you are fine to have children.

  12. QUESTION:
    I had a larascopy a few weeks back, they found and removed some endomitriosis.?
    My question to the girls is have any of you had Endo removed like that and if so did it improve your period pains, as I have yet to find out! and i heard that it can grow back has this happened to you?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had 3 surgeries to remove endometriosis. This is very painful and makes periods feel like hellllll. I had thought that my endometriosis was back, had such pain. I went to the er and had an ultrasound and found a 3 inch mass on my ovary that had ruptured. My entire body cavity was full of blood, as the mass was feeding off the ovary. Long story short... they took out the mass in an emergency surgery, and had to remove a damaged ovary and tube because of the mass, removed 2 quarts of blood, and had to tie my other tube. The OB said i would have bleed to death if we would not have cought this. Please report any pains to your doctor. There are many drugs they can put you on for endometriosis.... including the pill. Take care and hope this helps. Lisa

  13. QUESTION:
    Surgery for Ovary Mass or 10 more days of pain?
    here is some background on me:
    16 y/o
    110 IBS
    5'4
    Has had Periods since age 11. very Irregular.

    In the past 2-3 months I have missed my periods and have had extreme pain in my right side. I went to the hospital 2 days ago and they just called my mom with results from the ultrasound. Because I haven't had my period a mass of tissue and blood have made a ball in my right ovary. Here is where I need some advice.
    I want to have surgery to take it out as quickly as possible. This pain has made me miss almost a week of school now and I don't want to miss more. My mom is telling me that if I have surgery for it they will remove my ovary (is that true?) and they will have to go through my vagina to do so. I am horrified of that. Could it be taken out like a cyst? I have read that the recovery time is 1-4 days, which is really fast compared to my other option.

    This option is one I HATE. The doctor said to induce my period by taking a medicine.(starts with a P) The mass MIGHT break off in pieces by itself in 7-10 DAYS. I cannot wait that long. This pain is just too much.

    Should I keep asking for the surgery to get it out now? If I had surgery tomorrow (Friday) I would be ready for school by Monday, and I really miss school...

    • ANSWER:
      No, you should follow your doctor's advise, you shouldnt keep asking for surgery.

  14. QUESTION:
    Ovarian complex mass?

    Well i had an ultrasound recently to see whats going on with my ovaries and my right one had an ovarian cyst 3.5 cm in diameter. My left ovary is whats worrisome. There was a cyst i think bigger than the right one and inside are solid Components. The doctor kept referring to the overall thing as a mass which worried my mom. She said to do birth control pills for 8 weeks. In 8 weeks i will have another ultrasound and if the mass size stayed the same or grew then we would have to go in. First they would look and if they dont like it then thry will remove my whole ovary. Im worried since its a complex mass that its cancer. Any feedback would be great. Btw my doc is a gynecologist.

    • ANSWER:
      Mass is the correct term to use. and does not mean cancer.
      It just means tissues.

      Don't you trust your dr? The treatment sounds correct to me.
      And it is most likely that the pills will treat the mass, and
      you will avoid a difficult surgery. Very few masses of the ovary
      are cancer. most are just hormonal, and thus the pills will
      fix the problem

  15. QUESTION:
    dermoid cysts do they require surgery?
    hello there i am an 18 year old female. about two months ago i went into the ER due to having a UTI when they did the CT scan to check my abdomen (i also had stomach pain) they stated they found a mass in my ovary but nothing to worry about. over the last few weeks i have been having severe pain and been to the hospital a few times for them to say it was nothing but acid reflux, well this past monday on 3/5/12 i went to the gynecologist and she said that i have a dermoid cyst in my left ovary thats 7cm by 8cm and that she was going to send me a referral to go get a transvaginal pevlic ultrasound. well last night the pain was so severe i couldnt breathe and my bf took me to the hospital and they did the ultrasound there and found out and confirmed i do have a cyst and to follow up with another ob/gyn. my question is will it require surgery to remove the doctors said its not twisting my ovary because they can do that but i'm just worried. anyone have a dermoid removed before? do they always need surgery? please please respond!

    • ANSWER:
      It absolutely has to be removed research "Dermoid Cyst", don't get a fright, it happens.
      Very best of luck.

  16. QUESTION:
    can a large hematoma in my stomach be removed and what are the risks involve?
    Us pelvis-large cystic mass lesion measuring 30 times 20 times20cm found in midline abdomen extending into pelvis, complex nature, mixed internal echogenicity and vascularity. Difficult to distinguish mass from uterus-differential diagnoses: broad ligament haematoma, tumor, dermoid cyst arising from ovary or pedunculated degenaritive fibroid.

    • ANSWER:
      This must be from an ultrasound of the pelvis which showed a cystic mass lesion 30cm by 20 cm by 20 cm they're not sure what it is. Differential diagnosis means these are possible diagnoses. They don't know what it is, but very likely feel that it should come out, since it's not normal tissue.

      hematoma is hema=blood, oma = tumor (on the broad ligament). dermoid = resembles skin. pedunculated means on a stalk. and fibroid cyst resembles fiber.

      You shouldn't be concerned about having it removed as it 's not a major surgery.

  17. QUESTION:
    Can cysts be removed on the ovaries? Pros & cons?
    I have poly cystic ovarian syndrome and I'm wondering if the cysts on my ovaries can be removed?! If they are removed, what are the pros and cons of having this done and how is it done? (What is the procedure for something like this?) Also; does and will this effect my fertility at all?

    • ANSWER:
      When an ovarian growth or cyst needs to be closely looked at, a surgeon can do so through a small incision using laparoscopy or through a larger abdominal incision (laparotomy). Either type of surgery can be used to diagnose problems such as ovarian cysts, adhesions, fibroids, and pelvic infection. But if there is any concern about cancer, you may have a laparotomy. It gives the best view of the abdominal organs and the female pelvic organs . Then, if the doctor finds ovarian cancer, he or she can safely remove it.

      During surgery, a noncancerous cyst that is causing symptoms can be removed (cystectomy), leaving the ovary intact. In some cases, the entire ovary or both ovaries are removed, particularly when cancer is found.

      What To Expect After Surgery
      General anesthesia usually is used during surgery.

      After a laparoscopy, you can resume normal activities within a day, but you should avoid strenuous activity or exercise for about a week.

      After a laparotomy, you may stay in the hospital from 2 to 4 days and return to your usual activities in 4 to 6 weeks.

      Why It Is Done
      Surgery is used to confirm the diagnosis of an ovarian cyst, remove a cyst that is causing symptoms, and rule out ovarian cancer.

      Surgery for an ovarian cyst or growth may be advised in the following situations:

      Ovarian growths (masses) are present in both ovaries.
      An ovarian cyst is larger than 3in..
      An ovarian cyst that is being watched does not get smaller or go away in 2 to 3 months.
      An ultrasound exam suggests that a cyst is not a simple functional cyst.
      You have an ovarian growth and you:
      Have never had a menstrual period (for example, a young girl).
      Have been through menopause (postmenopausal woman).
      Use birth control pills (unless you are using low-dose progestin-only pills or have missed a pill, which would make an ovulation-related functional cyst more likely).
      Your doctor is concerned that ovarian cancer may be present. In this case, it is also advised that you see a gynecologic oncologist.
      How Well It Works
      An ovarian cyst can be removed from an ovary (cystectomy), preserving the ovary and your fertility. But it is possible for a new cyst to form on the same or opposite ovary after a cystectomy. New cysts can only be completely prevented by removing the ovaries (oophorectomy).

      Risks
      Risks of ovarian surgery include the following:

      Ovarian cysts may come back after a cystectomy.
      Pain may not be controlled.
      Scar tissue (adhesions) may form at the surgical site, on the ovaries or fallopian tubes, or in the pelvis.
      Infection may develop.
      The bowel or bladder may be damaged during surgery.
      What To Think About
      Surgery may be recommended if you have a large cyst, cysts in both ovaries, or other characteristics that may suggest ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer can occur in women of all ages but the incidence increases after menopause.

  18. QUESTION:
    complex masses on ovaries.....pllllleasse answer :(?
    Hello everyone...I am asking in this section in hopes that I can get some people to respond, I havent gotten a response in any other. I had a partial hysterectomy on Dec. 16 due to pre cancer cells on my cervix. I thought my problems were over. Well last Tuesday I went to the hospital because I was haing left side pains and thought it was kidney stones. The doc in the ER ordered a cat scan to see if he could see them. Well it turned out I had no stones but he told me that he had seen a few things that made him a little worried so he ordered a ultrasound. The ultrasound showed I have some masses on my ovaries. He also told me that he saw some fluid in my abdomen and my liver is enlarged. I dont understand why these masses were not seen when I got my hysterectomy done and I am very concerned.
    THE REPORT:
    Findings:
    The patient has reportedly had a partial hysterectomy. Blood flow is identified in both ovaries. The right ovary measures 3.5cm in lenght and contains solid or complex nodules, the largest measuring about 1.9 x 2.2 x 2.3 cm. The left ovary measure about 4.8 cm in length and contains multiple small cystic lesions or a complex septated cystic lesion measuring about 1.6 x 2.2 x 2.3 cm, as well as a dominant area of hypoechoic but apparently solid nodularity measuring about 3.0 x 3.4 x 3.4 cm. No significant free fluid is idenified in the pelvis.
    Impression: status post partial hysterectomy. Biliateral complex ovarian masses.
    Please give me your thoughts and opinion on the findings please. And thank you to everyone!!

    • ANSWER:
      A friend of mine has endometriosis (not sure if spelled correctly) which means she has polyps that keep recurring on her ovaries and it causes her severe stomach pain when she isnt treated. Now she has a shot every month in her lower back that keeps the polyps from coming back and she is doing a lot better. Maybe you are just having a complication with from the surgery as well. Cervical cancer runs in my family but idk of any of my relatives who had to have a partial hysterectomy due to pre-cancer cells. They were removed or frozen out. On some of my relatives that it had progressed on had to have partial or complete hysterectomy. You could try typing in all your symptoms into webmd.com that might have some good ideas to what it might be but I suggest you find a specialist that can help you before ur situation worsens.

  19. QUESTION:
    Ovary cyst ladies please explain?
    how do u get it? I had my left cyst removed about twos years and I am curious on how all this happen

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs that are formed in the ovaries (ovaries are two small organs on each side of the womb or the uterus that produce hormones and an egg each month) which produce hormones and an egg each month. These are common in women in their reproductive years.

      Most of these cysts are non-cancerous (benign). The various types of cysts are:
      Functional cyst
      This is the most common type. It is formed due to an aberration in the development of an egg. In a normal course a mature follicle ruptures in the ovary to release the egg and then forms a mass called the Corpus Luteum. If pregnancy does not occur in that cycle, the Corpus luteum normally disintegrates. If this does not happen then a functional cyst is formed. The functional cysts normally do not produce any symptoms and disappear within one-three menstrual cycles.

      Dermoid cyst
      These are ovarian cysts filled with cheesy material and may have various types of tissue including hair and skin in them.

      Cystadenoma
      These are cysts which develop from the outer surface of the ovary. Majority of them are benign (non- cancerous).

      Endometrial or chocolate cyst
      Sometimes clusters of cells normally found in the lining of the uterus (endometrial cells) attach themselves to the ovary causing an endometrial cyst to form. This is a dark and red-brown coloured cyst and hence is also called chocolate cyst.

      Polycystic ovary
      In this condition the ovaries have multiple small cysts. These result from hormonal imbalance. These women are usually overweight and can have excessive facial hair and difficulty in conceiving.

      Ovarian cysts usually do not cause any symptoms. However if the symptoms occur, they are:
      A feeling of fullness in the stomach or a slight pain.
      Irregular or painful periods
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      They may be detected by a pelvic examination which could be confirmed by other tests.
      Ultrasound is a test in which sound waves are used to create pictures of the organs found inside the body. It can be used to confirm the presence of the cyst and many times the nature of the cyst.

      The treatment depends upon the size and type of the cyst, the women s age and overall health, her future pregnancy plans and the symptoms that she is experiencing. The treatment options include:
      Expectant Where the cysts are small (< 8 cm) and appear functional, they can be observed for 2-3 months as many of them resolve. In the past hormones have also been given particularly with irregular periods. Currently their use is not found to be of any benefit.

      Surgery can be decided upon if the cyst does not disappear on its own or is causing severe pain or bleeding or if the cyst is of a type which requires surgery (Dermoid, Endometrial, Cystadenoma). Surgery can be through laparoscope or conventional (by an incision on the tummy), depending on the size & type of cyst patient profile and expertise of surgeon.

      Treatment of Polycystic ovaries This depends upon the requirement of the patient, her symptoms and profile. Weight reduction in an overweight patient constitutes the most important treatment. The other treatments can be hormonal for regularising the periods and for excessive facial hair as well as ovulation induction (aiding in producing an egg) in case of infertility.

      Enjoy Life

  20. QUESTION:
    Surgery for ectopic pregnancy?
    Today I'm schedule for sugery to remove ectopic pregnancy. Im so scared and extremely nervous. I have had two rounds of methotrexate and my hcg levels just haven't dropped enough. With my first round my levels were 207 and dropped to 196. With my second round my levels were 196 and dropped to 173 and stayed at 173 for a week or so. My doc said we should just go ahead worth the surgery. Im not having any pain or bleeding. When I got the first round of methotrexate I didnt really bleed either. It wasnt enough to fill up a pad. When I got the second round I did bleed kind oud like a period. I also had some cramping, bloating, and I passed some clots. So I knew for sure that the medicine was working and my beta hcg would show that my levels eerie dropping like they should. When they did another ultrasound last week the ultrasound tech said she saw a mass but didn't know for sure if it was ectopic or not. When I talked to my doc he said that the mass did get smaller but iut was still there. I know it needs to be done to know what's going on, but I'm just do neverous I guess that's expected. If anyone has gone through an ectopic pregnacy and had to get sugery I would really appreciate some info on what to expect before and after surgery. Thanks in advance and any words of encouragement would be greatly appreciated! I need to try to calm down and relax

    • ANSWER:
      I had an ectopic pregnancy in July of 2010. I did not have to get the surgery. But I also did get to rounds of methotrexate. I never bleed so much or threw up so much in my life. I bleed for 2 weeks & 4 days. I didn't eat for 4 days. My blood pressure would dip so low I would pass out durning those 4 days. My fiance managed to get a power aide into me about once a day. I did not have to have the surgery. After getting blood work every 3 days for almost a month my levels went down. My due date is in 2 weeks & I still feel like total sh*t over it. I cry at least once a week thinking about my pregnancy.
      I have been told having an ectopic pregnancy with or with out the surgery isn't the end of the world. You can still have kids. Are they taken your tube? It seems from what you said they are just going to go & clean the mass out. A lady on here told he she has 2 ectopics was told she couldn't have kids then had 6 after that! Another friend of mine only has 1 tube & 1 ovary & has 4 kids. So don't give up hope. If your scared its fine to go get a 2nd opinion. But understand time isn't on your side. My ectopic was ready to burst. (doctor said with in hours) Because I was 22 & my first pregnancy they didn't want to go into surgery. (the first hospital did. They wanted to do experimental surgery before they ruled it was ectopic. signed myself out of that hospital AMA as fast as i could!)
      You have to understand if you don't get that mass out of there, you could go septic & die. A girl I work with had that happen!

      Send me an email if you want to talk hun! Keep your head up! I understand what your going threw.

  21. QUESTION:
    I just found out i have cysts on my ovaries and Im scared please help?
    Today i went to my doctor and she informed me that I had multiple cysts on both ovaries
    here are the details:
    simple cyst in left ovaries about 26 * 17 mm
    echogenic mass in right ovaries about 18 mm

    please tell me if i have serious problems?
    btw im 19 and virgin

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a couple of cysts in my ovaries over the years. If they are small enough, they will usually go away by themselves. If the doctor says they are a certain size, usually you need surgery to remove them which is not a big deal. I had one pop in August and boy did that hurt and that is something you do not want. If made me hung over and not move, kind of felt like appendicitis to me (that is from my feeling of it). Now some things that can cause a cyst is an irregular period (what I have), history of cysts, smoking, cancer (do not panic you don't have cancer just saying), early menstruation, and infertility.

      You might experience more ultrasonic observation or endovaginal ultrasound are used repeatedly and frequently to monitor the growth of the cyst. But you should not stress out or worry, you doctor knows you have them and will take care of you. If you experience any pain then call you doctor immediately maybe one of them popped. Good luck deary, and don't stress.

  22. QUESTION:
    Ultrasound report, complex ovarian mass?
    My left ovary now has "Complex mass at the left ovary including a prominent cystic component. Differential considerations for the left ovarian findings include hemorrhagic cyst as well as benign or malignant cystic ovarian neoplasm."

    Thats directly off the ultrasound report. It measures 4.6cm in greatest dimension, overall dimensions of 5.9x4.1x4.3 cm.

    I have another ultrasound in a 2 weeks. Depending on what that one shows, we'll go from there I guess. That left ovary likes to act up, even with being on birth control. My oncologist in Arizona (I live in Wyoming now) put in my records that I should have a diagnostic scope done if the cysts persist. My doctor here wants to see if getting the IR under control a little will help it.

    So basically... that ultrasound sounds vague to me. It's not a functional cyst. It's complex, possibly bleeding, possibly something a bit nastier.

    Any other input/stories/experiences/interpretation of the medical terminology greatly appreciated.

    It should be noted that prior to the surgery for having my right ovary removed, the radiologist described the tumor on it as a complex hemorrhagic mass as well. So, as you can see, this has me pretty worried. My right ovary was removed due to a borderline malignant tumor in 2008.

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    What is Degenerative Ovary Cystadenoma?
    Can someone please explain to me what this is exactly? I can't seem to find a lot of information about it? Also, why this would lead me to need to see a reproductive endocrinologist. Thanks for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi - this, from the web:

      "If you have been diagnosed with an ovarian cystadenoma, you need to know what it is and what to expect next. A cystadenoma differs from a cyst in that it can grow much larger and it will require surgery to treat.

      An ovarian cystadenoma is an abnormal growth that forms from ovarian tissue. Most of the time, these are not cancerous. However, left untreated, they can grow exceptionally large.

      There are two types of cystadenomas: serous and mucinous. Serous, despite sounding like serious, are not as severe as mucinous. Serous cystadenomas are filled with a thin, watery liquid. They usually grow up to between two and six inches in diameter. Mucinous cystadenomas are filled with a sticky thick liquid. They grow much larger: between 6 and 12 inches in diameter. In rare cases, they have been known to weigh up to 100 pounds.

      Cystadenomas are usually diagnosed using an ultrasound. If the doctor sees a large mass on your ovary, he may order an x-ray. This x-ray will determine if the cyst is filled with liquid or is solid, and will help the doctor determine if it could be a malignant tumor.

      The treatment for an ovarian cystadenoma is to surgically remove it. If it is smaller, the doctor will perform a laparoscopy. This involves making a small incision in the lower abdomen and inserting a narrow tube called a laparoscope. This tube allows the doctor to see into your abdomen and remove smaller cysts.

      If the cystadenoma is larger than 2 inches in diameter, the doctor will need to do surgery. He will remove the cyst, and in some case, the ovary. If cancer is suspected, a total hysterectomy is usually performed.

      One good thing about an ovarian cystadenoma is that they rarely come back. If it is removed completely, you are likely to never get another one. Even if you lose one ovary to a cystadenoma, you still have a chance of getting pregnant."

      The ovarian cystadenoma grows on the outside of the ovary. Clearly one could affect your chances of pregnancy if the ovary has to be removed, although you can still get pregnant via the remaining ovary.

      The word 'degenerative' in your diagnosis simply means that the cystadenoma has caused deterioration of specific tissues, cells, or organs with corresponding impairment or loss of function, caused by injury, disease, or ageing. Degenerative implies that it will not heal on its own, and may cause further damage to your ovary if it is left in place.

      Good luck.
      ------------------
      ooops! Forgot to add that a 'reproductive endocrinologist' is another name for a Fertility Specialist: link below:

      http://www.fertilitylifelines.com/difficultygettingpregnant/workingwithafertilityspecialist.jsp

  24. QUESTION:
    Medical Experts: What could this large mass be?
    My mom is 54 and her gyno recently discovered via ultrasound a 'large mass' about the size of a baby's head in her abdomen. She gone through menopause and is abstinent, so she's not pregnant.

    The mass is hard, round, movable by manual manipulation and all in one area. I felt it and it seems to be to the left of her navel. She's going for a CT scan tomorrow before they do surgery to remove it.

    What are some of the possibilities of what this could be? She is has been a smoker since age 15 and binge drinks about once a week.

    Thank you for your expertise.

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely diagnosis would be cystic ovary because of its mobility. Uterine masses are usually fixed and not rounded. Other organs to consider but probably remote possibilities would be the large intestine, the spleen, urinary bladder, the mesentery, small intestines, or kidney.

  25. QUESTION:
    There some blood mass of about 6-8cm dia in both the overy, what is this and and how it can be cure, Help?
    is it surgery is only option r can be cure by medicine, what is the medicine?
    Thanks for your nice reply. she takes some medicine which may be similer to birth control pills. pregancy is not any issue, we ahve kids, but we are fear for the surgery that is why we want treatment by medicine prefered.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you are describing a "chocolate cyst" which is an endometrioma.

      Usually endometriomas that are 4 cm or larger do not go away without surgery. Sometimes if they are smaller than 4 cm, they go away in time on their own. Some doctors prescribe birth control pills to try to shrink them...although, this is not always effective.

      Are you in any pain from these? Are you trying to get pregnant? The answers to these questions may be the deciding factor on if you choose to have surgery to remove them.

      Endometriomas are not known to cause cancer. However, they cannot be sure that they are indeed endometriomas until they get in there and biospy them. Endometriomas can cause the fallopian tubes to get plugged thus interfering with fertility.

      EDIT...

      If I was done having kids, and didn't have any pain from it (including painful intercourse), I would do the conservative treatment as well....periodic ultrasounds to monitor and hormone meds to try to shrink. But that is just MY opinion.

      I'm faced with this problem right now. Except, we don't have kids yet and we have been trying (I'm 35) and I do have pain from it. I've been putting off the surgery for 4 months now, but the Pill didn't do anything so far to shrink it. If it was a fluid filled cyst, it most likely would have shrunk it. So they are thinking it is either an endometrioma or a dermoid (gross!)

      If left untreated, there is a risk of ovarian torsion (ovary twisting, cutting off the blood supply and the ovary dying...emergency surgery is required if this happens).

      Good luck to your wife for whatever treatment you two choose.

  26. QUESTION:
    Is removal of the ovary the only way to diagnose ovarian cancer?
    I have an enlarged right ovary (3cm). I have had 2 ultrasounds, 1 MRI, 1 Cat scan. Part of the mass is solid which is causing the concern. The doctor, who I don't know from a hill of beans, says that the only way to determine if it is cancerous is to remove it, his reasoning being that if he opens it up while it is still inside of me, and it is, indeed, cancer, then the cancer cells would spread throughout my body. Is this the only way to diagnose ovarian cancer? I had the CA125 and it came back normal. I have had no other symptoms and I do not recover well from surgery. He asked me "Do you want to be alive with one ovary, or dead with two?

    • ANSWER:
      You could get a second opinion, but if he is a good doc, then I would listen to him. CA125 and the like blood works only tend to imply cancer or not. I don't think they are foolproof...you CAN have post-menopausal type of ovarian cysts, where an egg tries to get out/break free from the ovary and is unable to so it forms a cyst. Depends upon your age too whether that would be true or not. They just watch those with ultrasounds. But with the extra tests, it sounds like they are very concerned with something. Don't delay whatever you do...even if you are going to get a second opinion...

      Take someone else with you to appointments where they explain stuff to you...sometimes you hear the word "cancer" and you can't hear anything else after that due to a feeling of shock...

  27. QUESTION:
    Tumor removal during pregnancy?
    I'm 22 weeks pregnant. At 10 weeks, I had an ultrasound where they found a 2 in. mass in my ovary. They said they would monitor it to make sure it didn't grow or anything like that. At my 18 week ultrasound they noticed it had grown an inch and had some solid parts to it, making it a tumor. They're afraid it may twist on itself due to it's large size (which is life threatening and results in emergency surgery) or there's a small chance it could be cancerous. I'm 20 years old, and I've never had surgery before (except for my wisdom teeth, and I was only sedated). They're going to have to remove my entire right ovary. Has anyone had surgery during pregnancy or even more so an ovary removal? I'm just really scared about the whole thing.

    • ANSWER:
      My sister-in-law had gallbladder surgery while pregnant. She and her daughter are both fine, many years later.

  28. QUESTION:
    right ovary is 10.4cc left is 55.8cc with cysts and extreme pain tumours?
    i had an ultrasound last year and they found a golf ball sized mass on my left ovary , i had another one and the lady doing the scan said it was gone BUT was in fact still there (only found out a week ago when my doctor wanted the reports) i had another one yesterday because i have been getting some bad pains , and the measurements are shown in the title of what my ovary sizes are , i also have multiple follicles and 2 cysts measuring at 3.5cm and 3cm , i awoke with SEVERE pain , im thinking one of them cysts are playing up . if im completley still the pain is minimal but its hard 2 move , i have had surgery b4 and it was really traumatic due to doctors hiding stuff from me do you think i will need surgery ?
    (please note that for some reason on my result form from the ultrasound it says they want the so called cysts to be tested to see if they are tumours . also my mum passed from cancer starting in uterus and ovaries

    • ANSWER:
      Do NOT let doctors "hide" things from you - how old are you anyway? Be firm and assertive and ask lots of questions.

      Those are fairly large tumours, and if you are in that much pain, go to emergency. Especially if you have a direct family history of ovarian cancer! DO NOT LET ANYONE TELL YOU THIS IS NOT SERIOUS, no matter how old you are.

      One thing to keep in the back of your mind is doctors are people just like us, and it is YOUR body, not theirs.

      You will definitely need surgery. DO NOT let the doctors do a laparotomy (where they slice you from side to side like a smile on your abdomen). There are far less invasive ways of scraping the follicles and removing the cysts either through the vagina, or they make a small cut in your navel and get them out that way. You are asleep for either procedure.

      If you are in that much pain, go NOW. Get the process started.

      I wish you all the best from the bottom of my heart.

      I don't understand why they waited a year to tell you about the cysts! That's insane!

  29. QUESTION:
    Anxiety while waiting on surgery and diagnosis? Fearful of what they will tell me...?
    I am having my first surgery a week from today, and have not yet figured out how to process my fears. I am scared of having surgery, also scared that they are going to give me bad news following it. I have a mass on my right ovary, originally the Dr. was referring to it as a cyst, but today he told me that from the ultrasound they can not tell where exactly it is, what its attached to, or even what it is. It has doubled in size in the past 3 weeks and now over 10cm. I also have something on my left ovary, but he thinks that is just a functional cyst and will check when he is doing the laparoscopy on Monday.

    I am terrified and completely convinced that it is going to be cancer, becuase the doctor was asking me a lot of questions about family history and not really answering any of my questions on what this could be. Also, he mentioned that whatever was removed would be sent to pathology before I know exactly what we are dealing with.

    I am 26 years old, mother of 2 young girls, and for the past week of waiting on todays visit I have been an emotional wreck, now I have to wait another week to go into surgery and then another 7 dyas or so on pathology reports. I know compared to some others, things are moving pretty quickly (they just found this mass a little over a month ago) but I feel like each day of waiting is forever, and my heart is heavy with fear.

    Does anyone have any ideas on how I can take my mind off of this and get through work and being a mother without breaking down in tears multiple times a day? I am taking something for anxiety, but it really isnt helping at all.

    • ANSWER:

  30. QUESTION:
    Complex Ovarian cyst during pregnancy?
    I've been diagnosed with a complex ovarian cyst (possibly endometrioma) in my left ovary for more than a year now. Its size has been quite consistent (7.5 cms).

    I was advised that, considering my age and the fact that I wanted to have a baby, I should try to conceive and if I did then the chances are that the cyst wouldn't grow any further and might actually shrink or even disappear during the lactation period.

    Now I am 40 days along, my doctor confirmed the pregnancy but when she did the physical exam she said she felt a huge mass (about 10 cms) near my pelvis, which she thinks might be twin pregnancy or a dramatically overgrown cyst or may be the pregnancy happened in the tube or there could be a number of other things.

    So, to alleviate her doubts she has asked me to have an ultrasound next week .

    I am really worried. Is there a chance that I may need a surgery? Wouldn't that harm the baby? What is the treatment method if the baby is formed in the tube?

    • ANSWER:
      If the baby is formed in the tube they will have to do surgery to remove it or there is a 50% chance you and your other baby will die. If it is a cyst they will probably either recommend you wait until you are full term and have a c-section (and then they will remove the cyst at the same time) or else they will just wait until after you have the baby. They won't do surgery and risk the baby for the cyst ok? Take a deep breath and try not to worry about it until after the ultrasound. Be grateful that your Dr. caught it so early and is doing an ultrasound. Good luck and I hope everything turns out ok for you!

  31. QUESTION:
    I need some help deciphering my rad. report?
    Ive had these symptoms for almost 2 years now: bloated feeling, like Im always gonna start my period. very low back pain specifically on the right side. Pain that feels like its in my hip bones & radiates down my upper legs. After lying or sitting I have to make myself take painful steps until I can get going. Gas, no matter what I eat. Not hungry, doesn't take much to feel full. No weight loss though (if anything weight gain). I also only have had 1 or 2 periods a year. (pre-menopausal); have had intravaginal ultrasounds & based on the last results my doctor wants to get me into surgery right away to remove my right ovary. She does not want to run anymore tests (no MRI or CA125) Is that normal procedure?? this is the report: The endometrial echo complex measures .3cm in thickness.there is a 2.5 x2.6 cm density whithin the right adnexal. There is some echogenicity and evidence of accoustic shadowing which was not seen previously. though the configuration is similar to the previously demonstrated complex right adnexal lesion & there is possible calcification. (plus theres the other generic writings) Does this sound like something benign?? or does it sound more like ovarian cancer?? thank you - my mind is going crazy waiting to get back in to see the doctor & have the surgery scheduled.....She said I really dont have any other options at this point.

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor is correct. There is no point in running further tests when it is not going to change the fact that you need surgery. Any adnexal mass larger than 2cm should be considered suspicious and it could rupture. It needs to be removed.

  32. QUESTION:
    Registered letter to vet before suing? Does it sound ok?
    ATTN: Dr. Richard Allan

    On October 9, 2010 I brought my dog, Princess, into your clinic to examine a lump on her lower abdomen near her left hind leg. You told me it was a touch of Breast Cancer and that if she has a hysterectomy and the mass removed at the same time, she would be fine. I trusted the vets advice as I do not have any type of medical degree.
    The operation was performed on the 20th of October, the following week. When I called in during the day of her surgery I was told she was doing amazing and she could go home the following afternoon. When I picked her up on the 21st, I had to ask for something for pain, as nothing was offered and I was given basic feeding and walking (or not to walk) instructions. The following day my dog became very ill. I called your clinic only to be told this was normal, as was her not eating or drinking. By the 25th after still being told it was normal, I decided to get a second opinion.
    On October 25, 2010, I consulted with Dre. Christine Carle of Hopital Veternaire Victoria and I was informed Princess was severely dehydrated and she was put in intensive care with an IV, something I later learned should have been done during the initial operation and was not. After 24 hours she began showing signs of improvement. Again she returned home.
    On November 1, Dre. Carle felt an unusual mass in her abdomen during a checkup. In order to find out what the mass was, Princess has an x-ray done, which indicated it was possibly a piece of stool.
    The following day, Princess began vomiting again so we returned to Dre. Carle s clinic. At this time an ultrasound was performed to diagnose what the mass was. To our surprise, a complete hysterectomy was not performed as your clinic stated. Only a portion of her uterus was removed and both of her ovaries remained. Emergency surgery was performed on November 3rd to remove the infected ovaries, clear-out abscesses and the infection in her abdomen, later found to be caused by staph bacteria from an external source.
    My dog has suffered a great deal of unnecessary pain and suffering and endured a painful surgery that never should have been needed.
    I hold you and your clinical staff responsible for the cost endured at another vet. Enclosed you will find all relevant documentation, pictures, x-rays and bills. I also demand a refund for the original surgery performed at your clinic by your veterinary staff in the amount of 3615.28$.
    I have notified the Provincial board governing Veterinary Medicine and they have informed me to demand payment from you directly, before proceeding with legal measures. Therefore, I await reimbursement in full in the ten (10) following days or I will have no choice but to take legal action. Please govern yourself accordingly.

    Respectfully,

    Amelia Bourdeau

    • ANSWER:
      One correction: Removing the uterus IS a complete hysterectomy. Removing the ovaries is not part of a hysterectomy.

      That said, if the first vet diagnosed cancer based entirely on a PHYSICAL exam, they are guilty of malpractice. Your letter is well written and should be as effective as anything an attorney would produce.

  33. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts, curious?
    I found out I have a hemorrhagic cyst (1.6 x 1.3cm)on my right ovary and anechoic cyst (2.4 x 1.5cm)on my left.

    There is flow in both ovaries.
    And I have a homogeneous appearing uterus with no gross evidence of mass.
    (Im going off what the ultrasound report says)

    I wanted to know if these are too serious, and could cause infertility. Or require surgery.

    Im just really worried and have insurance issues right now, so it will be about a month before I get back to the doctor.

    Any info will be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I am having surgery Tuesday to remove a cyst on my left ovary 4.3 cm in size. (pretty big, I know). Also, my doc has informed me that I have endometriosis, so that will be taken care of at the same time.

      Just talk to your doc about your options, you may want to get this taken care of asap if it continues to give you problems. My sis has been having a cyst for 2 years now and it really doesnt bother her that much. They can burst and you may have bigger problems.

      My doc also has told me that my cyst could be the exact reason why my DH & I have not conceived #2 for the past 2 years being that we have done test after test on he and I and cant find anything wrong.

      Good Luck

  34. QUESTION:
    Fibroid tumors?
    I asked a question yesterday and only 1 reponse. How do you live with them? Did you need surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      I am a doctor..
      Are you talkin about uterine fibroids?
      they are not bad tumors as such..

      hope this would help you..
      Uterine fibroids are noncancerous growths of the uterus that often appear during your childbearing years. Also called fibromyomas, leiomyomas or myomas, uterine fibroids aren't associated with an increased risk of uterine cancer and almost never develop into cancer.

      As many as three out of four women have uterine fibroids, but most are unaware of them because they often cause no symptoms. Your doctor may discover them incidentally during a pelvic exam or prenatal ultrasound.

      In general, uterine fibroids cause no problems and seldom require treatment. Medical therapy and surgical procedures can shrink or remove fibroids if you have discomfort or troublesome symptoms. Rarely, fibroids can require emergency treatment if they cause sudden, sharp pelvic pain.

      Causes

      Uterine fibroids develop from the smooth muscular tissue of the uterus (myometrium). A single cell reproduces repeatedly, eventually creating a pale, firm, rubbery mass distinct from neighboring tissue.

      Fibroids range in size from seedlings, undetectable by the human eye, to bulky masses that can distort and enlarge the uterus. They can be single or multiple, in extreme cases expanding the uterus so much that it reaches the rib cage.

      Doctors don't know the cause of uterine fibroids, but research and clinical experience point to several factors:
      Genetic alterations. Many fibroids contain alterations in genes that code for uterine muscle cells.
      Hormones. Estrogen and progesterone, two hormones that stimulate development of the uterine lining in preparation for pregnancy, appear to promote the growth of fibroids. Fibroids contain more estrogen and estrogen receptors than do normal uterine muscle cells.
      Other chemicals. Substances that help the body maintain tissues, such as insulin-like growth factor, may affect fibroid growth.

      Treatment
      There's no single best approach to uterine fibroid treatment. Many treatment options exist. In most cases, the best action to take after discovering fibroids is simply to be aware they are there.

      Watchful waiting
      If you're like most women with uterine fibroids, you have no signs or symptoms. In your case, watchful waiting (expectant management) could be the best course. Fibroids aren't cancerous. They rarely interfere with pregnancy. They usually grow slowly and tend to shrink after menopause when levels of reproductive hormones drop. This is the best treatment option for a large majority of women with uterine fibroids.

      Medications
      Medications for uterine fibroids target hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle, treating symptoms such as heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pressure. They don't eliminate fibroids, but may shrink them. Medications include:

      Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists. To trigger a new menstrual cycle, a control center in your brain called the hypothalamus manufactures gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH). The substance travels to your pituitary gland, a tiny gland also located at the base of your brain, and sets in motion events that stimulate your ovaries to produce estrogen and progesterone.

      Medications called Gn-RH agonists (Lupron, Synarel, others) act at the same sites that Gn-RH does. But when taken as therapy, a Gn-RH agonist produces the opposite effect to that of your natural hormone. Estrogen and progesterone levels fall, menstruation stops, fibroids shrink and anemia often improves.

      Androgens. Your ovaries and your adrenal glands, located above your kidneys, produce androgens, the so-called male hormones. Given as medical therapy, androgens can relieve fibroid symptoms.

      Danazol, a synthetic drug similar to testosterone, has been shown to shrink fibroid tumors, reduce uterine size, stop menstruation and correct anemia. However, occasional unpleasant side effects such as weight gain, dysphoria (feeling depressed, anxious or uneasy), acne, headaches, unwanted hair growth and a deeper voice, make many women reluctant to take this drug.
      Other medications. Oral contraceptives or progestins can help control menstrual bleeding, but they don't reduce fibroid size. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are not hormonal medications, are effective for heavy vaginal bleeding unrelated to fibroids, but they don't reduce bleeding caused by fibroids.

      Hysterectomy
      This operation the removal of the uterus remains the only proven permanent solution for uterine fibroids. But hysterectomy is major surgery. It ends your ability to bear children, and if you elect to have your ovaries removed also, it brings on menopause and the question of whether you'll take hormone replacement therapy.

      Myomectomy
      In this surgical procedure, your surgeon removes the fibroids, leaving the uterus in place. If you want to bear children, you might choose this option. With myomectomy, as opposed to a hysterectomy, there is a risk of fibroid recurrence. There are several ways a myomectomy can be done:
      Abdominal myomectomy. If you have multiple fibroids, very large or very deep fibroids, your doctor may use an open abdominal surgical procedure to remove the fibroids.
      Laparoscopic myomectomy. If the fibroids are small and few in number, you and your doctor may opt for a laparoscopic procedure, which uses slender instruments inserted through small incisions in your abdomen to remove the fibroids from your uterus. Your doctor views your abdominal area on a remote monitor via a small camera attached to one of the instruments.
      Hysteroscopic myomectomy. This procedure may be an option if the fibroids are contained inside the uterus (submucosal). A long, slender scope (hysteroscope) is passed through your vagina and cervix and into your uterus. Your doctor can see and remove the fibroids through the scope. This procedure is best performed by a doctor experienced in this technique.

      Variations of myomectomy in which uterine fibroids are destroyed without actually removing them include:
      Myolysis. In this laparoscopic procedure, an electric current destroys the fibroids and shrinks the blood vessels that feed them.

      Cryomyolysis. In a procedure similar to myolysis, cryomyolysis uses liquid nitrogen to freeze the fibroids.

      The safety, effectiveness and associated risk of fibroid recurrence of myolysis and cryomyolysis have yet to be determined.
      Endometrial ablation. This treatment, performed with a hysteroscope, uses heat to destroy the lining of your uterus, either ending menstruation or reducing your menstrual flow. Endometrial ablation is effective in stopping abnormal bleeding, but doesn't affect fibroids outside the interior lining of the uterus.

      Uterine artery embolization
      Small particles injected into the arteries supplying the uterus cut off blood flow to fibroids, causing them to shrink. This technique is proving effective in shrinking fibroids and relieving the symptoms they can cause. Advantages over surgery include:
      No incision
      Shorter recovery time

      Complications may occur if the blood supply to your ovaries or other organs is compromised.

      Focused ultrasound surgery
      MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October 2004, is a newer treatment option for women with fibroids. Unlike other fibroid treatment options, FUS is noninvasive and preserves your uterus.

      This procedure is performed while you're inside of a specially crafted MRI scanner that allows doctors to visualize your anatomy, and then locate and destroy (ablate) fibroids inside your uterus without making an incision. Focused high-frequency, high-energy sound waves are used to target and destroy the fibroids. A single treatment session is done in an on- and off-again fashion, sometimes spanning several hours. Initial results with this technology are promising, but its long-term effectiveness is not yet known.

      Before you decide
      Because fibroids aren't cancerous and usually grow slowly, you have time to gather information before making a decision about if and how to proceed with treatment. The option that's right for you depends on a number of factors, including the severity of your signs and symptoms, your plans for childbearing, how close you are to menopause, and your feelings about surgery.

      Before making a decision, consider the pros and cons of all available treatment options in relation to your particular situation. Remember, most women don't need any treatment for uterine fibroids.

      Feel free to write to me or visit
      www.medicguide.org
      this is a site done by me and my doctor friends to answer all your health queries for free...

  35. QUESTION:
    Hysterectomy for endometriosis?
    Two months ago had my right ovary removed due to a 15cm mass. They found that I had advanced endometriosis, but at the time, only removed the one ovary. Now after two months, I am having pain everyday on the right side, and now pain on the left side. I had an ultrasound today, that revealed a thick endometrium, but no cysts or masses on the left side. I started taking Seasonique a couple weeks after the surgery to control the endometriosis, but it doesn't seem to be working since I am having so much pain. My Dr. seems to think it is either adhesions or more endo. I am thinking endo since I am having pain on the left side, and they did no surgery on the left side. The options I have been given are Lupron (which I will not consider due to the side effects), and hysterectomy. I do not plan to have children, but wondering if these are my only options? I really do not want to take hormones, but I cannot endure the pain any longer, and simply cannot take narcotics everyday. I'm 36.
    The Dr. did not do a hysterectomy at the time because I told her I wanted to avoid HRT at all costs (my mom had a terrible time). At the time, the left ovary was ok. The surgery was done because of the mass, the endo was discovered when the mass was removed. I'm baffled why I have more pain now then I did with a 15cm mass, and just two months after surgery. I considered waiting it out to see if it would get better on Seasonique, but the pain is getting worse, not better.

    • ANSWER:
      LISTEN TO ME. Please. I am only adamant about this because I'm 39 years old and just had a hysterectomy myself. I, too, have endometriosis. I just had my uterus, one ovary AND even an appendix removed because mine was so bad (but I never wanted kids, so it's cool).

      I can't give you a medical opinion because each case is so unique. However, get more than one opinion (I had 4 and Aetna covered every one of them), do your research and the thing I was going to tell you is read up on MSM. It's a supplement. The long name is methylsulfonylmethane. As I was home on disability and doing research, I found amazing things about it. I get it at Whole Foods in NJ, but you can find it at any vitamin or health foods store. You can't overdose on it as you literally "pee it out" in 12 hours, it's just a form of sulfur. I began reading up on it as I was vain and didn't want to have a terrible scar. It was an ingredient in a cleanser that my dermatologist recommended and it cleared my skin so well, I wanted to know more.

      What I found is that it aids in pain relief immensely, helps patients heal quicker after surgery, and get this - side effects are healthier hair and nails. I got out the hospital March 25th and until this day, I haven't so much as taken a Tylenol for pain. NOTHING. I hadn't even noticed until a few weeks ago (since I was on disability and sitting in front of my pc most of the day) that even my beginning signs of carpal tunnel have completely ceased.

      I take 3000 mg a day. MSM was used for people with tennis elbow, knee problems, etc. I have found the pain relief phenomenal. My boyfriend who practices martial arts and is a few years older than me started taking it and says he has noticed an improvement in his performance without pain.

      Please, do your research and look into it. I suffered with pain of endometrios right up until the day I closed my eyes on the surgeon's table and today my hair is ultra healthy, I don't even bother to wrap my nails anymore (extra cash in my pockets) and after major surgery haven't even had an aspirin. We're about the same age. It's not too late to learn.

      I don't want to bog you down with links, but check out these to start you off. You still need to see a doctor to find out what's going on inside your body, but you can possibly relieve much of the pain you're experiencing.

      I won't leave my email address here, but you can go to my profile and if you want to contact me, feel free. I know what you mean about the pain.

      Good luck, Sweetie!

  36. QUESTION:
    This question is for Women with or have recently been diagnosised with Endometriosis.?
    I'm a mother of 4 that had a tubal ligation 6 years ago and have been semi-diagnoised with Endo. THey are scheduling me for an ultrasound and determining whether i should have surgery because all other methods seem to not be doing anything. I'm having severe cramping, bleeding, headaches, sex drive is low and fatigue increases as it nears to my periods. I'm even experiencing no periods at times. I just started back on a cycle from not having one for 3 months almost. IF any woman have experienced these symptoms and know that this is Endo and can tell me what it is that I can do please let me know what i should do next.
    Yes they want to do a exploritory surgery (laproscopy). My dr. doesn't want to do that but she says if the hormones aren't working then that's the last option and she's not considering a hysterectomy, but having the surgery for me is risky since the last ime I had one they couldn't put me to sleep or put a breathing tube down my throat. I can't afford to see another doctor don't have insurance. Yes the cramps are bad to the point i have to call in at times. I just need some help.

    • ANSWER:
      I was diagnosised with Endometriosis 8 years ago through laproscopy. I was then put on Lupron for 6 months. Then I went on fertility drugs for several years trying to get pregnant. Which didn't happen. Then three years ago I started having all the symtoms you are having.The Dr. did an ultrasound and saw a large mass on my left ovary. He sent me to a cancer Dr. who removed the mass and found out it was endometriosis wraped all the way around my ovary. I still wanted to get pregnant so I went back on fertility meds till 4 months ago when I started having symtoms all over again. It is now on my other ovary and now I also have a large fibroid. I have surgery 4/19 to deal with this. The Dr. is going to try and just remove the endometriosis and fibroid if he can't safely then I will be having a hysterectomy. If I didn't want a baby I would be all for the hysterectomy because I know in a few years the endometriosis will be right back. Endometriosis reocures after you stop treatment until menopause. If they have put you on Lupron and it hasn't helped all I know to do would be surgery. Since you arn't going to have anymore children I would say a hysterectomy would be the best thing to do. This would at least keep you from having to have another surgery in a few years.

  37. QUESTION:
    large, 7cm ovarian cyst?
    My mother has a history with fibroids. About 10 years ago she had half of her ovaries removed because of a benign cyst. About 2 years ago she underwent surgery to have fibroids removed since they always caused her tremendous pain. Ultrasound showed that there were still traces of them left, but nothing big and concerning. Recently, she has been getting horrible pain around her period that hurts so much it weakens her to almost warrant the ER. She did an ultrasound and the doctors found a 7cm tumor near her cervix (grown that big in a matter of 2 years?). I am so, so worried for her right now. Could anyone tell me what this could mean?

    • ANSWER:
      this might mean nothing serious...the cyst can cause tremendous pain around ovulation or time for the period to come. The "tumor" might turn out to be a misread. I had a "mass" of so many centimeters found near my cervix...when I went to the oncologist, he told me the tech (who reads ultrasounds all day long) read my ultrasound wrong. The "mass' turned out to be a Nabothian cyst, blocking part of the entrance to my cervix. this type of cyst is hardened mucous and eventually went away on its own. In the past I had painful cysts on my ovaries but did nothing about them but suffer in silence. If a woman is prone to cysts, this might just turn out to be another cyst. The ultrasound is only the first tool they use to see what's going on in there...but I would wait and see what a further exam reveals. cysts can be very very painful...cancer ( my sister had hysterectomy, endometrial cancer) can be virtually painless but cause a lot of heavy bleeding. So stay optimistic and see what it turns out to be.

  38. QUESTION:
    if a woman has ovarian cyst that are painful, what is her best solution medically?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      Watchful waiting. In many cases you can wait and be re-examined to see if the cyst goes away on its own within a few months. This is typically an option regardless of your age if you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a small, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.
      Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.

      Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing, or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. In some circumstances, your doctor may suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will likely advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. Your doctor is also likely to recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  39. QUESTION:
    Why does my lower abdomen hurt?
    I had an ultrasound done because I went to my dr. with discomfort and tenderness in my abdomen that I related with my bladder. My bladder also felt uncomfortable after I urinated (almost as if there were a cramp) so I associated this discomfort with some sort of bladder infection. My urine analysis showed no infection but did indicate some irritation so my dr sent me to get an ultrasound of my kidneys and bladder and intructed me to stop taking the ibprofen that I had been taking in mass quanitities for a long period of time for my tooth pain. I stopped taking the ibprofen and after the weekend the discomfort and pain had gone away. I still got the ultrasound done and my kidneys and bladder were normal but they found a cyst on my left ovary. This made sense because I had been experiencing pain in that area as well. I went to my obgyn for the cyst and they basically just said that it should go away on its own. A couple weeks later, my lower abdomen began bothering me again. It felt a little bit crampy and uncomfortable. I was also very bloated but I was constipated so I wasn't sure if that had anything to do with it. Orgasm made the discomfort increase and there was also tenderness. This discomfort wasn't on any particular location (right or left) just the entire general lower abdominal region. This discomfort is seemed different than that of the first time, However there was additional direct pain in on the left side as there was before. The next day (yesturday) I dealt with the discomfort all day because it wasn't that bad but it just distracted me because I was worried. Later in the evening we were playing games with friends and all of a sudden the level of discomfort turned to direct pain. It felt like a cramp or like there was a knot in the middle of my lower abdomen. I did feel a similar pain of a much more intense level when I was having my daughter, but it was more to one side and not in the middle. After a while of panicking and wondering if I should brave the ice storm to go the emergency room, the pain somewhat faded to a much duller crampy-discomfort. I did some reading online about what women feel when they have a cyst burst and I'm not sure if this is what happened. Today the discomfort is still there but I am no longer constipated so I'm hoping I ruled this out as a possible cause. Also, the right side of my lower abdomen now hurts as the left side did before in conjunction with the all-over pelvic pain. I've read that when the cyst bursts that the liquid can cause pain in the entire abdominal region, and I've also read of them causing infection?! I know my doc said that the cyst would be the most painful during ovulation and I believe that is where I should be on my cycle. Does anyone have any advice or any information they can give me?

    • ANSWER:
      i suggest going to the doctor again and getting the cyst removed. my mother had the same thing and she waited too long and had to get emergency surgery. ask your doctor if surgery is an option because i really recommend it.

  40. QUESTION:
    Help I've been experiencing pain in my right ovary and in my right leg?

    could it be cancer (ovarian cancer)
    just had my period five days a go

    • ANSWER:
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many ovarian cysts don't cause symptoms. Others can cause

      * pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdomen pelvic pain
      * dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      * problems passing urine completely
      *pain during sex
      * weight gain
      * pain during your period
      * abnormal bleeding
      * nausea or vomiting
      * breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      * pain with fever and vomiting
      * sudden, severe abdominal pain
      * faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      * rapid breathing

      How are ovarian cysts found?
      Doctors most often find ovarian cysts during routine pelvic exams. The doctor may feel the swelling of a cyst on the ovary. Once a cyst is found, tests are done to help plan treatment. Tests include:

      An ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see the cyst's:

      shape, size, location, mass if it is fluid-filled, solid, or mixed

      A pregnancy test. This test may be given to rule out pregnancy.
      Hormone level tests. Hormone levels may be checked to see if there are hormone-related problems.
      A blood test. This test is done to find out if the cyst may be cancerous. The test measures a substance in the blood called cancer-antigen 125 (CA-125). The amount of CA-125 is higher with ovarian cancer. But some ovarian cancers don't make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. Some noncancerous diseases also raise CA-125 levels. Those diseases include uterine fibroids (YOO-tur-ihn FEYE-broidz) and endometriosis. Noncancerous causes of higher CA-125 are more common in women younger than 35. Ovarian cancer is very rare in this age group. The CA-125 test is most often given to women who:
      * are older than 35
      * are at high risk for ovarian cancer
      * have a cyst that is partly solid

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. If you have a cyst, you may be told to wait and have a second exam in 1 to 3 months. Your doctor will check to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who:

      are in their childbearing years
      have no symptoms
      have a fluid-filled cyst
      It may be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. Your doctor may want to remove the cyst if you are postmenopausal, or if it:

      doesn't go away after several menstrual cycles
      gets larger
      looks odd on the ultrasound
      causes pain
      The two main surgeries are:

      Laparoscopy (lap-uh-ROSS-kuh-pee) done if the cyst is small and looks benign (noncancerous) on the ultrasound. While you are under general anesthesia, a very small cut is made above or below your navel. A small instrument that acts like a telescope is put into your abdomen. Then your doctor can remove the cyst.

      Laparotomy (lap-uh-ROT-uh-mee) done if the cyst is large and may be cancerous. While you are under general anesthesia, larger incisions are made in the stomach to remove the cyst. The cyst is then tested for cancer. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to take out the ovary and other tissues, like the uterus. If only one ovary is taken out, your body is still fertile and can still produce estrogen.

      Birth control pills. If you keep forming functional cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to stop you from ovulating. If you don t ovulate, you are less likely to form new cysts. You can also use Depo-Provera . It is a hormone that is injected into muscle. It prevents ovulation for 3 months at a time.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      No, ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. The good news is that most cysts:

      don't cause symptoms
      are not cancerous
      go away on their own
      Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice:

      changes in your period
      pain in the pelvic area
      any of the major symptoms of cysts

      When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?
      Most functional ovarian cysts occur during childbearing years. And most of those cysts are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50 70) with ovarian

  41. QUESTION:
    Is it possible for a lot of uterine tissue be left after a hysterectomy?
    2 years ago I had a supracervical hysterectomy (still have cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes). I recently had a few ultrasounds to try and sleuth out a reason for intermittent bleeding and the transabdominal image showed a mass of tissue 7 cm wide just above my cervix. My doctor, whom I usually trust, first acted puzzled but then declined to address it. When I asked if I should be concerned about it he told me that he didn't think it was anything. That if I had remaining uterine tissue, for instance, I would be bleeding more. PLUS, he was the one who had removed my uterus so there's no way that there'd be that much tissue left.

    I guess my real question is: Is it safe to assume that - because my doctor isn't alarmed - this 7 cm of "stuff" is nothing to worry about?

    • ANSWER:
      This scenario raises a whole lot of questions.
      The first are, how old are you and why did you have the hysterectomy? These may be very important in coming to an answer. For example: if we assume that you were postmenopausal when you had this done then why were your ovaries left behind? They would serve no purpose. If your hysterectomy was done for either a pre-cancerous or cancerous condition, why was the cervix left?

      However, for the sake of answering your question I ll assume that your hysterectomy was done for a benign condition, e.g., fibroids and that you were well pre-menopausal, i.e., <45 years.

      My first question would be: "Why was your cervix left?" in other words what was the reason for doing a supra-cervical hysterectomy? This operation was originally devised to be done by those who were not well experienced in doing a total hysterectomy; by leaving the cervix, one doesn t need to dissect as far down and therefore the risk of injury to the bladder and the ureters is minimised. How experienced was your surgeon? Hopefully he has done at least a few hundred total hysterectomies.

      The cervix serves no purpose other than being the "neck of the womb" and to hold a pregnancy in the uterus. No uterus, therefore, no need for a cervix.

      With a cervix you are still at risk for the development of cervical cancer which could have been avoided had your cervix been removed. Furthermore, if you had never had an abnormal Pap smear in the past you could, with relative safety, have stopped having Pap smears following a total hysterectomy.

      Ideally when a sub-total (supra-cervical) hysterectomy is performed the uterine body is removed from the cervix at the junction of the uterine cavity with the cervix. This junction is not visible, it s inside the uterus and so can only be estimated by the surgeon from outside. If the transection is done too high then a small bit of the lower uterine body is left which may well contain some endometrium. Therefore, depending on how much is left, this will determine how much subsequent bleeding you get; from spotting to regular cyclical bleeding, although less than used to occur with a period because there is less endometrium to bleed. This of course means that you would still be a potential candidate for endometrial (uterine) cancer and to a very much lesser extent sarcoma.

      My interpretation of your situation is that your surgeon has probably left a sizable part of the lower uterine body and that is why you have the bleeding.

      You have two options:
      Put up with the problem and have your regular Pap smears, or Get the residual uterine body and cervix removed, and if over 45 years think about removal of your ovaries (and tubes). However, think about getting it done by a Gyn Oncologist; for them this should be relatively straight forward surgery.

  42. QUESTION:
    eptopic pregancy ...help?
    my last period was in the last week in october(lasted till 1st week in NOV)

    1st week in nov i started being nauseous

    now i haven't received my period yet im having PMS symptoms

    boobs hurt swollen..really bad mood swings etc but no sign of my period -this has been going on for more than a week

    to make it worse im having cramping (muscle spasm like ) pains in the middle of my uterus -this has been going on for about 3 days

    when i look at those symptoms and ectopic pregnancy was the number on because

    i took a few HPT about two weeks ago and they were negative

    should i go to the doc right away or wait it out

    ALL HELPFUL SUGGESTIONS WELCOM
    oh and before i get sarcastic comments i forgot to add that YES i have been having unprotective sex with my boyfriend

    • ANSWER:
      An ectopic pregnancy can give symptoms the same as early pregnancy, but the HCG levels are sometimes too low to produce a positive on a pregnancy test. With my ectopic pregnancy, my periods continued as normal, but I did feel bloated and have a tender abdomen which increased to an emergency room visit. They first thought is was an appendicitis because the pain was very severe. I couldn't even walk the pain was so severe. It had probably been increasing in size for a while because the mass was the size of a grapefruit and the pain was being caused by the tube trying to rupture. My mass had gangrene and had it exploded it could have been very serious. It turned out to be an ectopic pregnancy in the fallopian tube which was removed with surgery after an ultrasound confirmed the mass. At this point, an ultrasound could probably verify whether there is a pregnancy or something abnormal. It might be that you are just fixing to start your period. I think it would be best to consult a doctor just in case it is an ectopic pregnancy. If caught early enough some ectopic pregnancies can be taken care of with just an injection. Good luck. P.S. This was a first "pregnancy", but even with the one tube and ovary removed, I latered delivered two healthy children.

  43. QUESTION:
    Can doctors make this mistake?
    Hi everyone,

    A few weeks ago during an annual ultrasound my gyn found a large mass on my left ovary. (I have PCOS in case that matters)
    She referred me to a gyn surgeon who is also an oncologist. (This doctor works closely with my gyn)
    After seeing him a few weeks later (due to appointment availability) he did a full psychical exam and said he thought it may be endometriosis or fibroid. To be safe he recommended surgery/laser due to it's size; which is 9x10cm. I went in for an MRI and was told I had a large benign tumor in/on my uterus.
    I have my second appointment with the specialist is in a week and was wondering....Is it possible for the mass to move? Is it possible the ultrasound (both internal and outer) and MRI (with & without contrast) would show two different locations?
    Also, there is no free fluid. (If that means something as well)

    I am worried I may have 2 masses?! They are saying I have 1 large mass but US says on my left ovary but the MRI is saying it's on my uterus.

    Please help anyway you can...I am just so worried and in over my head I don't know what to think.

    Thank you for reading.
    @ Heatherc -Thank you so much for answering. I'm 31 with no children. My husband and I would like to have children in the near future; I believe that is one of the biggest reasons the specialist wants to operate; because according to the MRI it's in my uterus.
    I just thought of something while reading your answer....maybe the US wasn't clear and the mass in my uterus is more on the left side? Maybe that's why they said left ovary. But why ovary when it's in my uterus? Ohh I don't know =/ Thanks for answering none the less.

    • ANSWER:
      It's possible that the technician who read the results or the doctor might have misread the films; or it's also possible that the images weren't quite as clear as they need to be and that caused them to read them differently. I don't think the mass itself could move, I've never heard of anything like that. Of course, I'm not a doctor either.

      I can understand being scared about this- anyone would be, especially since it's you're body and it's something wrong in there. I can't tell you that everything will be perfectly fine, but it's likely you will be okay. My mom had a couple of fibroids removed quite a few years ago, and it turned out okay. They did a laparascopic surgery, which only took a couple of hours (maybe 3, it's been a while), and she was in the hospital for a week. It took about three weeks for her to recover before she could go back to work, but she did not have a lot of soreness, and was able to move around pretty normally within about 4 or 5 days. This was in the 90's, when this type of surgery was new; now the same procedure would be a lot easier. I imagine the recovery time would be about half what it was for her. In her case, because she was already near 40 and done having kids, they did a hysterectomy (at her choice) so that there would be no chance for the fibroids to recur...depending on your age, they may give you that choice as well.

      However, I understand that now, for small fibroids, they can sometimes treat them with hormone pills or shots that help shrink them, and presumably they remove them once they reach a certain size. You should discuss with your doctor what options are available to you. I suggest you take time before your appointment to write out your questions clearly so that you will remember them when you go back...and make sure you get the answers you need.

      In the meantime, you could go to www.webmd.com and look up both fibroids and endometriosis to see what the conditions are and how they are treated. This will give you some idea of what you're facing.

      I hope this helps, and I hope everything goes okay for you.

  44. QUESTION:
    any of you who have dealt with Ovarian Cancer or cysts at a young age (29)?
    I had an MRI for a car wreck and it revealed I had a 8 cm mass in my pelvis... I had an ultrasound, and the tech said that the mass looked like a large cyst, fluid filled and cystadneocarcinoma cannot be ruled out. Cyst may be malignant due to size. The tech also mentioned blood flow to it, which I know is bad... I am 29, have a child and have no history in the family of cancer, but that report has me terrified. I am having surgery to remove it next month, but I just fear it is cancer. I know they won't know until they take it out, but is the fact that is is fluid filled good or bad? Any experience with ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      I am sorry that you had to go through this. I had ovarian cysts when I was in my early twenties. It is not that uncommon. I had a large cyst the size of a grapefruit on my ovary, that was probably the largest one I have had. I have had several ultrasounds and it was determined that there was nothing to be concerned about. I am familiar with the ultrasounds and what the tech told you because I have thyroid cancer and went through testing for that as well. If the blood flow to the mass was warm or hot then that is a great sign. If the mass is cold, meaning no blood flow, then that is cause for concern. Cancerous tumors do not have a lot of blood flow. I am surprised that they did not recommend a fine needle biopsy. That can be done fairly easily and you will get the results quickly. Also, the fact that it is fluid filled is a good sign. I understand that they have to tell you that cancer cannot be ruled out. This is true until they go in and take out the mass and send it to pathology. But saying they can't rule it out is not the same as saying that chances are good that it is cancer. They are just being careful which is good.
      I know what you are going through, and my advice is to try to enjoy the summer. Focus on the positive, and take care of yourself. Even if it is cancer, that doesn't mean that it is a death sentence. It is scary for sure, but medicine has come a long way. Take one day at a time and believe you can face any challenge that comes, because you can.

  45. QUESTION:
    is ovarian cyst deadly?
    if you are diagnosed as multicystic and dermoid is your situation can be critical or serious?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it can be deadly. I myself had ovarian cyst, but luckily mines was a size of a nickel. And if it is bigger than that, you will need to get surgery to take it out. Why It Is Done
      Surgery is used to confirm the diagnosis of an ovarian cyst, remove a cyst that is causing symptoms, and rule out ovarian cancer.

      Surgery for an ovarian cyst or growth may be advised in the following situations:

      Ovarian growths (masses) are present in both ovaries.
      An ovarian cyst is larger than 3in..
      An ovarian cyst that is being watched does not get smaller or go away in 2 to 3 months.
      An ultrasound exam suggests that a cyst is not a simple functional cyst.
      You have an ovarian growth and you:
      Have never had a menstrual period (for example, a young girl).
      Have been through menopause (postmenopausal woman).
      Use birth control pills (unless you are using low-dose progestin-only pills or have missed a pill, which would make an ovulation-related functional cyst more likely).
      Your doctor is concerned that ovarian cancer may be present. In this case, it is also advised that you see a gynecologic oncologist.

  46. QUESTION:
    cyst/bloodclot problem?
    I recently had a 13cm cyst removed from my ovary. I am still experiencing pain on my left side, so my dr sent me for an ultrasound. I just got the results back..and have another mass. My dr said they are not sure if it is a blood clot or if it is a cyst, but did say it has cystic properties..so they are sending me for an mri . Do bloodclots have cytic properties??
    Also, how fast do these things grow? i had surgery 3 weeks ago...and it seems soo fast for it to have grown back again.

    Thanks
    anyone????

    • ANSWER:
      Clots do not usually have cystic properties, but there is a kind of cyst that can occur that has blood in it that is called an endometrioma or a chocolate cyst. The reason this is called a chocolate cyst is because when this kind of cyst bursts the blood that comes out is brown and old.

      As for how fast a cyst grows, most cysts are fluid filled and when they are that means that it's not cancer.

      I would recommend talking to your doctor again to ask for further clarification of the results of the ultrasound.

      If you have any questions about having an MRI please feel free to e-mail or IM me off site any time.

  47. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I've already been in pain for two weeks. I can't take anymore. What's gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      Menstrual irregularities
      Pelvic pain a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      Pressure on your rectum or bladder difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  48. QUESTION:
    I have an ovarian cyst!!!!! help?
    K so I was having sex with my boyfriend and I got really sharp pain in my stomach next thing you know i feel like Im about to give birth i go to the ER and they diagnosed me with a ovarian cysts I been having pain still but not as bad .. Do you guys know anything that triggers the pain so i can avoid doing those things ?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      Menstrual irregularities
      Pelvic pain a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      Pressure on your rectum or bladder difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  49. QUESTION:
    ovarian cancer metatasis??!!?
    ok i have ovaqrian cyst the size of a lemon for six months now the size has not changes at all....my doctor says he cant tell me whether it is cancer or not - now i keep getting weird pains in my ribs hip bones and kidney area and the fromt of my chest, i have had a normal ca-125, i am afraid that i do have ovarian cancer and it has spread to my bones and kidneys - could this be true - i am also frequently short of breath
    the cyst is complex

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you have done an Ultrasound to picture the cyst? Is it filled with clear fluid or blood or any internal solid elements?

      Have you had a Doppler Study? This is a special ultrasound measuring the flow of blood to and from the ovary and cyst and may help in deciding if the cyst is actively growing and being fed by the vascular system. If the cyst is found to have solid elements, it s also helpful to get an x-ray which can detect characteristic teeth, bone and/or cartilage in dermoid cysts.

      Finally, a CT scan or MRI can help determine whether the cyst is suspicious for malignancy or whether it s pressing on or invading adjacent organs, lymph glands or blood vessels.

      Most cysts are benign, especially those that occur during the reproductive years. The incidence of ovarian cancer begins to increase after menopause. If there is no significant family history of ovarian cancer or combinations of certain cancers, such as breast, colon, and prostate cancer, you don t have a known genetic risk, and if you are younger than 50, you should be reassured. If the cyst appears on ultrasound to be filled with clear fluid ( a simple cyst), it s less than six centimeters in diameter and you re not in pain, a wait-and-see approach over the next three months is appropriate.

      Know that 90 percent of simple cysts are functional and will disappear after five weeks. Your doctor may repeat the ultrasound to make sure the cyst is gone. If, however, you are over the age of 50 and/or the cyst has solid elements and appears complex (with internal walls), further workup is usually done. This includes a blood test for the protein CA125, which you have done and is normal. That is a good sign but, this test is not foolproof. About 50 percent of early ovarian cancers don t produce detectable amounts of CA125. And non-cancerous diseases such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis can cause mild elevations in the level of the CA125 protein.

      The final diagnosis, especially if the cyst looks suspicious, may have to be surgical via a laparoscopic procedure. The cyst (and sometimes the ovary) will be removed and examined. In women who are menopausal, both ovaries are usually excised in order to prevent recurrences and/or reduce the future risk of ovarian cancer. If the doctor has a very high suspicion of cancer, a laparotomy (an abdominal incision) may be indicated. And if ovarian cancer is found, the surgery usually includes hysterectomy, removal of both ovaries, tubes, adjacent lymph glands and an excision of all visible cancer. This should be scheduled at surgical centers where a specialist in gynecologic cancer surgeries (a gynecologic oncologist) can be present.

      Hope this info helps, it sounds like you should ask your Dr. to do further testing. I agree with you, it is always better to err on the side of caution, whenever there is any question of cancer. It most likely is not cancer but, in my experience, Ovarian Cancer is very difficult to detect & my Gynecologist doesn't even like to use the CA-125 test because of it's unreliability. I also am encouraged by the fact that the cyst isn't growing, but more testing is needed to provide you with a definitive diagnosis. Good luck!

      Edit:
      Here's what I found on complex cyst.

      Differentiating between benign and malignant ovarian masses is necessary because ovarian cancer is lethal, and there are no proven screening techniques. Clinicians must consider the patient's medical profile (ie, risk factors, size of the mass, clinical presentation) to critically evaluate the likelihood of an early ovarian cancer. Diagnostic screening must include three essential components: an accurate medical history, a careful physical examination, and the judicious use of diagnostic procedures (eg, ultrasound, computed tomography [CT] scan, laparoscopy).

      15-year retrospective study reviewed medical records of 72 patients who developed early stage ovarian carcinoma. The study showed that 78% of these patients presented with one or more of the following signs or symptoms:

      * ascites (12.5%),

      * bloatedness or increased abdominal girth (32%),

      * increased CA-125 (approximately 52%),

      * palpable abdominal mass (72%),

      * pelvic pain (35%),

      * simple cyst noted in ultrasound (15%),

      * simple cyst noted on CT scan (17%), and

      * vaginal bleeding (19%).

      A finding of a simple cyst on either ultrasound or CT scan should not be clinically alarming; however, 15% of the women whose ultrasound showed a simple cyst and 17% of the women whose CT scans showed a simple cyst actually had early ovarian carcinoma. These results demonstrate that false negatives are possible with radiological tests for ovarian carcinoma. The interval time from presenting symptom to time of diagnosis is 4.6 months as a result of these false negative results. (22)

      Symptoms usually are associated with the location of the tumor and its effect on surrounding organs. The most common symptoms reported by women found to have ovarian cancer include ascites (ie, peritoneal seeding), abdominal distention/swelling/ bloating/pain/discomfort, dyspepsia, nausea, anorexia, and constipation. (23) Vaginal bleeding may occur if the ovarian tumor is active hormonally. Symptoms tend to be nonspecific and can mimic nongynecological conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Acute abdominal pain should alert the clinician to a possible ectopic pregnancy, ovarian torsion, cyst rupture, or bleeding hemorrhagic cyst.

      Diagnostic screening. When screening for ovarian cancer, clinicians use three main approaches. Clinicians must be aware of other differential diagnoses that can mask an ovarian cancer (Table 2). Limitations, however, exist for all three screening methods. The three screening examinations include

      * transvaginal or pelvic ultrasound,

      * CA-125 tumor marker, and

      * pelvic examination. Pelvic ultrasound can

      * determine ovarian cyst size;

      * differentiate between cystic or solid components including the description of internal echoes and septae;

      * determine whether the cyst is unilocular or multilocular; and

      * describe borders as either regular or irregular.

      Transvaginal sonography provides a better image compared to the transabdominal approach. Radiologists may report a cyst as complex if there is no clear and convincing evidence that the mass is simple in nature because of the fear of missing an ovarian cancer. A CT scan should be considered if malignancy is suspected, or an abdominal flat film may be ordered to rule out a calcified fibroid or teeth from a possible dermoid.

      Neovascularization is characteristic of malignant tumors. Vessels in malignant tumors have an irregular course, fail to taper, and have arterial-venous shunts with high flow velocities. There is low resistance to flow with little systolic versus diastolic variation in blood velocity because of the incomplete muscularization of tumor walls. (24) Doppler scanner sonography has improved the ability to evaluate ovarian cysts for increased vascularity and lower flow impedance to the ovarian cyst, which are possible signs of an early malignancy.

      A recent study of 191 patients demonstrated that preoperative regression analysis of several variables could discriminate accurately between malignant and benign adnexal masses. These useful variables include

      * menopausal status,

      * CA-125 tumor marker,

      * presence of at least one or more papillary growths greater than 3 mm in size, and

      * a color score indicative of increased vascularity and blood flow.

      This regression analysis has a documented sensitivity of 95.9% and specificity of 87.1%. (25) A similar study described the Tumor Ovarian Index as an accurate method for predicting ovarian malignancy of a suspected ovarian mass in the clinical setting. This tool combines age and specific ultrasound markers. (26)

      Intravascular sonogram contrast agents, such as microbubble echo-enhancing contrast agent provide improved visualization of tumor vasculature compared to color doppler sonography as a result of three mechanisms. First, the number of recognizable vessels before and after contrast enhancement was significantly higher in malignant tumors compared to benign ones. Second, the time interval from administration of contrast to its visually detectable effect in tumor vessels was shorter in malignant tumors compared to benign tumors. Third, doppler signal intensity after contrast was higher in malignant tumors than in benign tumors. Sonography-enhanced studies using contrast agents, therefore, are superior to doppler sonography in differentiating between a benign ovarian mass versus a malignant ovarian mass. (27)

      Tissues derived from coelomic epithelium produce the antigen CA-125 tumor marker. Only 80% of ovarian epithelial carcinomas produce CA-125; therefore, some women with ovarian cancer will have normal CA-125 levels or false-negative sera tests. (28) The CA-125 antigen also is expressed by various other pathologic and normal tissues of mullerian (ie, mesodermal) origin (Table 3). The CA-125 antigen has a low specificity, especially in premenopausal women. In women younger than 50 years of age, an elevated CA-125 is associated with a malignant mass less than 25% of the time compared to women older than age 50 with an elevated CA-125 who have a malignancy 80% of the time. (29)

      Based on its lack of specificity, no recommendation can be made to order an annual CA-125 on all women as part of screening for ovarian cancer. Testing for CA-125 is best reserved for postmenopausal women with an identified adnexal mass found on either routine pelvic examination or on pelvic ultrasound. It also can be effective in detecting relapse of a known ovarian cancer and for monitoring during primary therapy in women being treated for ovarian cancer. (30) Detection of a truly early ovarian cancer is not pos

  50. QUESTION:
    Extremely irregular period? (I've had it 4 times in a row, only a week off inbetween each one)?
    please don't answer this question without reading all of the info.

    So this has really been worrying me. I have no idea what could be causing this. A few obvious ones that I know of, is that I "could" be pregnant, or cysts, because those can cause that. However, I'm posting about this, because both of those possibilities are pretty much ruled out.

    Reason 1.

    Okay so I have a massive cyst that branches off from my right ovary into my entire abdomen. It distends it 26cm, making it actually visible. (I get comments asking if Im pregnant, and to be honest, it does look this way. It looks like im around 14 weeks. However, my stomach has been this way for years. I've always had a naturally flat stomach, but as soon as I hit 13, it started growing, becoming plump, and not like natural fat, it was harder and honestly did look like a baby bump. It grew the years after. However, I never got it checked out because I was young, and then I thought it must be normal. But nope, according to the ultrasound and MRI, without this mass, I would be flat. So im 17 now, and I've had this cyst for that long, why would it only start making my periods messed up now? (I am by the way scheduled for surgery in a few weeks, but this has been bothering me so much and Im anxious so I posted this)

    Reason 2.

    I really don't think I could be pregnant because well 1, I use protection. And obviously, I know accidents happen. However, in the past 3 months, I've had numerous tests done which would have showed if I was pregnant, and they never did. (This includes an ultrasound, MRI, Blood work, pee tests, the whole nine yards, they tested for many many reasons but they even said this will also show if im pregnant just to make sure that isn't a possibility at this time, and it wasn't) So it's been a good 3 weeks since the last time I was at a doctors, gynaecologist, or the hospital. So the only way I could be pregnant, is if a condom failed. (Sorry if that's too much info) Which i guess is possible but ive always used them properly.

    So basically, I had my period when I normally should, at the end of the last month. And then I had about 8 days off, and had it for another 4 days! And it wasn't spotting, like I know the difference. It was actually a heavy flow, cramping and everything. Then I had a weak off again, had it again, normal period. Okay, so then I had another 8 days off, and now I have it again. But this is when I'd normally get it. (Sometime near the end of a month, or beginning of the next month) So the first one, and this one should be the normal ones, but whats with those two weird ones in the middle?

    Sorry for all this info, just trying to get real answers , Like I KNOW pregnancy is an option, and that my cyst can cause it too. But if that weren't it, and I dont think it is, I would like to know what could cause it besides those. Thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      Okay the first thing I would recommend is that you go see your doctor asap. You need to have the cyst removed immediately. It could be interfering with your regular period and could quite possibly lead to an infection of your ovaries if not treated. But it is doubtful that you are pregnant. If you keep getting your period your fine but that cyst has to go.


surgery to remove mass on ovary ultrasound