Tag Archives: dermoid cyst

Benign Cyst On Ovaries Ovarian Cysts

Benign tumors which grow within the ovaries of young women or those in their child bearing years are dermoid cysts. It comprises about one-third of benign tumors that have been diagnosed on a yearly basis and is also known as benign mature cystic teratomas.

Even if they are benign, they can likewise become cancerous. This is a rare situation but if ignored, it could result in serious problems.

Complex and Functional are the 2 kinds of ovarian cysts and a dermoid cyst will fall under the complex type. Not like other cysts which consist of fluids, a dermoid cyst contains solid elements like fat, teeth, nails, hair follicles and bones. This can seem weird but in view of the fact that the source of the cyst is developed from an egg, any type of human tissue can grow.

A lot of women usually develop dermoid cysts. They are normally undetected since they don't show any symptoms and can disappear even if they were not treated. A pelvic examination is the normal way of finding out if you have dermoid cysts.

However, there are times that the cyst could get bigger. This type of cyst could actually grow as much as fifteen centimeters. You would usually experience severe pain in your stomach when the cyst twists. This could also prevent blood flow and cause other complications.

The most helpful way to treat ovarian cysts is the natural holistic method in view of the fact that it tackles and treats the root cause. The cyst would not come back if the root cause is treated. This is really the real reason why a lot of women and doctors dealing with whichever type of ovarian cyst prefer this method.

Not like in various cyst cases, a dermoid cyst is an exception. It is not certain that a natural holistic method will indeed treat a dermoid cyst. That being said, a surgery is normally the only method to get rid of it.

A dermoid cyst does not have fluids but solid elements. A sac filled with fluids normally disappears as soon as the root cause is treated. Nonetheless, a cyst containing solid elements should be removed through a surgical procedure.

On the other hand, there is likewise a chance that a dermoid cyst will come back after a surgical treatment. This part could be prevented by applying the natural holistic method which corrects the internal balance. So if you or anyone you know have any kind of cyst then try the natural holistic method.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Bad pains! Ovarian cyst?
    My grandma is currently suffering very bad pains on her lower left side. She can walk but not without being in a great amount of pain. She was diagnosed with a ovarian cyst about a week ago. She is being sick and the pain is going from the lower front side round to her kidney on the left side.
    What could be the cause and what should I do.
    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are benign and naturally go away on their own without treatment. These cysts cause little, if any, symptoms. But in a rare case, your doctor may detect a cancerous cystic ovarian mass during a routine examination.
      Ovarian torsion is another rare complication of ovarian cysts. This is when a large cyst causes an ovary to twist or move from its original position. Blood supply to the ovary is cut off, and if not treated, it can cause damage or death to the ovarian tissue. Although uncommon, ovarian torsion accounts for nearly 3 percent of emergency gynecological surgeries.
      Ruptured cysts, which are also rare, can cause intense pain and internal bleeding. This complication increases your risk of an infection and can be life-threatening if left untreated.
      Diagnosing an Ovarian Cyst | Diagnosis
      Your doctor can detect an ovarian cyst during a routine pelvic examination. He or she may notice swelling on one of your ovaries and order an ultrasound to confirm the presence of a cyst. An ultrasound is an imaging test that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce an image of your internal organs. Ultrasounds help determine the size, location, shape, and composition (solid or fluid-filled) of a cyst.
      Other imaging tools used to diagnose ovarian cysts include:
      CT scan: a body imaging device used to create cross-sectional images of internal organs
      MRI: a test that uses magnetic fields to produce in-depth images of internal organs
      Ultrasound: an imaging device used to visualize the ovary
      Because the majority of cysts disappear after a few weeks or months, your doctor may not immediately recommend a treatment plan. Instead, he or she may repeat the ultrasound in a few weeks or months to check your condition.
      If there aren t any changes in your condition or if the cyst increases in size, your doctor will request additional tests to determine other causes of your symptoms.
      They include:
      pregnancy test: to determine whether or not you re pregnant
      hormone level test: to check for hormone-related issues, such as too much estrogen or progesterone
      CA 125 Blood test: to screen for ovarian cancer
      Read more

      Treatment for an Ovarian Cyst
      If a cyst does not go away on its own or if it grows larger, your doctor may recommend treatment to shrink or remove the cyst.
      Birth Control Pills
      If you suffer from recurrent ovarian cysts, your doctor can prescribe oral contraceptives to stop ovulation and prevent the development of new cysts. Oral contraceptives can also reduce your risk of ovarian cancer. The risk of ovarian cancer is higher in postmenopausal women.
      Laparoscopy
      If your cyst is small and an imaging test rules out cancer, your doctor can perform a laparoscopy to surgically remove the cyst. The procedure involves your doctor making a tiny incision near your navel and then inserting a small instrument into your abdomen to remove the cyst.
      Laparotomy
      If you have a large cyst, he or she can surgically remove the cyst through a large incision in your abdomen. Your doctor will conduct an immediate biopsy, and if he or she determines that the cyst is cancerous, he or she may perform a hysterectomy to remove your ovaries and uterus.

  2. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    What does it mean to have an ovarian cyst without fluid? What is it filled with if anything? Please help with as much information as you have or websites I can go to and read about this !
    I have had cyst throughout the past few years but lately i have had intense pain and went to the GYN after having a CT scan of my abdomen. I am going for a ultrasound next week. But when I went she told me that this was found on my CT scan and she just wants to cofirm it before she gives me any medical treatment.

    Don't tell me to go see my doctor for this cause I already have.

    • ANSWER:
      WHAT ARE OVARIAN CYSTS?
      An ovarian cyst is simply a collection of fluid within the normally solid ovary. There are many different types of ovarian cysts, and they are an extremely common gynecologic problem. Because of the fear of ovarian cancer, cysts are a common cause of concern among women. But, it is important to know that the vast majority of ovarian cysts are not cancer. However, some benign cysts will require treatment in that they do not go away by themselves, and in quite rare cases, others may be cancerous. A cyst may cause discomfort or may be discovered at the time of a routine examination, when you are feeling absolutely fine. The good news is that almost all ovarian cysts will go away by themselves without any treatment. Since the vast majority of ovarian cysts are benign, the presence of an ovarian cyst is a usually a non-worrisome occurrence.

      WHAT CAUSES MOST OVARIAN CYSTS?
      The most common types of ovarian cysts are called functional cysts, which result from a collection of fluid forming around a developing egg. Every woman who is ovulating will form a small amount of fluid around the developing egg each month. The combination of the egg, the special fluid-producing cells, and the fluid is called a follicle and is normally about the size of a pea. For unknown reasons, the cells that surround the egg occasionally form too much fluid, and this straw colored fluid expands the ovary from within. If the collection of fluid gets to be larger than a normal follicle, about three-quarters of an inch in diameter, a follicular cyst is said to be present. If fluid continues to be formed, the ovary is stretched as if a balloon was being filled up with water. The normally white covering of the ovary becomes thin and smooth and appears as a bluish-grey. Follicular cysts may rarely become as large as 3 or 4 inches. The majority of these cysts, even the large ones, go away after a month or two as the extra fluid dissolves back into the blood stream.

      At the time of ovulation, the covering of the ovary tears open in order to release the egg. Within hours, this covering heals, and the cells in the ovary form a structure called the corpus luteum. The corpus luteum produces progesterone, the hormone that prepares the uterine lining cells for the arrival of the fertilized egg. Every menstruating woman, every month, forms a corpus luteum. However, cells can produce fluid within the corpus luteum and form a cyst. While a corpus luteum cyst is usually no larger than a small marble, sometimes so much fluid is produced that a cyst of a few inches results. The good news is that, like follicular cysts, practically all corpus luteum cysts will go away by themselves in a few weeks. Follicular cysts and corpus luteum cysts are collectively referred to as functional cysts.

      A number of other types of ovarian cysts can form as a result of the abnormal growth of other cells contained in the ovary. These cysts are less common and are discussed later in this chapter.

      WHAT CAN A SONOGRAM SHOW?
      The most accurate way to get a picture of the ovary and cyst is with a vaginal sonogram. This test uses a small instrument which is comfortably passed into the vagina. This instrument bounces harmless sound waves off your uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries, forming a picture on a monitor. A sonogram allows the doctor to accurately determine the size of the cyst and to "see" inside it in order to detect whether it is filled with fluid or solid areas. This can help determine the type of cyst that is present. Certain types of ovarian cysts, depending on which cells in the ovary are overgrowing, will make fairly reliable patterns on a sonogram. In performing the sonogram, one concern is to look for ovarian cancer. Abnormal cysts often will have an overgrowth of cells that stick out from the inside of the cyst wall, making the inside of the cyst appear jagged on the sonogram. Still, many of these irregularly shaped cysts are benign, but cancer can also appear this way. Unfortunately, the sonogram cannot make a definite diagnosis of benign vs. malignant cysts. So, if the sonogram shows solid areas within a cyst, surgery will be needed to remove it.

      CAN LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY BE USED TO TREAT AN OVARIAN CYST?
      Instruments are now available that enable the gynecologist to remove a cyst through small incisions in the abdomen. This type of procedure, known as laparoscopic surgery, provides the benefits of outpatient surgery and a quick recovery. Using a telescope placed through the navel and small instruments placed near the pubic bone, the gynecologic surgeon can remove either the cyst alone or the entire ovary.

      An ovarian cyst, which looks like a small balloon filled with water, grows from within the ovary and stretches the normal ovarian tissue over it. Removing the cyst, called a cystectomy, is like taking a clam out of the shell. The thinned out ovarian tissue is cut open, and the cyst is gently peeled away from inside the ovary. The cyst fluid is then removed with a suction device. The cyst now looks like a deflated balloon and can easily be removed through the small laparoscopy incision. If a cyst has destroyed all the normal ovarian tissue, it may be necessary to remove the entire ovary. A number of ways have been developed to allow the removal of the entire ovary with the laparoscope. Using either special sutures or surgical staples, the blood vessels going to the ovary can be tied, and the ovary cut away and removed. In most situations, the operating time for laparoscopic surgery takes no longer than standard surgery. However, the benefit of laparoscopic surgery is that you may leave the hospital the same day and return to normal activity within a week or two.

  3. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    Do anyone know of any major problems that come with having cysts on your ovaries and does it stop you from having children

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid within the ovary. Some of these, called functional cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about 2 centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. Specific types of cyst include graafian follicles (which may rupture at mid-cycle and cause mittelschmerz) or corpus luteum cysts (which may rupture about the time of menstruation, and take up to three months to disappear entirely). Other cysts are pathological, such as those found in polycystic ovary syndrome, or those associated with tumors.

      Symptoms

      * Dull pain in the lower abdomen or discomfort
      * Fullness or bloating
      * Pain during sexual intercourse, masturbation or exercise
      * Irregular periods or spotting
      * Change in frequency of urination or difficulty with bowel movements due to pressure on adjacent pelvic anatomy
      * Fatigue
      * Increased level of testosterone or hair growth
      * Death at young ages if not treated properly

      Treatment

      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign; those that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where other family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

  4. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a doctor appt. next week, bt just wondering if this sounds like one. Very irregular periods, almost certain i am not pregnant, painful sex, bloating, sharp pains and cramping in lower left side of my stomach. just wondering if this sounds like I may have a cyst? thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have them also and here is some information that helped me

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.
      What causes ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.
      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).
      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?

      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

  5. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst laparotomy?
    I have to see a gyno-oncologist on the 18th to schedule a surgery on my right ovary for a large cyst. Its about 8 to 10 CM.
    My gyno said it looks like a dermoid and that it is probably benign, the only reason she referred me to the oncologist was due to its size.
    I have no symptoms or pain. And I am hoping for a Laporoscpy!!!
    BUT she told me that due to its size a Laporotomy might have to be done instead!!! What does this mean? I know its a larger incision, but just how much more Recovery time is needed after a laporotomy???
    Will I be able to drive? Sex? Does anyone have any personal experience? Please le tme know I'm sooo nervous!!!

    I'm also 23 yrs old.

    • ANSWER:
      I had a laparotomy to remove an ovary & fallopian tube, due to a cyst that torted, & i have also had a few laparoscopies too.
      The laparoscopies, you spend 1 day in hospital, you will have maybe 1 or 2 stitches.It takes about only a week to get over & you can drive as soon as the anaesthetic has worn off. With a laparotomy you stay in hospital for 3 days & have alot of internal stitching as well as external. You cannot drive, lift anything or do most things for at least six weeks & you feel very sore & uncomfortable for at least 2 weeks. The scar looks horrible to start with but gradually becomes hardly noticable.

      Kim W - I had mine 15 yrs ago, when i was about 27. I was rushed to hospital & operated on as an emergency 3 days later. The cyst had torted, twisted the ovary & fallopian tube & cut off the blood supply to my uterus. I have never felt pain like it before, & i had already given birth to 3 children !!! .... I had introvenous painkiller for the 3 days before op & that just took the sharp edge off of the pain.

  6. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts & More?
    I was just diagnosed with 2 cysts on my right ovary,
    and a thickening of the uterine lining in one area. The
    doctor gave me some meds to take for a while, but I'm
    still unsure of the whole thing.
    I did have a biopsy done, and am waiting for results.
    Has anyone else had this?
    If so, what was done to correct it?

    Thanks for answering.

    • ANSWER:
      What are ovarian cysts?
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. Clomid or Serophene, which are drugs used to induce ovulation, can raise the risk of getting this type of cyst. These cysts are almost never associated with cancer.

      There are also other types of cysts:

      * Endometriomas. These cysts develop in women who have endometriosis, when tissue from the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus. The tissue may attach to the ovary and form a growth. These cysts can be painful during sexual intercourse and during menstruation.
      * Cystadenomas. These cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      * Dermoid cysts. The cells in the ovary are able to make hair, teeth, and other growing tissues that become part of a forming ovarian cyst. These cysts can become large and cause pain.
      * Polycystic ovaries. The eggs mature within the follicles, or sacs, but the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. The cycle repeats, follicles continue to grow inside the ovary, and cysts form. For more information about polycystic ovaries, refer to our FAQ on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      * Laparoscopy if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.
      * Laparotomy if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.

      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      Ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. Fortunately, the vast majority of cysts don t cause any symptoms, are not related to cancer, and go away on their own. Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice any changes in your period, pain in the pelvic area, or any of the major symptoms listed above. A pelvic exam, possibly with an ultrasound, can help determine if a cyst is causing the problem. If a woman is not seeking pregnancy and develops functional cysts, frequently, future cysts may be prevented by taking oral contraceptives, Depo-Provera, or Norplant.
      When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?

      Functional ovarian cysts usually occur during the childbearing years. Most often, cysts in women of this age group are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50-70) with ovarian cysts have a higher risk of ovarian cancer. At any age, if you think you have a cyst, it s important to tell your doctor.

      For More Information...
      You can find out more about ovarian cysts by contacting the National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC) at 800-994-9662 or the following organizations:

  7. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    What is the normal size of an ovarian cyst? And how large does it have to be before it is considered abnormal? Also what does it mean if fluid is seen when you have an ultrasound done ?

    • ANSWER:
      Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed. Ovarian cysts have nothing to do with disease. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment.
      A woman may develop 1 or more of them.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can benign ovarian cysts cause infertility and how to treat them?
    I have two ovarian cysts and they are not cancerous. They cause allot of pain and often burst, making me feel sick. If I got them removed through surgery would it scar my ovary and make me unable to have kids later in life?

    • ANSWER:
      My wife went through a similar decision. She tried a method she read about online and she was amazed. Here is the link to her blog. You can check out the method she used through a link at the bottom of each post.
      http://ovarian-cyst-help.blogspot.com/

  9. QUESTION:
    Possible cyst on ovary?
    Possible cyst on ovary?
    I was examined about 3.5 weeks ago and the Dr informed me that she thought I may have a cyst on my left ovary, I have been referred to have an ultrasound scan and given Ibuprofen 600mg to take 3x daily.
    The pain is now constant and not relieved with any painkillers, I'm also having sharp shooting pains.Went to see the Dr yesterday morn. She has given me stronger painkillers, and sent me for more blood tests, CRP and CA125 , and fast tracking the scan. Was also discovered that I have a water infection, so on antibiotics for that. I'm really worried and concerned at the moment.

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid filled sac which develops in an ovary. Most ovarian cysts are benign (non-cancerous) and cause no symptoms. Some cause problems such as pain and irregular bleeding. No treatment may be needed for certain types of ovarian cysts which tend to go away on their own. For other types an operation may be performed to remove the cystMany small ovarian cysts will resolve and disappear over a few months. You may be advised to have a repeat ultrasound scan in a month or so. If the cyst goes away then no further action is needed.

      The extra pain might be purely from cystitis (water infection), when I had it it was like walking on a large pelvic bruise. Get checked out, I understan your worry and concern and hope you feel better soon

  10. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have been having some pain in my ovary and stomach swelled up. I went to er and had blood work and pelvic exam and it was all good. I had to have a CT scan and it showed a cyst. I was told to follow up[ in 2 weeks with obgyn. Why didnt the doc feel the cyst on my ovary during the pelvic exam? Should I be worried that it could be cancerous or would it most likely be benign?

    • ANSWER:
      It is very important to know size of the cyst, your age and dates of your menstrual cycle.
      In general in young women with excessive concentration of estrogens some time we can discover cysts starting from the mid-cycle and after menstruation cyst can disappear. This is the reason why doctor needs to follow at least 2 week to be sure that your cyst does not depend on your hormonal cycle. The most important is to check right after menstruation (5-7 days of cycle). If it will disappear no problem, consider as temporary ovarian reaction.
      BUT if the size of the cyst is big and not changing during cycle it could be a tumor (but not cancer!) which better to treat or remove. Your doctor should be able to find the best solution for you.

      Please also check my website where you can find many useful articles and advices. Be sure you will benefit from reading them.

      If my answer was helpful to you, please select it. Thank you.
      Be Healthy and Happy!

      It is strongly recommended to consult your doctor for professional advice. Above mentioned information and recommendations are just general and should be adapted to each person according to personal health indicators and status.

  11. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts??????
    I went to the ER in August b/c I was having an early miscarriage. They did an ultrasound to confirm the miscarriage (which was a blighted ovum), and found I had a 21mm cyst on my right ovary (which made sense b/c I was having sharp shooting pains in my right side). They said it was small and functional and not to worry about it since there were no masses. Got my period in normal time and everything was back to normal (no pains). My second cycle post-miscarriage was really weird. When I ovulated it was late and I had severe bloating and cramping the evening I ovulated, then it went away, but for the 2 weeks before my period I had weird symptoms that made me think I was pregnant (breasts got huge, felt sick to my stomach, etc). And when I did get my period I felt a little throbbing on my right side for the 1st day or so. Then it went away. My 3rd post-miscarriage period started last night, and I have felt some little jabs in my right side, but they have gone away this morning. I should mention I've been to my OBGyn twice in the last 4 weeks as well as the ER (there was no pain but I was just worrying myself sick b/c I tend to obsess about this kind of stuff and I wanted to be seen asap) and had 3 pelvic exams and was told everything was completely normal and my ovaries felt totally normal and not to worry. But I can't help worrying... do you think the cyst they found on the ultrasound went away and these are all different cysts? Could I have had these all my life and never known? Some info on me that may help- I'm 29, have an 18-month-old son, weigh 130 pounds. Hubby and I will start trying for #2 in a few weeks so I just want to make sure everything is good to go!
    Thanks everyone- I really already know all the info that is out there on the internet about cysts- I really just want to hear personal stories from other women who have had them- thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).In the US ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts

      Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated.

      There are also types of other ovarian cysts you caould of been missed diagnoised with functional-more info here-
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst

      Symptoms
      Some or all of the following symptoms may be present, though it is possible not to experience any symptoms:

      Dull aching, or severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen (one or both sides), pelvis, vagina, lower back, or thighs; pain may be constant or intermittent -- this is the most common symptom
      Fullness, heaviness, pressure, swelling, or bloating in the abdomen
      Breast tenderness
      Pain during or shortly after beginning or end of menstrual period
      Irregular periods, or abnormal uterine bleeding or spotting
      Change in frequency or ease of urination (such as inability to fully empty the bladder), or difficulty with bowel movements due to pressure on adjacent pelvic anatomy
      Weight gain
      Nausea or vomiting
      Fatigue
      Infertility
      Increased level of hair growth
      Increased facial hair or body hair

      Treatment
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. [citation needed]

      Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:

      pain relievers, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain.NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain.
      a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation.
      chamomile herbal tea (Matricaria recutita) can reduce ovarian cyst pain and soothe tense muscles.
      urinating as soon as the urge presents itself.
      avoiding constipation, which does not cause ovarian cysts but may further increase pelvic discomfort.
      in diet, eliminating caffeine and alcohol, reducing sugars, increasing foods rich in vitamin A and carotenoids (e.g., carrots, tomatoes, and salad greens) and B vitamins (e.g., whole grains).
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
      Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

  12. QUESTION:
    can ovarian cysts cause infertility?
    my doctor just told me that i have ovarian cysts on both of my ovaries. i just wanted to know if they cause infertility

    • ANSWER:
      yes! they sure can. have em checked out..

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?
      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?
      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      How are ovarian cysts treated? continued...
      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

      Ovarian Cysts At A Glance
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures.
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons.
      When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one.
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound.
      The treatment of ovarian cysts varies from observation and monitoring to surgical procedures.

      hope that this info helps.

  13. QUESTION:
    can benign ovarian cysts make you infertile?
    like suppose you have to get them surgically out, can it do something to your ovaries to make you not be able to have kids?

    and also, if theyre little ones but still benign, will they go away on their own?
    thanks !

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, you won't need surgery to remove benign cysts. I've been experiencing the pain and anxiety of coping with ovarian cysts since I was 11 years old, and I am currently a 19 year old college student. There is treatment for ovarian cysts, though. I have been on Yaz, a low dose birth control pill, since I was 12, and unless I stop taking my pills for a few days, I don't have problems. The reason for this is, when you don't ovulate, you typically cannot produce a cyst, so the best option is to just go on the pill.

      You can have some scarring from your cysts, and that can affect your ovaries negatively, but that usually doesn't happen, and when it does, it's rarely severe enough to cause fertility problems.

      Your small cysts will typically go away on their own in some form or fashion. I've never had to have surgery to remove a cyst, although it did come close on a few occasions. All of my cysts have ruptured causing extreme pain, delayed periods and heavy bleeding because my cysts are usually hemorraghic. After a cyst ruptures, it just goes away, but many people never experience the kind of issues with ovarian cysts as I do. I typically have very large cysts that endanger my ovaries. My cysts cause my ovaries to twist, but I have been fortunate enough that my ovaries have not been so damaged that I have had to have a removal yet. It's extremely scary, I know, but just try to think positively about it.

      For years I worried about the fertility issue myself, but I've made peace with it now. It's unlikely that my history will affect my ability to get pregnant, and my issues were pretty severe before the pill. I have done so much research on this subject and talked to so many doctors about it, so I just want you to be assured that everything will most likely be fine.

      Best of luck!

  14. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts?
    I'm 27 and I have cysts on both of my ovaries. I'm in pain 3 weeks out of a month and my doctor tells me I need to be on birth control pills and that will stop the pain. I stop taking the pills and I'm in so much pain. It hurts to even touch my stomach and when you touch it, it burns. I can't even lay on my stomach. I need to know what should I do. My doctor is no help. He doesn't seem to understand the pain that I'm in. Is there any woman that can relate to my pain

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are small and benign, and don t produce any symptoms. Larger cysts may cause problems and it s important to speak to your GP if notice any of the following:

      Pain and discomfort low down in your abdomen. This may come and go, or be more lasting. Some women notice it more after sex;
      You may notice changes to your periods. They may become irregular, or be heavier or lighter than normal;
      Depending on where the cyst is and its size, it may put pressure on the bladder or bowels, making you need to go to the toilet more often;
      In rare cases, ovarian cysts can cause abnormal amounts of hormones to be produced. This can affect your periods, and speed up or change the way your breasts and body hair grow;
      If you have endometriosis (womb lining in other parts of the body) or polycystic ovarian syndrome (multiple cysts in the ovaries), you ll probably have other symptoms as well. Sometimes cysts cause more serious problems. If a cyst is growing on a stem from an ovary, the stem can become twisted. This stops the blood supply to the cyst and causes a lot of pain in the lower abdomen. It is called torsion and usually needs treatment in hospital. In other cases, the cyst may burst, causing sudden severe pain in the lower abdomen. The pain you feel depends on what the cyst contained, whether it is infected and whether there is any bleeding. This usually needs treatment in hospital as well.

      Very occasionally, an ovarian cyst is an early form of ovarian cancer. However, ovarian cysts are very common and about 95% are non cancerous.

  15. QUESTION:
    Ovary cyst ladies please explain?
    how do u get it? I had my left cyst removed about twos years and I am curious on how all this happen

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs that are formed in the ovaries (ovaries are two small organs on each side of the womb or the uterus that produce hormones and an egg each month) which produce hormones and an egg each month. These are common in women in their reproductive years.

      Most of these cysts are non-cancerous (benign). The various types of cysts are:
      Functional cyst
      This is the most common type. It is formed due to an aberration in the development of an egg. In a normal course a mature follicle ruptures in the ovary to release the egg and then forms a mass called the Corpus Luteum. If pregnancy does not occur in that cycle, the Corpus luteum normally disintegrates. If this does not happen then a functional cyst is formed. The functional cysts normally do not produce any symptoms and disappear within one-three menstrual cycles.

      Dermoid cyst
      These are ovarian cysts filled with cheesy material and may have various types of tissue including hair and skin in them.

      Cystadenoma
      These are cysts which develop from the outer surface of the ovary. Majority of them are benign (non- cancerous).

      Endometrial or chocolate cyst
      Sometimes clusters of cells normally found in the lining of the uterus (endometrial cells) attach themselves to the ovary causing an endometrial cyst to form. This is a dark and red-brown coloured cyst and hence is also called chocolate cyst.

      Polycystic ovary
      In this condition the ovaries have multiple small cysts. These result from hormonal imbalance. These women are usually overweight and can have excessive facial hair and difficulty in conceiving.

      Ovarian cysts usually do not cause any symptoms. However if the symptoms occur, they are:
      A feeling of fullness in the stomach or a slight pain.
      Irregular or painful periods
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      They may be detected by a pelvic examination which could be confirmed by other tests.
      Ultrasound is a test in which sound waves are used to create pictures of the organs found inside the body. It can be used to confirm the presence of the cyst and many times the nature of the cyst.

      The treatment depends upon the size and type of the cyst, the women s age and overall health, her future pregnancy plans and the symptoms that she is experiencing. The treatment options include:
      Expectant Where the cysts are small (< 8 cm) and appear functional, they can be observed for 2-3 months as many of them resolve. In the past hormones have also been given particularly with irregular periods. Currently their use is not found to be of any benefit.

      Surgery can be decided upon if the cyst does not disappear on its own or is causing severe pain or bleeding or if the cyst is of a type which requires surgery (Dermoid, Endometrial, Cystadenoma). Surgery can be through laparoscope or conventional (by an incision on the tummy), depending on the size & type of cyst patient profile and expertise of surgeon.

      Treatment of Polycystic ovaries This depends upon the requirement of the patient, her symptoms and profile. Weight reduction in an overweight patient constitutes the most important treatment. The other treatments can be hormonal for regularising the periods and for excessive facial hair as well as ovulation induction (aiding in producing an egg) in case of infertility.

      Enjoy Life

  16. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts?
    If you have had an ovarian cysts what were the symptoms you had?
    My periods have been 1 /1/2 weeks apart and my doctors says that is one thing is could be. I have had no pain so i was just wondering if anyone else has experienced this.

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are small and benign, and don t produce any symptoms. Larger cysts may cause problems and it s important to speak to your GP if notice any of the following:

      Pain and discomfort low down in your abdomen. This may come and go, or be more lasting. Some women notice it more after sex;
      You may notice changes to your periods. They may become irregular, or be heavier or lighter than normal;
      Depending on where the cyst is and its size, it may put pressure on the bladder or bowels, making you need to go to the toilet more often;
      In rare cases, ovarian cysts can cause abnormal amounts of hormones to be produced. This can affect your periods, and speed up or change the way your breasts and body hair grow;
      If you have endometriosis (womb lining in other parts of the body) or polycystic ovarian syndrome (multiple cysts in the ovaries), you ll probably have other symptoms as well. Please see separate encyclopaedia entries on these conditions for more information.
      Sometimes cysts cause more serious problems. If a cyst is growing on a stem from an ovary, the stem can become twisted. This stops the blood supply to the cyst and causes a lot of pain in the lower abdomen. It is called torsion and usually needs treatment in hospital. In other cases, the cyst may burst, causing sudden severe pain in the lower abdomen. The pain you feel depends on what the cyst contained, whether it is infected and whether there is any bleeding. This usually needs treatment in hospital as well.

      Very occasionally, an ovarian cyst is an early form of ovarian cancer. However, ovarian cysts are very common and about 95% are non cancerous. Please see the separate encyclopaedia entry on cancer of the ovary for further information.

  17. QUESTION:
    What do they do to treat Ovarian Cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac in the ovary. Many cysts are completely normal. These are called functional cysts. They occur as a result of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary). Functional cysts normally shrink over time, usually in about 1 to 3 months. If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may want to check you again in 1 to 3 months to make sure the cyst has gotten smaller. In certain cases, your doctor may want you to take birth control pills so you won't ovulate. If you don't ovulate, you won't form cysts.

      If you are menopausal and are not having periods, you shouldn't form functional cysts. If you do have a cyst, your doctor will probably want you to have a sonogram so he or she can look at the cyst. What your doctor decides to do after that depends on your age, the way the cyst looks on the sonogram and if you're having symptoms such as pain, bloating, feeling full after eating just a little, and constipation.
      Return to top

      What is a sonogram?
      A sonogram uses sound waves to make "pictures" of organs in the body. It's a good way for your doctor to "look" at your ovaries. This kind of sonogram can be done 2 ways, either through your abdomen or your vagina. Neither type is painful. The sonogram usually lasts about 30 minutes. It will give your doctor valuable information about the size and the appearance of your cyst.
      Return to top

      Are there any other tests I might have?
      Your doctor might test the level of a protein called CA-125 in your blood. Sometimes this blood test is done in women with an ovarian cyst to see if their cyst could be cancerous. A normal CA-125 level is less than 35. However, this test is not always an accurate way to tell if a woman has ovarian cancer. For example, some women who do have ovarian cancer have a normal CA-125 level. Also, this level can sometimes be high in women who do not have cancer, particularly if they are in their childbearing years. For these reasons, the CA-125 blood test is usually only recommended for women who are at high risk for ovarian cancer.
      Return to top

      Do I need surgery for an ovarian cyst?
      The answer depends on several things, such as your age, whether you are having periods, the size of the cyst, its appearance and your symptoms.

      If you're having periods and the cyst is functional, you probably won't need to have surgery. If the cyst doesn't go away after several menstrual periods, if it gets larger or if it doesn't look like a functional cyst on the sonogram, your doctor may want you to have an operation to remove it. There are many different types of ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age that do require surgery. Fortunately, cysts in women of this age are almost always benign (not cancer).

      If you're past menopause and have an ovarian cyst, your doctor will probably want you to have surgery. Ovarian cancer is rare, but women 50 to 70 years of age are at greater risk. Women who are diagnosed at an early stage do much better than women who are diagnosed later.
      Return to top

      What type of surgery would I need?
      If the cyst is small (about the size of a plum or smaller) and if it looks benign on the sonogram, your doctor may decide to do a laparoscopy. This type of surgery is done with a lighted instrument called a laparoscope that's like a slender telescope. This is put into your abdomen through a small incision (cut) just above or just below your navel (belly button). With the laparoscope, your doctor can see your organs. Often the cyst can be removed through small incisions in the pubic hair line.

      If the cyst looks too big to remove with the laparoscope or if it looks suspicious in any way, your doctor will probably do a laparotomy. A laparotomy uses a bigger incision to remove the cyst or possibly the entire ovary. While you are under general anesthesia (puts you in a sleep-like state) the cyst can be tested to find out if it is cancer. If it is cancer, your doctor may need to remove both of the ovaries, the uterus, a fold of fatty tissue called the omentum and some lymph nodes. It's very important that you talk to your doctor about all of this before the surgery. Your doctor will also talk to you about the risks of each kind of surgery, how long you are likely to be in the hospital and how long it will be before you can go back to your normal activities.

  18. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst question...?
    ok my doc believes i might have an ovarian cyst..but we havent done any tests on it yet cause she wanted to see if some medicine would help it before we did anything else....well my symptoms are

    *My left ovary hurts really bad, like a constant cramp
    *I have back pain
    *My Abdomen hurts and it sometimes feels numb..
    *My lower back hurts (around the kidneys)
    *My shoulders sometimes hurt
    *Im extremely tired all the time
    *I feel bloated
    *Im gaining alot of weight
    *For some odd reason my appeitite has increased

    What do you think is wrong? Why do you think my appeitite has increased? Do you think this is serious? On a scale of 1-10 how bad do you think?

    the doc gave me 600mg of Ibprufen...but it doesnt help with the pain!! and im going tomorrow to see her again...i just want to kinda know what is happening...thanks so much!!

    • ANSWER:
      Go to about.com and type in ovarian cysts and read up on it. Also while your there look up uterine fibroids. Most of the time cysts and or fibroids are benign (non-cancerous).

  19. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts the causes?
    what are ovarian cycts and how big are they, and how to women get them?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many different types of ovarian cysts, so I'm going to focus on the most common ones, which are usually benign (not cancerous).

      A follicular cyst happens when the ovary tries to release an egg and fails. They don't usually hurt, and they can be up about 2 inches in diameter. They usually dissolve in a few months.

      A corpus luteum cyst happens when the ovary releases an egg and the empty "egg sac" on the ovary's surface fills with fluid. These can be several inches in diameter, and they can hurt. However, they usually dissolve within a few months. Sometimes they can become large and twist (torque) or burst, causing pain and infection.

      There are other types of cysts. For instance, there are endometrial cysts, dermoid cysts, and cystadenomas (cystadenomas are the ones that can become very large, like the ones you see on the medical shows that weigh many pounds).

      These articles may be helpful:
      http://www.healthscout.com/ency/68/725/main.html#cont
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/ovarian-cysts/DS00129

      Why do women get them? I know it's not a helpful answer, but we get them because we have hormones...this may be helpful http://www.medicinenet.com/ovarian_cysts/article.htm.

  20. QUESTION:
    large, 7cm ovarian cyst?
    My mother has a history with fibroids. About 10 years ago she had half of her ovaries removed because of a benign cyst. About 2 years ago she underwent surgery to have fibroids removed since they always caused her tremendous pain. Ultrasound showed that there were still traces of them left, but nothing big and concerning. Recently, she has been getting horrible pain around her period that hurts so much it weakens her to almost warrant the ER. She did an ultrasound and the doctors found a 7cm tumor near her cervix (grown that big in a matter of 2 years?). I am so, so worried for her right now. Could anyone tell me what this could mean?

    • ANSWER:
      this might mean nothing serious...the cyst can cause tremendous pain around ovulation or time for the period to come. The "tumor" might turn out to be a misread. I had a "mass" of so many centimeters found near my cervix...when I went to the oncologist, he told me the tech (who reads ultrasounds all day long) read my ultrasound wrong. The "mass' turned out to be a Nabothian cyst, blocking part of the entrance to my cervix. this type of cyst is hardened mucous and eventually went away on its own. In the past I had painful cysts on my ovaries but did nothing about them but suffer in silence. If a woman is prone to cysts, this might just turn out to be another cyst. The ultrasound is only the first tool they use to see what's going on in there...but I would wait and see what a further exam reveals. cysts can be very very painful...cancer ( my sister had hysterectomy, endometrial cancer) can be virtually painless but cause a lot of heavy bleeding. So stay optimistic and see what it turns out to be.

  21. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts/mucinous cystadenoma ?
    About six months ago I went to the ER and they did a cat-scan on my belly and found a HUGE cyst on my left ovary. While the cyst doesn't cause me any pain it is uncomfortable and needs to be removed.
    I've been doing some research on it and from what I have read it's an unusually large type of ovarian cyst. There is a 70% chance of that the cyst is benign and just basically filled with a mucus-like fluid. My OB ran some blood tests to check for cancer and the results all came back negative so I am praying once the cyst is out and sent to the pathologist it will also come back benign. So my question is...has anybody on ever been diagnosed with this type of cyst?

    EDIT: I guess I should give a little more detail. My OB asked how my appitite was, as many women who have such large cysts aren't able to eat much. Let me tell you that is NOT the case with me...I eat like a freakin' PIG! Since I don't want to have kids (not a phase, I've known since I was a teenager I don't want kids) my doctor asked how I would feel if they had to do a hestorectomy and I said go for it. Also, because my left ovary is probably damaged, they are going to remove that and possibly my right ovary. Isn't it so weird how such a large cyst can grow inside us?
    MORE EDITS: The sh*tty thing is that they can't do laproscopic because of the size of my cyst so they have to cut me wide open. But as long as they get it out, it doesn't matter to me what they gotta do, ya know?

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same thing. Cysts on both ovaries though. They did a laproscopic surgery to remove them, and they ended up being filled with old blood and mucus. Gross I know. The tests came out negative before hand, and after. You have nothing to worry about, and you're lucky that it's not painful! You'll be fine, and it's better to take care of now than to wait. You never know what something can turn into.

  22. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst Rupture or not.?
    I have yet to have my period, i normally get it during this week or last week. I've had regular periods for about a year. 2 Winter breaks ago, i had an ovarian cyst rupture. Well yesterday morning, i woke up at 4am, from cramps. It was so bad i couldn't even move or stand with out extreme pain in my abdomen. I haven't had any pain since then beside a little back pain. Was it an ovarian cyst that ruptured or just severe cramps. My cramps have never been that bad before.

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than an orange.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature and harmless (benign).[1] In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women.[citation needed]

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.

      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove cysts larger than 5 centimeters in diameter

  23. QUESTION:
    what is the consequence of cyst in ovary?
    my sister has cyst in ovary...what is it or what does it mean?
    is it curable? n what kind of treatment should be taken 4 that...

    thanks in advance...

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Pl. find here the details .
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs that are formed in the ovaries (ovaries are two small organs on each side of the womb or the uterus that produce hormones and an egg each month) which produce hormones and an egg each month. These are common in women in their reproductive years.

      Types of ovarian cysts

      Most of these cysts are non-cancerous (benign). The various types of cysts are:
      Functional cyst
      This is the most common type. It is formed due to an aberration in the development of an egg. In a normal course a mature follicle ruptures in the ovary to release the egg and then forms a mass called the Corpus Luteum. If pregnancy does not occur in that cycle, the Corpus luteum normally disintegrates. If this does not happen then a functional cyst is formed. The functional cysts normally do not produce any symptoms and disappear within one-three menstrual cycles.

      Dermoid cyst
      These are ovarian cysts filled with cheesy material and may have various types of tissue including hair and skin in them.

      Cystadenoma
      These are cysts which develop from the outer surface of the ovary. Majority of them are benign (non- cancerous).

      Endometrial or chocolate cyst
      Sometimes clusters of cells normally found in the lining of the uterus (endometrial cells) attach themselves to the ovary causing an endometrial cyst to form. This is a dark and red-brown coloured cyst and hence is also called chocolate cyst.

      Polycystic ovary
      In this condition the ovaries have multiple small cysts. These result from hormonal imbalance. These women are usually overweight and can have excessive facial hair and difficulty in conceiving.

      The symptoms

      Ovarian cysts usually do not cause any symptoms. However if the symptoms occur, they are:
      A feeling of fullness in the stomach or a slight pain.
      Irregular or painful periods

      They may be detected by a pelvic examination which could be confirmed by other tests.

      Ultrasound is a test in which sound waves are used to create pictures of the organs found inside the body. It can be used to confirm the presence of the cyst and many times the nature of the cyst.

      The treatment

      The treatment depends upon the size and type of the cyst, the women s age and overall health, her future pregnancy plans and the symptoms that she is experiencing. The treatment options include:
      Expectant Where the cysts are small (< 8 cm) and appear functional, they can be observed for 2-3 months as many of them resolve. In the past hormones have also been given particularly with irregular periods. Currently their use is not found to be of any benefit.

      Surgery can be decided upon if the cyst does not disappear on its own or is causing severe pain or bleeding or if the cyst is of a type which requires surgery (Dermoid, Endometrial, Cystadenoma). Surgery can be through laparoscope or conventional (by an incision on the tummy), depending on the size & type of cyst patient profile and expertise of surgeon.

      Treatment of Polycystic ovaries This depends upon the requirement of the patient, her symptoms and profile. Weight reduction in an overweight patient constitutes the most important treatment. The other treatments can be hormonal for regularising the periods and for excessive facial hair as well as ovulation induction (aiding in producing an egg) in case of infertility.

  24. QUESTION:
    ovarian dermoid cyst?
    had surgery in 2009 to remove dermoid cyst on my left ovary. i am now pregnant and found out i have another dermoid on the same ovary. i will most likely get another surgery to remove the cyst, but im thinking about just removing the entire ovary so it doesnt happen again. im worried that this time it may be cancerous.

    • ANSWER:
      I had one on my right ovary back in 2005......had the whole ovary and tube removed because the cyst was the size of a cantaloupe and was what the called a complex cyst meaning it had both liquid and solid components. Althougth it was huge it wasn't cancerous but it did contain 2 prefectly formed teeth,sweat glands ,thyroid glands,LOTS of fatty material,LOTS of hair and bits of calcium.....nasty to say the least. My advice is don't be overly concerned, they are almost always benign. Best of luck with your pregnancy! Also I almost forgot to mention, they thought I very likely had it all my life which means through BOTH of my pregnancies and it was never detected for some reason. I always felt like I was "full" and had periods of severe discomfort from it but until I found my present Dr. no one ever took it seriously......Thank God it all turned out okay!

  25. QUESTION:
    nabothian cyst!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?
    uterus is unenlarged,anteverted with normal myometrial echopattern.its measures about 4.1x 4.0x3.ocm.the endometrial is thickend ans echogenic measuring 11.9cm.Nabothian cysts are seen

    right vary-notvisulaized
    left ovary-2.0x1.6cm
    the left is within normal size with few follicles seen.a cyst is seen in the right adnexa measuring 2.9x2.3cm
    no ascites notes

    can someone tell me what is this all about plsssssssssssssssss
    tnxx

    • ANSWER:
      Right ovary is not visualized so i can't say any thing about it..
      but the left ovary looks normal.
      cyst size is small and if it is asymptomatic leave it as such.
      95 percent of ovarian cyst are benign that is harmless . but if there is pain and uncomfort consult doctor
      read my article on ovarian cysts.
      http://adilclinic.blogspot.com/2010/11/treatments-of-ovarian-cysts.html
      your cyst is smaller and there are high chance that it will dissapear spontaneously.
      moreover Nabothian cysts are the bumps present on the cervix. these are harmless. and dissappear spontaneously.( by themselves) but some may persistant. if you feel any pain or discomfort than see a doctor.

  26. QUESTION:
    What is an ovarian cyst?
    Please explain to me because I possibly have one of those and I don't really know what they are very well..

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than an orange.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature and harmless (benign).[1] In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women.

  27. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst?
    I was told I have an ovarian cyst and I was wonderind what was some of the symptoms cause I'm always really weak feeling no energy and I was wondering could the cyst be causeing it?

    • ANSWER:
      The Cyst-Clopedia: Everything You Always Wanted to Know
      by Robert B. Albee, MD

      Women are often told, "Don t worry about it, it s just a cyst," but they are also told, "I m concerned, you ve got a cyst." How do you know what s what? Dr. Albee provides an encyclopedia of information about many types of cysts.
      Introduction
      A cyst is a spherical area in any organ in which an outer wall encloses a type of tissue of a different consistency than the normal tissue. In most cases, the cyst wall encloses a softer or more liquid tissue. If the growth is solid it is called a tumor or neoplasm.

      Ovarian Cysts
      Within the ovary itself there are well over a dozen different types of cysts. There are many descriptive terms used to categorize these cysts. Some of these include:

      Functional Cysts
      Functional cysts are the result of normal processes within the ovary and are self-limiting. Each ovulation a woman has is accompanied by a follicle cyst and then a corpus luteum cyst. At the end of each cycle they are expected to completely resolve.

      Simple Cysts
      These cysts may be functional or not. When seen on ultrasound, they have a single cavity without the echoes that indicate compartments within the cyst.

      Complex Cysts
      These cysts have more than one compartment within them and are less likely to be functional.

      Hemorrhagic Cysts
      This term refers to any cyst felt to have blood or clots within it. This term can be linked with another, such as when some bleeding occurs within a corpus luteum cyst, and the result is called a hemorrhagic corpus luteum.

      Fixed Cysts
      These cysts are not freely moveable. This immobility suggests that they are involved with adhesions or have attached themselves to adjacent structures.

      Dermoid Cysts
      These cysts are a type of nonfunctional, benign cyst. Their actual name is "benign cystic teratoma." These cysts may have hair, teeth, and fat in them. They are formed in embryo and should be removed but are rarely harmful. They can almost always be removed while preserving some portion of healthy ovary.

      Endometriomas
      These cysts are caused by endometriosis in the ovary or other tissues. The cyst wall has endometrial glands in it. As these cysts progress they frequently produce a thick dark material the consistency of fudge syrup trapped inside. Thus they have been given the name "chocolate cyst."

      Treating Functional Cysts
      If a functional cyst is found but isn t causing symptoms, it is usually just observed. Sometimes pain or long duration forces us to try to hasten its resolution. Anything that prevents ovulation or turns off estrogen and progesterone production should help. Oral contraceptives are the most common treatment.

      What if it Ruptures?
      Ruptures may result in various experiences. They may go unnoticed or they may be associated with sudden, often intense, pain. Because the cyst contents are normal body fluids (like follicle fluid), this spillage is not harmful. The body naturally absorbs and removes these fluids. Even blood is generally removed without a problem, although usually more slowly than other fluids.

      When Should I Worry?
      Any cyst that does not behave like a functional cyst should be evaluated further so that serious problems like cancer can be ruled out. Criteria possibly indicating the need for further evaluation include family history, symptomatology, size, duration, complexity, and mobility.

      These criteria are evaluated in the following ways:

      Patient-physician communication provides important history regarding the family and the patient's symptoms.
      Pelvic examination provides the initial estimates of size, tenderness, and mobility.
      Ultrasound and/or CT scans (occasionally MRI) provide some details regarding size, complexity, and mobility.
      Repeat exam after intervals of time provide information regarding duration.

      Then What?
      Once the physician determines that a cyst is probably not functional, exact information must be obtained. Although sometimes a needle guided aspiration will provide the needed information, it does not allow for treatment at the same time. In most cases diagnostic laparoscopy is recommended. This allows for visual inspection, tissue biopsy (frozen section) if needed and, in most cases, definitive treatment all at the same time.

      How Are Ovarian Cysts Treated?
      There are several approaches to treating an ovarian cyst:

      Aspiration - A cyst may be treated by simply draining the fluid out. This technique does not remove the cyst wall and frequently allows the cyst to reform over a period of time.

      Aspiration plus cyst wall ablation - This form of treatment adds the use of some form of energy such as electrical current (cauterization, fulguration), or laser to destroy the cyst wall after the aspiration is done. Its limitation is the inability to determine when the entire wall has been completely destroyed. In my opinion, when a vigorous attempt is made to destroy the wall of a cyst using this technique, it tends to cause additional tissue destruction to the normal areas of ovary surrounding the cyst.

      Excision - This form of treatment involves totally removing the entire cyst wall by cutting it out of the ovary. This can be accomplished by using cautery, sharp scissors dissection, or laser cutting (not to be confused with laser ablation). In rare cases after excision, suturing of the ovary is required to restore its normal shape, but this is not common. Excision is my preference for treating endometriosis of the ovary. It has by far the lowest risk of recurrence.

      Oophorectomy - Removal of the ovary is rarely required to remove a benign cyst. It is still the recommended form of treatment for all malignant cysts.

      Is Biopsy a Treatment?

      No!

      Ovaries and Adhesions

      Adhesions are the method the body uses to isolate injury, infection, and certain types of irritants to the peritoneal surfaces, such as blood or cancer cells.

      The ovary may be the source of the problem, or it may be an innocent bystander. Pelvic infection may come from the tubes and involve the ovaries, or be secondary to a different type of pelvic surgery, such as for a tubal pregnancy. The ovary itself can spill contents that create adhesions, such as blood, fat (from a dermoid), or chocolate from an endometrioma.

      If an ovary is stuck to another organ, we can often tell the source of the problem, especially with active endometriosis. Certain patterns and types of adhesions also suggest certain causes. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is almost always bilateral and generalized, as opposed to unilateral and focal. Sometimes we can match a patient's known history of infection or previous surgeries with her adhesions. This can help eliminate some possible causes for the scarring.

      For more information about scarring, please see the CEC newsletter about Adhesions.

      Cancers are almost always immediately visible and obvious.

      Although this article has only touched on some aspects of cysts, I hope we've helped you sort through some of the possibilities you may face.

      Source(s):

      Dr. Robert Albee, Center for Endometriosis Care, www.centerforendo.com

  28. QUESTION:
    How dangerous are ovarian cysts?
    i was wondering how dangerous it would be if someone had ovarian cysts and they went untreated. Could it be harmful and what would happen?
    i've had one before and it burst and i had to go to the hospital. They tell me its likely that i'll get more.

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is simply a collection of fluid within the normally solid ovary. There are many different types of ovarian cysts, and they are an extremely common gynecologic problem. Because of the fear of ovarian cancer, cysts are a common cause of concern among women. But, it is important to know that the vast majority of ovarian cysts are not cancer.

      The good news is that almost all ovarian cysts will go away by themselves without any treatment. Since the vast majority of ovarian cysts are benign, the presence of an ovarian cyst is a usually a non-worrisome occurrence.

      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/ovarian-cysts.htm

  29. QUESTION:
    question about ovarian cyst?
    I went and had an ultrasound today and they said I have a 5.5mm benign(sp) cyst on my left ovary. They said I haven't had regular periods because the cyst never releases the egg causing it to get bigger and bigger. they gave me some birthcontrol to take for three months and if the cyst doesn't get smaller then they have to do surgery...what are some reasons the cyst wouldn't ge smaller when I'm on the birth control?

    • ANSWER:
      I had this same problem. The doctor explained that every month your ovaries produce small cysts. Most of them get absorbed back in but once in a while you get one that doesn't. Then, when your ovaries produce cysts again the next month the new cyst gets added to the old one that's still there, making a bigger cyst. The birth control is designed to stop new cysts from forming every month, so the old cyst shouldn't get any bigger, but it hasn't been proven yet to have any effect on a cyst that's already there. It worked for me though!

  30. QUESTION:
    Tortion Ovarian 10cm cyst, can it be cancer or malignant?
    2 weeks ago my wife had a 10cm tortion cyst removed together with one of her ovaries. The surgeon told us "nothing to worry about". The cyst was sent for histology and the days and night waiting for the result are endless...does the surgeon has imminent indication if its a "bad" cyst or a "good" one? Would you be concerned or would you have your mind at ease

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are benign. They are fluid filled sacs on or within the ovary. The rather large size of your wife's cyst caused her ovary to twist (ovary torsion) which is why is was removed. Sometimes the doctor can remove the cyst, and untwist the ovary, but if the ovary is damaged, it is removed. I would not try to worry about it too much, there is probably nothing to worry regarding whether or not the cyst is benign. Unfortunately, ovarian cysts are all too common, I have had them on both of my ovaries.

  31. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts and pregnancy?
    My 25 year old daughter has a history of ovarian cysts and had one rupture the other day. What are the risks? She is 6 weeks into her pregnancy.
    Thank you in advance for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cyst during Pregnancy
      By:
      Kelly Shanahan

      Question :
      I am 35 and 13 weeks into my second pregnancy. Four weeks ago, I went to the hospital for pain in my lower right quadrant. A sonogram showed a cyst on my right ovary, about 15cm. The doctor has had me in bed since then, and I have had two more sonograms. It hasn't gone down. The doctors seem to think it is fluid-filled and not cancerous. Can cysts really go down on their own? How long should I wait to see if it will go down? Have you heard of any cysts this large during pregnancy, and do they pose a danger to the baby?

      Alberta

      Answer :
      Cysts (fluid-filled structures) can go down on their own, but it is unlikely a 15cm cyst in pregnancy will do so. Cysts are not that uncommon during pregnancy, affecting about 1 in 1,000 pregnant women. The vast majority of ovarian masses found during pregnancy are benign; the incidence of ovarian cancer is 1 in 25,000 births. Ultrasound can be helpful in determining if a mass is benign or malignant, but it cannot do so with 100 percent certainty. If ultrasound shows that the mass is strictly fluid-filled, without septation or thick walls, it is probably benign.
      The problem with large, even benign, cysts during pregnancy is that they may rupture or torse (twist on themselves). Either of these events leads to significant pain for mom and the potential for miscarriage or preterm labor and delivery for the baby. Large (more than 6-8cm) cysts are usually removed surgically if they do not decrease in size spontaneously over the course of a few weeks. In pregnancy, the best time to operate is in the second trimester, ideally around 14-16 weeks. Occasionally, a cyst may be dealt with via laparoscopy, but very large cysts often require a large, open incision.

      A 15 cm cyst is rather big, and the potential for complications like rupture is high. If it has remained for more than two weeks, I suggest you talk to your doctor about your option. Your doctor may have been just watching you for now, until you get out of the first trimester (the first 13 weeks of pregnancy). I have removed several masses this size during pregnancy, and all of my patients went on to deliver normal, healthy babies.

      http://yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/ovarian-cyst-during-pregnancy.html
      and more info
      http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/ovariancysts.htm
      http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/ovariancysts/a/ovariancysts.htm
      http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1699.htm

  32. QUESTION:
    Abnormal Complex Ovarian Cyst?
    Doc says my mom (43) has an Abnormal Complex Ovarian Cyst.

    What is this, where can I find more info, what will happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Abnormal ovarian cysts are very different from functional cysts since they have resulted from abnormal cell growth. However, that need not mean that they are all cancerous as most of them are simple benign growths. And none knows for sure what has caused them to grow. However, abnormal ovarian cysts that include cystadenoma cyst, dermoid cyst, endometrioma cyst or Chocolate cyst and 'polycystic ovarian cyst' are believed to occur due to imbalance of 'female hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and a multitude of other direct and indirect reasons. In many women, these cysts have remained all through their lives without the host being aware of their presence. But in some rare cases, they may burst, needing immediate surgical interference.

      Cystadenoma cysts

      These abnormal ovarian cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovaries and can grow to a very large size. Mucinous Cystadenoma cysts take the form of biggest tumours in women often weighing approximately 328 lb or around 149 kg, These cysts reportedly occur at an early age and the cyst turned tumour happens to be unilateral and are often found attached to the ovary by a stem. As there is a rare chance of these cysts or tumours turning malignant, they may be classified historically and treated accordingly. Falling under the category of asymptomatic cysts, they may be found in the form of large abdominal mass during a routine check up of a person complaining abdominal pain and associated distressing condition.

      Dermoid cyst or teratomas

      As a fairly bizarre phenomenon, Dermoid cysts, clinically termed as 'cystic teratoma' are classed more as tumours than cysts. In fact, they are solid structures filled with pieces of bone, hair, teeth and skin, as well as hair follicles, pockets of blood, sebum and in some cases 'thyroid tissue'. Though they are normally benign, the rarely occurring malignant dermoid cyst usually develops as 'squamous cell carcinoma' in adults. Incidentally, a Pilonidal cyst often resembles dermoid cyst in several ways, the most significant resemblance concern the presence of Germ Cell Tumour. In case of any evasive surgery care must be taken so that there is no spillage while the opinion of an oncologist will be helpful.

      Periorbital Dermoid Cysts

      Even the kids are not spared of Dermoid cysts - often kids get them close to the eyebrow's lateral aspect and they feel like rubber. When the cysts are seen, medical practitioners sometimes keep them under observation and at other times they are surgically removed. However when they are meddled with, the cysts may lead to an inflammation. And even after treatment, the cyst may make a comeback, particularly if the entire growth has not been removed. But the problem is, the complete cyst can often be difficult to remove with surgery, particularly when it is a 'Dumbbell Configuration', in which, it needs to be cut along the suture line of the skull.

      Endometrial cysts or Chocolate cysts

      Endometriosis is a medical terminology that indicates a condition when the endometrium or the lining of the womb begins to grow in parts of the body other than the womb. These endometrial patches also forms on the ovaries, creating cysts popularly known as Chocolate cysts as they are invariably filled with chocolate coloured pre-stored blood. During the menstrual period every month, these endometrial patches of tissues that have been encapsulated in cyst will also bleed, but since there is no outlet for bleeding, the cyst go on getting larger in size and eventually may burst.

      Polycystic ovarian cyst

      Cysts forming from small egg follicles causing ovaries to get thickened and enlarged, often accompanied by hormonal imbalance in women are known as polycystic ovarian cyst that grow in numbers.

      Holistic approach as plausible cure

      Since OTC medications and prescription drugs can hardly solve the problem of abnormal ovarian cysts in your body and surgical removal of the cyst involves many factors that may not prove beneficial, a holistic approach towards a plausible cure seems to be the best answer. You need also to remember that the surgical removal of a cyst is not foolproof since a recurrence can never be ruled out.

      The holistic approach to the cure is more practical too as the cyst formation involves a multitude of factors starting from hormonal imbalance to psychological trauma. Besides, the holistic approach will add newer dimension towards the treatment that includes change of food habits, change of lifestyle and appropriate physical exercise, topics hitherto unheard of as right line of treatment for abnormal ovarian cysts.

  33. QUESTION:
    Are ovrian cysts dangerous?
    I am sixteen and I have an ovrian cyst on my right side and nobody believes me when I tell them it hurts and my mom won't take me back to the doctor what should I do I'm so scared
    please more answers

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is a sac of tissue that develops inside an ovary. It is very common, usually painless and will often go away without treatment.

      Ovarian cysts can affect women of any age.

      Most ovarian cysts are small, although some may reach a large size. There are two main types:

      Functional ovarian cysts (the most common type). These are harmless cysts that are short-lived and formed as part of the menstrual cycle.
      Pathological cysts. These are growths in the ovaries that are either benign (harmless) or malignant (cancerous).

      Most ovarian cysts are small, benign and do not produce any symptoms.

      Larger cysts may cause problems, such as pain and swelling in your abdomen (see Symptoms, above, for more information).

      Most ovarian cysts disappear after a few weeks without treatment.

      If the cyst is large or is causing symptoms, it will probably be removed.
      http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ovarian-cyst/Pages/Introduction.aspx

  34. QUESTION:
    what is an ovary cyst?
    im 13 and the doc said i have ovary cyst and i just want to know wht that is and can i still have kids

    • ANSWER:
      AN ovarian cyst is a fluid fill sac within your ovary. There are various different types of cyst.

      On the whole, the vast majority are benign (=harmless) and this is especially so at your age. So there is NO reason to suspect that your fertility (= ability to have children) is reduced.

      There is a syndrome called PCOS (=poly cystic ovarian syndrome) which is related to reduced fertility (= less chance of having children) but based on what you say, you do NOT have pcos (based on the fact that you mentioned one cyst, where as PCOS presents with many, tiny cysts).

  35. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst findings...?
    Size of right ovary: 2.4 x 2.3 x 1.4 cm
    Left ovary: 6.4 x 6.1 x 3.0 cm
    Two large anechoic cystic structures.
    Size of cysts:
    Cyst 1: 5.9 x 5.0 x 3.3 cm 50.9 cc
    Cyst 2: 2.5 x 2.3 x 2.2 cm 6.6 cc

    There is no evidence of uterine abnormality. The right ovary is normal in appearance. There is a septated cyst of the left ovary which is mostly unchanged from its appearance on Jan 26. There are no nodules or papillary projections. This is probably a benign ovarian neoplasms
    such as a cystadenoma. Follow up is advisable. There is no ascites.

    I know this means it is non cancerous, but what else does this means? Are my cysts considered large? What can you tell me from this report?

    • ANSWER:
      Doesn't your doctor determine if the cysts are large? That first cyst sounds like it should be removed surgically if it doesn't shrink soon.

  36. QUESTION:
    cysts on ovary............?
    okay so for a while now ive had lower back pain,pelvic cramps,pain during and after sex one time it hurt so bad a couldn't walk,period has changed allot,ive been just feeling like im pregnant but im not,ive been out of breath real easy too,high body temperature,and abnormal bleeding.
    dose it sound like i have one?
    or what else could be wrong?
    thanks =]

    • ANSWER:
      It's possible that it could be one or a few benign ovarian cysts, which happen to many women, myself included. Definitely sounds like what I've felt. Or, it could be something like pelvic inflammatory disease (very common, treatable result of infection). http://www.cdc.gov/std/PID/STDFact-PID.htm

      The fact that you've been feeling lethargic and had abnormal bleeding could also just indicate a hormonal imbalance, or even endometriosis http://www.medicinenet.com/endometriosis/article.htm which can be painful but is also treatable.

      The only way to really be certain about what's giving you pain and other symptoms like those is to visit your doctor or preferably a gynecologist. Blood tests, a pelvic exam and a pelvic ultrasound will help your doctor(s) determine exactly what's bothering you.

      Take care!

  37. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst symptoms?
    Hi everyone. So i was diagnosed with an ovarian cyst in my left ovary in November of 2010. It is still there, & I have checkups with an ultra sound check every 4-5 months now. It's a benign cyst, but it's very consistent. I was put on Levora (birth control pill) so the hormones could shrink the cyst until it went away on it's own... But it obviously isn't going away on it's own.
    So my questions are:
    Has anyone experienced ONE cyst lasting for over a year? & what did you do with it?
    Also, my stomach is super bloated this past week, is that affiliated with the cyst at all?
    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm on birth control as well to get rid of my cyst.
      I don't get any of those stabbing pains anymore, I doubt that the bloating is affiliated with the cyst.
      Occasionally I get minimal symptoms from my period, although I'm on the pill.
      It might just be that, though I'd definitely make sure you tell your physician.

  38. QUESTION:
    What would cause an ovarian cyst in a 13 year old?
    When i was 13 (im 15 now) i got an ovarian cyst on my left ovary. It was pretty big and it got twisted around 3 times. I never had any symptoms except for one morning i got up before school and i just had a really sharp pain. I had surgery the next morning to remove it. I read up about it because i wasnt really sure what it was and i read that it usually occurs in woman during their child bearing years. What would be the cause of me getting it?

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than a cantaloupe.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign). In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.

      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts."

  39. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst with General Anesthesia?
    this is my first time in my life being put under....I have a 9centimeter cyst near my ovary and they want to go in with a camera through my belly button 1st then do 2 incisions on each side of my belly and try to suck it out and if it looks like cancer a full hysterectomy in place but 90% of cysts come back benign......Im scared of anesthesia and googleing it from online sounds a little scary people say its like a coma type sleep but some say it's not like that even an anesthesiologist said its not like that that is is indeed very safe can people please share there experiences with me to maybe ease my mind a little bit im 29yrs old and so scared of not waking up my surgery is June 6th 2013 a week from today i am so scared please help someone

    • ANSWER:
      I have had surgery several times, once for an ovarian cyst removal when I was 20, and being put under is very pleasant. It happens almost immediately and when you wake up it's equally pleasant, and not scary in the least. Cysts are almost always benign, so try not to worry too much. Best wishes!!

  40. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst ? ?
    ok so i am a lil bit scared to go to a doctor and he tells me that i have an ovarian cyst.
    well i know my mom and my grandma had it and they keep saying it runs in the family, so now im having all these stupid symptoms like irregular periods , pelvic pain that sometimes hurts so much i cant move and other times i just keep on walking and some other stuff... well my question is..had anyone else had an ovarian cyst , how does it feel like ? should i be concerned or its prob. nothing big..., helllpp me ..im scared. Just tell me ur story

    • ANSWER:
      Ive had a few ovarian cysts; they were painless and picked up because of my really irregular period and suspicion of pcos. I was put on the pill and told that that would help 'preserve' my fertility as cysts can scar the ovaries but it wasn't something to worry much about. My sister on the other hand had really painful cysts and the doctor gave her something for it; I'm afraid I dont know what - an antibiotic maybe? I never got details but I know it wasn't serious besides the pain and shes fine now and on the pill too.

      I say get it checked out but don't stress over it till you get the results , chances are good its benign or nothing and you just get a prescription for the pill.

  41. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts?
    Hello,
    Need some advice about 6mos they found a cysts in my left ovary about 6cm, so the doc told me to wait and get a follow up, well it grew alittle more, and he told me he wants to see me right away. Anybody ever have one and how was it treated. I am scared, the report said something about no fluid in the cul de sac whatever that means?
    I went back to doc today, my period is due in 2 days so he said he wants me to go have another ultrasound right after my period, to see if the cysts goes away after that, if not then he will put me under and drain it.

    • ANSWER:
      I had a solid complex ovarian cyst recently at 41 yrs. old. They found it on a cat scan because I was having terrible back pain. They did an ultrasound and then watched and waited. I worried myself sick and after a few months it went away on its own. I also had one a few years ago that was the size of a grapefruit that was benign and I had a hysterctomy then. If they decide to remove it they will do it laproscopic and make small incisions or if it is too big for that procedure they will make a bikini line incision would be my guess. I've had both done and I got through them just fine. I can understand being scared but i've been there and the odds of it being malignant are small. If it looked suspicious they would not have waited 6 months to look at it again. Hope that helps.

  42. QUESTION:
    Possible ovarian cyst rupture and early period?
    I'm a 15 year old girl and I've had my period since i was like 11. This morning I woke up in the middle of the night with sharp excruciating pain/cramping in my pelvic area. I felt pressure on my bowels so I tried to go to the bathroom but couldn't. The pain slightly went away and I went back to sleep and woke up with my period which is a little over a week early. Was this an ovarian cyst rupture and if it was, should I see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid filled sac which develops in an ovary. Most ovarian cysts are benign (non-cancerous) and cause no symptoms. Some cause problems such as pain and irregular bleeding. No treatment may be needed for certain types of ovarian cysts which tend to go away on their own. For other types an operation may be performed to remove the cyst.-->Read more...

  43. QUESTION:
    what are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      Introduction
      Symptoms Causes
      Diagnosis
      Treatment
      Symptoms of ovarian cysts
      Most ovarian cysts are small, benign (harmless) and do not produce any symptoms.

      Symptoms of large cysts
      Large cysts may cause problems, so it is important to speak to your GP if you notice any of the following:

      Pain and discomfort in your abdomen. This may come and go, but it may last for long periods of time. Some women notice it more after sex.
      Bloating or swelling in your abdomen.
      Changes to your periods. They may become irregular, painful, heavier or lighter than normal.
      Needing to go to the toilet more often. Depending on where the cyst is and its size, it may put pressure on the bladder or bowels. It may also cause pain during bowel movements.
      Changes in the way your breasts and body hair grow. In rare cases, ovarian cysts can cause abnormal amounts of hormones to be produced, which can speed up or change the way your breasts and body hair grow.
      Some medical conditions may cause additional symptoms:

      If you have endometriosis (where cells that line the womb are found in other parts of the body), you may also have pelvic pain and low backache.
      If you have polycystic ovarian syndrome (multiple cysts in the ovaries) you may also experience weight gain and acne.
      For more information, see Useful links.

      Symptoms of complicated cysts
      Sometimes, ovarian cysts cause more serious problems, which are outlined below. These types of cyst will need hospital treatment (see Treatment, above).

      Torsion

      If a cyst is growing on a stem from an ovary, the stem can become twisted (called torsion). This stops the blood supply to the cyst and causes a lot of pain in the lower abdomen.

      Bursting

      The cyst may burst, causing sudden severe pain in the lower abdomen. The pain you feel depends on what the cyst contained, whether it is infected and whether there is any bleeding.

      Cancer

      Very occasionally, an ovarian cyst is an early form of ovarian cancer. However, ovarian cysts are very common and about 95% are non-cancerous.

  44. QUESTION:
    Could I have Ovarian Cancer or Cysts?
    Hi, I have been having pelvic pain for a month now on both sides in my ovaries and it does not get any better. My lower back is achy and I am often constipated. I am beginning to wonder if I have a cyst or cancer. The symptoms seem to be very similar if not exact with they are for ovarian cancer, and less similar to that of cysts. Also, I started my period two days ago and it isn't a normal period, it is very light and brown and it hurt to even have a tampon in. What do you think could be wrong? Is pregnancy even an option? The last time I had sex was on my period so I know that makes the chances of pregnancy little to none.

    • ANSWER:
      A untreated and chronic cyst may transform into a benign tumor and thence to malignancy.

      Instant Diagnosis*of any Disease and or the affected organ[s]---even Cancer, HIV/AIDS or any Incurable Disease/Syndrome with the aid of acupressure maps.
      U may study the details, discuss with Ur family members and friends and understand the concept of Acupressure and confirm for Urself, if U or anybody else has cancer/hiv and the affected organs.

      Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi s Sarcoma, etc., Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      Remote control acupressure points to diagnose Cancer, hiv/AIDS, or any disease- Point Nos.1-10 -----1 [brain], 2 [Mental Nerves], 3 [Pituitarygland], 4 [Pineal gland], 5 [Head Nerves], 6 [Throat], 7 [Neck], 8 [Thyroid & Parathyroid], 9 [Spine], 10 [piles-constipation], , Point Nos.11-16, No.11 [Prostrate gland], 12 [Penis], 13 [Vagina], 14. Testes & Ovaries], 15 [Uterus], 16 [Lymph], 37 [spleen].

      Diagnosis--With the help of maps published herein, hard press these points with Ur thumb and middle finger and find out if all/most of acu points are tender. If all these or most of these points are very painful on thumb pressure, it means one has cancer/hiv/dreaded disease[s].
      Suppose, point no. 11 [prostate] along with no.8 [thyroid, 16 [lymph], then it is prostate cancer.
      If point no. 27 [stomach] along with point no.8, 16, then stomach cancer/ulcer, etc.,
      Point Nos.16, 8, 14, 15, 37 then it is ovarian cancer.
      Point Nos.16, 8, 15,37 uterine cancer.
      Note In every cancer, 8 [thyroid], 16 [lymph] are tender as a precondition.
      Prevention & Cure: Remote control Acupressure points given by the God. For Treatment and perceivable relief , hard-pressure is to be applied on & around these points with Ur thumb and middle finger.
      Palms/soles:
      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2304961665160.2103840.1282822997&type=1&l=0a6bb63dd0

      Dorsal side of Palms & soles:
      In the middle of dorsal side of Ur palm, the remote control point for the breast is given. On hard pressing by Ur thumb and middle finger, if it hurts, U may feel that U/she have/has breast cancer. If U press the surrounding area on both palms regularly three times a day and then breast cancer shall not grow further. Acupressure & Indian Natural Remedies can cure breast cancer safely & totally.

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2306802071169.2103895.1282822997&type=1&l=38eadce9df
      Cure is available by Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies.

      PS:If satisfied/benefited with, U may inform others to browse Yahoo Answers on any health issue.

      Source: HEALTH IN UR HANDS [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.
      Dr.Vora, the world renowned Acupressurist, an octogenarian and the Bhishma Pithamaha of acupressure in India--- cured and caused to cure more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases---Dr.Devendra Vora has analyzed that pressure applied on certain points located on the palms and soles helps to stimulate all organs of the body, prevents disease and assists in maintaining good health. Acupressure also helps to diagnose, prevent and cure diseases like common cold, Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, Migraine, Paralysis, and even cancer, HIV/AIDS. Autism, Thalassemia, Muscular Dystrophy, all brain and spinal cord affected diseases.

  45. QUESTION:
    Left Complex Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a "very large" neoplastic cyst on my left ovary accompanied by several smaller ones, and small follicals.I have surgery planned for next wednesday. At that surgery we will find out if it is cancerous or benign. I am not interested in finding out what my chances are if it is cancerous or not. I will take it when it comes. If it is benign, I'm interested if the removal of these cysts will take away my symptoms.My symptoms include: weight gain of at least 15 or 20 pounds in 4 months.I went from a 38 DD to a 38 G in 4 months I have cystic acne and bumps on my face, neck, chest and shoulders. My stomach, feet, fingers and face swell.
    Will some of this stuff go away? Its miserable.
    P.s. I'm 27

    • ANSWER:
      The long-term outlook depends on whether the cysts are a one-time development or a symptom of some other problem. The symptoms are likely to diminish but not necessarily disappear is there is a disorder causing the ovarian cysts to develop. A possible cause of the cysts is polycystic ovarian syndrome, which is caused by a hormonal imbalance. Cystic acne and ovarian cysts are two symptoms of PCOS. With PCOS, the hormonal imbalance needs to be corrected to keep the cysts and other symptoms from returning.

  46. QUESTION:
    What does it mean for a cyst to be found on ovary, how is it treated?
    A few weeks ago a large cyst was found on an ultrasound when I went for a check-up. I only found out by getting a copy of my medical records. The doctor and nurses didn't tell me anything about it. Does it go away on its own if I ignore it or what? I've been having a lot of cramping and bloating.

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian about 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended

  47. QUESTION:
    what causes ovarian cysts?
    Ppl I know have gotten them and I dont want one and I wanna know how it can be prevented help please.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts often develop for no apparent reason in women who have monthly periods.
      There are a number of different types of ovarian cyst, which are categorised as either:
      functional cysts these are harmless cysts that form as part of the menstrual cycle, and are the most common type
      pathological cysts tumours in the ovaries that can either be benign (harmless) or malignant (cancerous)
      Functional cysts

      There are two types of functional ovarian cyst:
      follicular cysts
      luteal cysts
      These are described below.
      Follicular cysts

      Follicular cysts are the most common type of ovarian cysts.
      Each month, a woman's ovaries release an egg which travels down the fallopian tubes into the womb (uterus), where it can be fertilised by a man's sperm.
      Each egg forms inside the ovary in a tiny structure known as a follicle. The follicle contains fluid that protects the egg as it grows and it bursts when the egg is released.
      However, sometimes a follicle does not release an egg, or it does not shed its fluid and shrink after the egg is released. If this happens, the follicle can get bigger as it swells with fluid. The fluid-filled follicle becomes a follicular ovarian cyst.
      In most cases, only one follicular cyst develops at a time. It will often disappear without treatment after a few weeks.

  48. QUESTION:
    i have a large cyst on my ovary, what dose this mean ?
    am 22 years old and have a son who is 18 months old, i usually have regular periods but am 2 weeks late, i have been getting a pain that comes and goes on the left side of my pelvic area so i went to my GP and he re feared me to go and get a ultrasound and that was done today during this the woman carrying out the ultra sound said that i have a large cyst on my left ovary and and that my womb lining is thick and told me too make a appointment with my GP,

    am very confused and dont know what this means is the any thing i should be worried about
    i dont think am preganant as it did not show up on the scan today
    ANY IDEAS ON WHAT TREATMEANT IS OFFED

    • ANSWER:
      Well, a cysts is a fluid-filled sac, there are various types. They are pretty common, so in that sense you don't need to worry. And the vast majority of ovarian cysts are benign (which means harmless). So that's good news too. But still, they do need serious follow up. If they get too big there is a risk of rupture which can cause more problems. You don't say how large your cyst is,

      The thick womb lining may just be related to the time of the month (it is at its thickest mid month until your period). But it could be that your cyst has caused elevated progesterone levels, which
      has resulted in a thicker than normal lining (progesterone is the hormone which prepares the lining of your womb to accept an egg). Again I don't know how thick your lining is, so cannot make a judgment.

      Most likely your doctor will just want to monitor you carefully for a while.

      So to summarise, the vast majority of these cases are not serious, but equally, it could be risky to just ignore it (as very occasionally it can become more serious). So my advice is to talk to your doctor and follow his recommendations. But don't get too stressed in the meantime, because only rarely does this diagnosis lead to more serious problems.

  49. QUESTION:
    Can you get cancer from a cyst in one of your ovaries?
    I was have severe pain a couple of nights ago, so I went to the emergency room and they did a pelvic exam and gave me a catscan. The doctor told me that my right ovary is bigger than the other one and she said that I probably have a cyst. Could a cyst turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      NO, a benign cyst does not "turn" into cancer. It's is either benign or a cancerous ovarian tumor. Cysts are very common. Some will rupture on their own, others require surgery. Get away from the ER doc and get a GYN to evaluate you.

  50. QUESTION:
    What's an ovarian cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      "An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than an orange.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature and harmless (benign).[1] In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women.[citation needed]

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.

      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove cysts larger than 5 centimeters in diameter."
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst


benign cyst on ovaries ovarian cysts