Tag Archives: Brain Stroke

Cysts On Ovaries What Causes A Stroke

The information about hemorrhagic stroke should be focused on the symptoms of stroke, causes, risk factors, diagnosis, complications and treatments. This condition is just a form of Brain Stroke that results to drastic outcomes. Brain has several protective layers; the Dura matter and most especially the skull that encloses this organ. At birth, the skull of a person overrides with each other and as the person grows older the skull completely closes which disables the ability of the brain cavity to append its normal volume and pressure.

Hemorrhagic Stroke occurs when there is a seeping of blood from the tissues or blood vessels. Blood that seeps out from its origin causes irritation of the brain tissue and swelling can occur. The blood coming from these sources accumulate and form a hematoma. Since the normal structure of the brain cavity doesn t include hematoma, the intracranial pressure will then increase. This is due to the pressure that the hematoma causes on the brain tissue that can further result to serious damages on it.

There are various types of Hemorrhagic stroke according to the site where the bleeding occurs. The bleeding can happen in the brain matter, termed as intracerebral haemorrhage. Intracranial aneurysms are the bulging of weak walls of the arteries that can rupture at any point of the person s life most specifically when a person is at a heightened emotional state and stressed.

However, this weakness of the arteries may not just result from previous diseases like hypertension; it also entails its origin from congenital malformations like the arteriovenous malformations. This condition gives an outcome of arteries and veins entanglement inside the brain. The reason why malfunctions of the capillary beds happen that can contribute to the bulging of the arteries. The last type of Hemorrhagic Stroke is the subarachnoid bleeding. It is the most fatal form of stroke because it involves the main blood supply of the brain.

The symptoms of stroke, specifically for hemorrhagic stroke, comprise various manifestations depending on the bleeding location and the amount of damage it has resulted. The most typical report of patients who experienced this condition is headache. Wide-range physical and psychological assessments will reveal the level of the neurological dysfunctions that occurred. There are instances that the symptoms exhibited by the patients are just side effects of the treatment regimen given to them. The risk factors that are associated with the occurrence or stroke are gender, age and ethnicity.

This is an emergency situation where the diagnosis of its incidence is very important to determine what treatment is appropriate for the patient. It entails a number of high quality screening examinations. These screening tests are composed of imagery tests, electrical activity and blood flow tests. Complications may also arise during these conditions due to hypoxia such as seizure, cerebral vasospasm, increased intracranial pressure and systemic high blood pressure. Treatments for this condition are diverse and needs to be performed immediately to avert fatal damages or sudden death of the patient. The management of Hemorrhagic Stroke comprises a collaborative approach of using medications and undergoing surgical interventions.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of ovarian cysts?
    I just had an emergency D&C for hemorahing. I was told I had ovarian cysts as well as the usual thick uterine lining. They removed the cysts from my uterus, but how will the ones from my ovaries disolve. Also they put me on Micronor. I'm not thrilled at age 42 to be on birth control. Any risks?
    Also, since my D&C was 3 days ago, is it normal to have worse cramps today and heavier spotting with some clots?

    • ANSWER:
      Miconor is good, because it is a progesterone only pill (it doesn't contain any estrogen which is what increases a women's risk of blood clots and stroke. This should thin out your uterine lining that is causing your excessive bleeding.

      Ovarian cysts, although can range from asymptomatic to very painful, do not usually cause hemorrhaging, so I'm thinking they put you on the micronor to help with the bleeding, more than the ovarian cysts, although it should help shrink them slightly. Ovarian cyst can resolve on their own.

      Are you planning on having more children? If not, and the Micronor isn't effective, talk to your dr. about an uterine ablation. It's where they burn the lining of the uterus to stop the hemorrhaging. It often stops your periods for months, or for good! This is for people whos lives have been totally disrupted from heavy irregular bleeding.

      Oh and 1 more thing. DON"T rely on the Micronor as birth control. It has to be taken at the EXACT same time everyday or it is ineffective. And if you miss a pill forget it!!!

  2. QUESTION:
    Can birth control cause ovain cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      Birth-control pills have been used by over 150 million women world-wide. Much attention has been focused on comparing benefits and risks of birth-control pills.

      The benefits of taking the birth-control pill, aside from its almost l00% effectiveness in preventing pregnancy, are: less menstrual flow and cramping, lower risk of infection of the uterus and ovaries, a decreased chance of developing ovarian cysts and non-cancerous breast cysts and tumors, less ovarian cancer and uterine cancer, less rheumatoid arthritis, and it may improve acne.

      About 40% of women who take birth-control pills will have side effects of one kind or another during the first three months of use. The vast majority of women have only minor, transient side effects. Some of these side effects are: light bleeding between menstrual periods, skipped periods, nausea, weight change, bloating, increase in vaginal infections. Although it is difficult to predict whether a woman will develop one of these minor problems, a problem can often be eliminated by changing to a different birth-control pill. A spotty darkening of the skin on the face may appear and may be permanent.

      The most serious side effect associated with the birth-control pill is a greater chance of blood clots, stroke and heart attack. These problems occur in only a small number of women who take the pill. Women who have the most risk of developing these problems are women who smoke, are over thirty-five and women with other health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart or vascular disease or blood cholesterol and triglyceride abnormalities. Other serious side effects are worsening of migraine headaches, gall bladder disease, increase in blood pressure and an extremely rare liver tumor. Some birth-control pills may cause changes in the levels of fatty substances in the blood. The long-term consequences of these changes are not known. Regular check-ups are important for early detection of these problems.

      A good acronym for remembering danger signs is ACHES:

      A -for severe abdominal pain
      C -for severe chest pain or shortness of breath
      H -for severe throbbing headache
      E -for eye problems, such as flashing lights or vision disturbance
      S -for severe leg pains
      Certain drugs for epilepsy and tuberculosis, as well as certain antibiotics can reduce the effectiveness of the birth-control pill. St. John's Wort has also been known to reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. A woman taking birth-control pills should always ask her healthcare provider about any possible effect on birth-control pill effectiveness when another drug is prescribed so that she can use an additional backup method of birth-control.

      Taking birth-control pills does not seem to increase a woman's chances of developing cervical cancer or skin cancer. A few months after stopping birth-control pills, women who have taken pills become pregnant just as often as those who have not.

      Birth-control pills alone provide no protection against the transmission of AIDS or other sexually transmitted diseases. It is advisable to use condoms with the birth-control pill to help prevent these infections.

  3. QUESTION:
    What could be causing ovarian pain and abnormal menstral cycle when im not pregnant?
    about 6 months ago i started having extremely bad ovarian pains worse than contractions ever felt to me. i went to the hospital n they did blood work said nothing was wrong. the pains continued. then my periods started becoming irregular. theyd be a little late and short then one month it was 23 days late and lasted 2 days. i went to the hospital n they did a ct scan and a vaginal exam and blood work and told me my muscles were strained from carrying a heavy child. now my period is late again and im 100 percent sure im not pregnant and the pains are back. i dont understand what is causing this. im wondering if anyone else has gne through this and if so what was the cause?

    • ANSWER:
      I think it is polycystic ovarian syndrome. Here is some information about it:Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age. The name of the condition comes from the appearance of the ovaries in most, but not all, women with the disorder enlarged and containing numerous small cysts located along the outer edge of each ovary (polycystic appearance).

      Infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne and obesity can all occur in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Menstrual abnormality may signal the condition in adolescence, or PCOS may become apparent later following weight gain or difficulty becoming pregnant.

      The exact cause of polycystic ovary syndrome is unknown. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may have trouble becoming pregnant due to infrequent or lack of ovulation. Early diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome can help reduce the risk of long-term complications, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

  4. QUESTION:
    does i have the Policistic Ovary Syndrome coz the bulimia?
    i am scared that...can that make problems if i wanna have a baby? :(((

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS (Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome) does not cause Bulimia.

      If your hormones don't work in the normal way, your ovaries might make too many eggs. Those eggs turn into many cysts. The cysts (say: "sists") are like little balloons filled with liquid.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is called PCOS for short. Women in their childbearing years can get it. It often begins in the teenage years. It doesn't go away.

      Doctors don't know what causes PCOS. If you have PCOS, you may have a problem with the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Because of this problem, the hormones that control your ovaries and menstrual periods can become abnormal.

      If you have PCOS, you are more likely to get high blood pressure or diabetes. This means you have a greater risk for strokes and heart attacks.

      Because of irregular menstrual periods, women with PCOS are more likely to be infertile (unable to get pregnant). They may also have a higher risk for cancer of the uterus or breast.

      Your doctor will look for the signs of PCOS. Blood tests that measure your hormone levels can help. An ultrasound exam can show if you have cysts on your ovaries.

      If you have PCOS, you might need to lose weight. Medicine can help with your menstrual cycle, abnormal hair growth and acne. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, they have to be treated. If you want to have a baby, there are medicines that may help you get pregnant.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can HRT cause skin ageing?
    I have noticed a difference in my body over the past couple of months and feel that my body now looks older than it should. I am on estrogen only, and have been now for about a year, due to having to have a hystorecomy because of a cancer scare. Have any other women noticed this while on estrogen and if so is there some way to solve this problem? For some reason I have not noticed a difference in my face, only on my body. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have had a hysterectomy, including the loss of ovaries, you are Estrogen Dominant.
      And now, you are pumping MORE estrogen into your already overloaded hormone system.

      In addition, synthetic estrogen is known to CAUSE cancer!!

      Get a saliva test done to evaluate your hormone levels. I'm willing to bet that you need progesterone. NATURAL progesterone.

      Estrogen Dominance & What Are The Symptoms

      Doctors have historically recommended, and prescribed, synthetic estrogens and progestins to treat the symptoms of menopause and PMS. This is largely because most of the information that the doctors receive about new treatments are from the pharmaceutical companies. And because a product that can be produced naturally can not be patented the pharmaceutical companies have to create a synthetic version with a slightly modified molecule in order to patent the product.

      This however has been shown to be extremely unhealthy for your body. A New England Journal of Medicine article in 1995 involving 121,700 women showed that the chance of developing breast cancer went up to 40 percent in women that used estrogens and progestins (synthetic progesterone) for more than five years. Estrogen dominance is a term coined by Dr. Lee. It describes a condition where a woman can have deficient, normal, or excessive estrogen but has little or no progesterone to balance its effects in the body. Evan a woman with low estrogen levels can have estrogen-dominance symptoms if she doesn t have any progesterone.

      The symptoms and conditions associated with estrogen dominance are:
      ******Acceleration of the aging process******
      Allergy symptoms, including asthma, hives, rashes, sinus congestion
      Arthritis
      Autoimmune disorders such as lupus erythematosis and thyroiditis, and possible Sjogren s disease
      Breast cancer
      Breast cysts
      Breast tenderness
      Candida
      Cervical dysplasia
      Chronic fatigue
      Cold hands and feet as a symptom of thyroid dysfunction
      Copper excess
      Decreased sex drive
      Depression with anxiety or agitation
      Dry eyes
      Early onset of menstruation
      Endometriosis
      Endometrial (uterine) cancer
      Fat gain, especially around the abdomen, hips, and thigh
      Fatigue
      Fibrocystic breasts
      Foggy thinking
      Gallbladder disease
      Hair loss
      High blood pressure
      Headaches
      Hot flashes
      Hypoglycemia
      Increased blood clotting (increasing risk of strokes)
      Infertility
      Irregular menstrual periods
      Irritability
      Insomnia
      Magnesium deficiency
      Memory loss
      Mood swings
      Osteoporosis
      Painful swollen breasts
      PMS
      Polcystic ovaries
      Premenopausal bone loss
      Prostate cancer
      Sluggish metabolism
      Skin: Rosacea, rashes, dermatitis
      Thyroid dysfunction mimicking hypothyroidism
      Uterine cancer
      Uterine fibroids
      Water retention, bloating
      Yeast infection
      Zinc deficiency
      The above information was taken from "What Your Doctor may not tell you about Premenopause" by John R. Lee, M.D.

      John R. Lee, M.D. is internationally acknowledged as a pioneer and expert in the study and use of the hormone progesterone, and on the subject of hormone replacement therapy for women. He used transdermal progesterone extensively in his clinical practice for nearly a decade, doing research which showed that it can reverse osteoporosis.

  6. QUESTION:
    Will I go through early menopause if I get one ovary removed?
    I recently found out that I have a huge ovarian cyst on my left side and that I am going to need surgery ASAP! My gynecologist wants to remove the whole ovary because there is a very small chance that it could be malignant. Is there any possibility that it would cause me to go into early menopause if I keep the right ovary?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Jesus_is.., So sorry for your Medical condition and hope you will feel better soon. that said as to your question Your doctor may conduct an ovary removal, or oophorectomy, as part of a hysterectomy or if you have an abnormal growth. This surgery is often performed by laparoscopy so you can go home the same day or the following day.An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both your ovaries (female reproductive structure responsible for producing eggs and generating hormones). When one ovary is removed, the procedure is called a unilateral oophorectomy, and when both ovaries...Surgical menopause is the removal of a woman's ovaries during surgery. Only the ovaries may be removed, or the woman may have a partial or total hysterectomy. Removing the uterus and fallopian tubes will not cause surgical menopause, only the...If only one ovary is removed, the woman will not go through surgical menopause because there is still another ovary producing hormones.Know Who Needs Surgical Menopause, Women who have ovarian cancer may have their ovaries removed during surgery. Women who suffer from painful fibroid tumors may also opt to have the ovaries surgically removed. Some women who are genetically predisposed to breast and ovarian cancer opt to have their ovaries removed, especially if their sisters or mother have developed breast or ovarian cancer. Mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a high risk for breast or ovarian cancer. If there is a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, get genetic testing to find out if you have the mutation.All surgeries have risks that are serious considerations for you. Excessive blood loss, infection and complications from anesthesia are just some of the risks of all surgery. Other complications for removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy) include unintentional injury to other internal organs during surgery and intestinal blockages.Predicting Hot Flashes, Yes! You will have all the symptoms of natural menopause after surgery to remove the ovaries. You may experience one or all of these symptoms immediately after surgery including hot flashes, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, night sweats, vaginal dryness, diminished sex drive and fatigue, unless you start on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) right away. HRT can be in the form of a pill, gel or a patch prescribed in the lowest possible dosage,Understand Hormone Replacement Therapy ,Estrogen Therapy alone does increase the risk of uterine cancer, so most women are given a combination of estrogen and progestin, called Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or Hormone Therapy. If you've had a total hysterectomy and the uterus has been removed, you no longer have to worry about uterine cancer. Progestin protects the uterus from cancer, which is why it's combined with estrogen to provide protection against cancer in HRT. Most doctors agree that women should remain on HRT for no more than 5 years. Side effects of HRT can include headaches and breast pain. Some women temporarily gain water weight. More serious side effects of HRT include bleeding, cancer, stroke, heart disease, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Go for regular check ups while you're on HRT, and contact your doctor if you experience any unusual side effects. I hope all these information helped you with more knowledge which will take you from Zero to hero. Good luck best wishes hope you get better soon. Sorry for your problems but you will get better dear hope for the best.

  7. QUESTION:
    Im 21 with dermoid cyst and a complex cyst about to looses my ovarys?
    Im 21 with dermoid cyst and a complex cyst about to looses my ovarys.....the dermoid is 20cm the complex is 16cm...anyone go through the same thing or have cysts..please share

    • ANSWER:
      I have never had cyst or anything of that nature But I do know that by getting a complete Hysterectomy you do have other option. That is a Big Surgery. After you will have to take hormones for the rest of your life. that's a huge thing also. Since it might cause heart attack or stroke, cancer, many things. You need those Ovaries. Tell your Doctor that if all possible you would like to keep your ovaries and if he thinks you need a Complete Hysterectomy Then by all means get a second oppion, maybe even a third or forth opinion. It is your body. Sometimes them Doctor's might be to quick to say you need a Complete Hysterectomy, especially if you have insurance they can Milk. That is their Bread and Butter. And it is your Body. So remember that. God Bless You!

  8. QUESTION:
    For 3 years now with the Iud I have not had a period. My ovaries hurt quite often is that normal?
    When I pee, cough, bend over, I can really feel pain in my ovaries. Its mainly when I ovulate but I have noticed a big difference since I got the IUD 3 years ago. I'm woundering if going without a cycle for that long is good. I heard that a women had some form of BC and didnt have a cycle for 2 years, she passed out so they flew her to the near by hospital to find she had blood clots in her neck caused from her BC and she had a stroke and ended up dieing. How common is that?

    • ANSWER:
      One side effect with IUD is cysts on the ovaries. Call your GP or Gyn and tell them your symptoms. They will probably order an ultrasound to look at the ovaries.

      The whole BC story is a hoax that has been spread around through email. Check www.snopes.com for email hoaxes.

  9. QUESTION:
    causes of vaginal bleeding after complete hysterectomy?
    I had a complete hysterectomy 20 years ago and for the last two days have been having period like bleeding.

    • ANSWER:
      It would be irresponsible of me as a teacher of yoga to provide advice to you on this without a great deal more information. bleeding can be stopped with medicines and stop yoga for a period of six...
      i have had a hysterectomy due to heavy bleeding and ovarian cysts.can i still suffer from pcos
      system, so even if you had your ovaries removed with your hysterectomy, it is still possible... Version "Will a hysterectomyor oophorectomy cure my PCOS/PCOD? Unfo rtunately, there is no cure...
      Malpractice defense: Hysterectomy Leading to Vesicovaginal Fistula by David W. Patient Expert underwent a hysterectomy because of abnormal vaginal bleeding and abdominal discomfort from a large... / Response Stroke After Lung Surgery Shoulder Dystocia Spleen Injury and Bleed Cardiac Artery Disease...
      Malpractice defense: Left Ureter Kinked During Hysterectomy by David W. Patient Expert while the OBGYN physician placed sutures to close the vaginal cuff and control nearby bleeding... of the vaginal cuff . The second illustrated the defendant s view during the hysterectomy and suturing...
      Hysterectomy Facts by Cathy T. Healthy Living Professional to remove. * Vaginal hysterectomy. With this type, the doctor takes out the uterus through the vagina... -- Approximately 300 out of every 100,000 women will undergo a hysterectomy. -- hysterectomy...
      Effect of Hysterectomy on Female Sexual Function by Dr. Jennifer Berman Medical Doctor , estrogens have vasoprotective and vasodilatory roles, resulting in increased vaginal and clitoral arterial flow, aiding in the prevention of vaginal atrophy and vaginal smooth muscle fibrosis (Berman, Berman...
      WHAT IS VAGINAL CUFF GRANULOMA?
      to either injury (like surgery) or infection. There can be a number of reasons for bleeding and discharge...?) Are the bleeding and cramping related to any specific activity such as sexual activity or bowel movements...
      Can I be pregnant and still have vaginal bleeding? by April G. Yes. Up to 25 percent of pregnant women have light vaginal bleeding, or spotting, during the first... than a menstrual period. But any vaginal bleeding during pregnancy or a suspected pregnancy should be taken...
      Vaginal bleeding!
      what is called a progesterone spike.. when the level sudden falls it causes what is known as a "withdrawl bleed"... sheding any lining she may have developed in her uterus and RESTARTING her cycle. That day of bleed...
      Bleeding from vaginal area(Maltese) by heru m. Patient Expert . QUESTION: My female maltese is bleeding from her vaginal area. She was found to have no infection... and still bleeds. She is not showing ant discomfort and is playing, eating and acting just fine. She has no pain...

  10. QUESTION:
    i was thinking to get on ?
    birth control pills for my cyst in my ovaries , but i don't know for sure cause i use to smoke in 2008 when i was 15 but stop smoking in 2008 in august, should i get on the pills?

    • ANSWER:
      If you're not smoking anymore than yes get on this pill. Cyst can be serious if you get too many or get to big. They can get stuck to other organs or burst. If you are still smoking, talk to your doctor about help with quitting. Your chances of having a stroke or blood clot increase.

  11. QUESTION:
    What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and do you have some info on it?
    My doctor just told me recently she thinks I have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. She really didn't explain to me what it was, so I am just wondering.

    I am 14 years old and I have type 2 diabetes, so how could this effect me?

    Any information you have can help, thanks.
    I have had Insulin Resistance already.

    And can you get rid of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age. The name of the condition comes from the appearance of the ovaries in most, but not all, women with the disorder enlarged and containing numerous small cysts located along the outer edge of each ovary (polycystic appearance).

      Infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne and obesity can all occur in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Menstrual abnormality may signal the condition in adolescence, or PCOS may become apparent later following weight gain or difficulty becoming pregnant.

      The exact cause of polycystic ovary syndrome is unknown. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may have trouble becoming pregnant due to infrequent or lack of ovulation. Early diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome can help reduce the risk of long-term complications, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

  12. QUESTION:
    What can reduce the pain of menstual cramps?
    My daughter is 18. Hot liquids, heating pad, ibupofen, do not help. Used to have cyst on ovary but birth control pills dryed it up. Okay for awhile after cyst, then cramps returned. They are so bad she vomits. Dr says hormones must be ok because she is regular. So she gave her b.c. pills again because they take away the cramps. Don't the pills make you gain weight, and don't they lead to strokes?

    • ANSWER:
      crunches work on me. or some light walking. some pills, not all, cause weight gain. also there r other forms of bc like a patch or the nuva ring. a doc can better tell u some options and side effects. strokes and blood clots happen more often when the user is a smoker

  13. QUESTION:
    can someone recommend a safe low hormone birth control?
    my niece has been diagnosed with cysts on ovaries but has a weight problem. the doctors want to put her on birth control and im afraid it will make her gain weight. someone recommended low hormone pill but with all the commercials talking about the newer birth control causing strokes and death...im am at a loss! please recommend something safe for a 14 yr old girl.

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    what is PCOS?
    It has something to do with ovulation and overweight women, but I don't know what exactly it is.

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      What is polycystic ovary syndrome? Who gets it?

      If your hormones don't work in the normal way, your ovaries might make too many eggs. Those eggs turn into many cysts. The cysts (say: "sists") are like little balloons filled with liquid.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is called PCOS for short. Women in their childbearing years can get it. It often begins in the teenage years. It doesn't go away.

      What are the signs of PCOS?

      Usually, women with PCOS have irregular menstrual periods. After a while, some women stop having any periods. Women with PCOS may have trouble getting pregnant.

      About 70 percent of women with PCOS have extra hair growing in the sideburn area of their face and on their chin, upper lip, nipple area, chest, lower abdomen and thighs. They may get acne. About half are obese. Some women with PCOS have no signs of it.

      What causes PCOS?
      Doctors don't know what causes PCOS. If you have PCOS, you may have a problem with the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Because of this problem, the hormones that control your ovaries and menstrual periods can become abnormal.

      Does PCOS cause long-term problems?

      If you have PCOS, you are more likely to get high blood pressure or diabetes. This means you have a greater risk for strokes and heart attacks.

      Because of irregular menstrual periods, women with PCOS are more likely to be infertile (unable to get pregnant). They may also have a higher risk for cancer of the uterus or breast.

      How can my doctor tell that I have PCOS?

      Your doctor will look for the signs of PCOS. Blood tests that measure your hormone levels can help. An ultrasound exam can show if you have cysts on your ovaries.

      How is PCOS treated?

      If you have PCOS, you might need to lose weight. Medicine can help with your menstrual cycle, abnormal hair growth and acne. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, they have to be treated. If you want to have a baby, there are medicines that may help you get pregnant.

  15. QUESTION:
    pregnant or something else?
    so i am currently 17 years old and i have a cyst on my right ovary that i found out on jan. 11, 2011. in december i got my period a week and half early and it lasted for about 2 weeks, it ended on december 30,2010. yes i had unprotected sex in december and january. On january 5th i started bleeding, it lasted for 3 days. (really heavy the first day and much lighter the next day and the last) i was on the pill in december but stopped when i got my period. my period was suppose to come on january 20th and is currently 20 days late. my gyn toldd me on the 13 to take a pregnancy test in 2 weeks and if negative then start my new pack of pills. i started taking them on january 29th, 2011 and as of feb. 8 i started "spotting" a really light light color brownish discharge, it was so light that i didnt even need to use a tampon or a pad.i do have some pregnancy symptoms like sleeping more, urinating more, my breasts are getting a tad bit bigger but they do not hurt, and i have had lower abdominal pains along with lower back aches. also im not sure if this is associated with any of this or not but when i blow my nose their is blood in the tissue and i have been bruising easily. oh and also the two pregnancy tests were negative, i would really appreciate peoples opinions on my situation. THANKS :)
    i was on the pill for at least 3 months straight in december when i stopped taking it bc i got my period early as well.

    • ANSWER:
      First off, get a new Doctor. If you have a cyst on your ovary it should be removed NOW and from what I understand if you do have an ovarian cyst you should NOT be taking the pill. It has estrogen which encourages the cyst to grow. I should know I had an ovarian cyst that turned out to be much worse than anticipated by my Doctor. If it had been dealt with earlier I would not have ended up with a tumor and having an ovary removed! Also, your doctor should have told you this: An ovarian cyst almost always causes a pregnancy test to give a positive result (even when you are NOT pregnant)! So if your doctor told you to take a pregnancy test than that is just WRONG! It is scary that this doctor is out there practicing medicine on unsuspecting patients! Your doctor should have you in for a wand ultrasound to determine the size of the cyst and the visibly verify if you are pg and you should be scheduled for surgery now rather than wait. It is your body and you need to take responsibility for it. DEMAND that your doctor follow the correct procedures and if he/she won't then file a complaint with the medical board and find another OBGYN.

      As far as being pregnant, you will find out if your doctor does their job correctly. For you, with an ovarian cyst, there is not another option that I know of. Oh BTW too much estrogen can cause blood clotting with can lead to 'throwing' a blood clot, which can cause major damage up to and including a stroke no matter how old you are.

  16. QUESTION:
    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, I think I have it, but how can I find out for sure? I'm so scared =[?
    I'm 18, I have started to grow hair in weird places, like my tummy, lower back, upper lip, chin, and even face ..

    Also, my periods have been lasting less and less time ..
    They used to go on for 6 full days, and now it it basically only 4 or 3 days.

    I have been breaking out on my face, and back with acne bad, and I have a lot of trouble losing weight ..

    It is driving my crazy all I do is cry because I HATE having hair in these places, it makes me feel so uncomfortable ..

    I don't know what do to .. I heard that you can't have kids when you have this disease ..

    Should I go to a regular doctor for this, or should I go to a specialist about the disease .. ? Is there any medications that they put you on to help with the bad symptoms like facial hair and body hair? the weight problem? the acne problems?

    thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      I am 19 and I was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) 2 weeks ago. It sounds scary, but with the right medical attention and treatment, you will be fine. The first thing you want to do is find either a family doctor or gynecologist. They will do blood tests on you and an ultrasound, to see the cysts. The blood tests will show abnormal hormone levels, which causes irreguler periods and hair. Once diagnosed, the doctor will put on you birth control, most likely Yazmin or another Pill that helps regulate your period. I was also put on Provera, a hormone pill. I was told that getting pregant will be difficult, but there is hope.Having PCOS puts you at a higher risk for heart attacks, Type 2 diabetes, and strokes. There are also support groups you can go to for advice and support. Good Luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with Pcos and possibly pregnant?
    I was just diagnosed with PCOS a week ago and I have a 6 month old daughter. My periods have been very regular all my life (since I started at age 9) and I conceived a healthy little girl who is 6 months old I know that you are born with Pcos and it is genetic but since I had a baby already and they didn't find the cysts until just now would my periods still be regular? Also my periods started becoming regular again in July so 3 months after I had my daughter and now I am 2 weeks late on my period and am possibly pregnant I took a pregnancy test on the 18th and it was negative but I would only be about 3 weeks counting from conception (2 weeks when I took the test) so my question is would pcos make my periods late even though they have been regular all my life? Any advice on anything would be great please and thank you

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS can deffinatly make your periods late. (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age. The name of the condition comes from the appearance of the ovaries in most, but not all, women with the disorder enlarged and containing numerous small cysts located along the outer edge of each ovary (polycystic appearance).

      Infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne and obesity can all occur in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Menstrual abnormality may signal the condition in adolescence, or PCOS may become apparent later following weight gain or difficulty becoming pregnant.

      The exact cause of polycystic ovary syndrome is unknown. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may have trouble becoming pregnant due to infrequent or lack of ovulation. Early diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome can help reduce the risk of long-term complications, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

      Try googling pcos it may help you find what your looking for.

  18. QUESTION:
    TTC please help!?
    Hi,
    I have been charting my temperature for the last 2 months.
    This last month it seems that I have a very long cycle seems it seems that I ovulated the 18th July (day 25).
    As per my tracking sheet the temperature raised on that day and in fact the days before the 18th I had lots of white egg mucus, that's why I assumed was cause I was about to ovulate.
    On the 16th July (2 days before the ovulation) I went for a blood test to check if my hormone level.
    And in fact my doctor said that was in fact too low. I said that I think I have actually ovulate on the 18th but she said that she suspect that because it is too low close to ovulation I may have some problem with my ovary like PCOS. She also said that it is very unlikely that I'm pregnant. :(
    Because she is suspecting that I have PCOS she want me to have an ultrasound to my ovary to check if what she suspect is right.
    I will have the ultrasound in the next few weeks. when they should perform the ultrasound, only closer to ovulation or they can do it at any time?
    But whyit seems that I was ovulating but my hormone level was too low?
    So charting temperature and mucus will not detect if there are some problem?

    please help!
    TTC for 17 months!

    • ANSWER:
      I have PCOS. You can ovulate with PCOS on your own, I have 2 kids naturally that prove it, and 1 kid through fertility.

      I was not dx by ultrasound. I was dx at age 19, and have had a cyst rupture and was hospitalized at age 29. Typically PCOS women ovulate infrequently, and irregularly, hence the long cycles. PCOS does not need to be dx by an ultrasound. They may not find any cysts and you still can have it.

      Charting the temp and mucus will not detect a problem.

      PCOS is when the ovaries do not produce the right hormone levels to conceive, and cysts occur on the ovaries. Its kinda like premature ovarian failure but its not complete.

      Ask your doc to check your A1C level. This is bloodsugar averages for 3months. This may or may not be elevated, mine is not but is near the ceiling of normal 5.7. Ask for a script for Metformin, this is a type II diabetic med that will help keep your blood sugars lower and decrease the chances of cysts and increase the chances of the ovaries producing the right level of hormones. Most women with PCOS take 500mg 3X/day. Even not being diabetic some women have sensitive reproductive systems that do not do well with surges of blood sugar. This is why the Southbeach diet, or something following a low-glycemic index is recommended.

      Also ask for your doc to check for a +ACLA (anti-cardiolipid antibody), it is also called lupus anticoagulent. This is a common co-morbidity of PCOS and basically causes you to have sludgy thick blood. It is easily fixed by blood thinners (baby aspirin). The thick blood can cause an increased chance for you to have difficulty implanting, miscarriage by clotting off the oxygen to the baby, an abrupted placenta, stroke or heart attack.

      You hear of a lot of PCOS women having multiple miscarriages, the reasons for this are the progesterone levels, or a +ACLA. Both can be controlled.

      I had to take a hcg trigger shot to conceive (ovidrel). I ovulated day 26. Also once pregnant my ovaries did not make enough progesterone to support the pregnancy typical in PCOS women and I had to supplement with progesterone. Once pregnant make sure they monitor your progesterone levels. Once you hit 12 weeks the placenta takes over the progesterone production.

      I got pregnant taking clomid 50mg. I also took baby aspirin and fragmin to thin the blood, metformin to help regulate my ovaries, robitussin to thin my CM, and ovidrel to trigger ovulation.

      Before going to an expensive reproductive endocrinologist (we spent 24,000 dollars at 1 for 9 months treatment) do all you can with your gyn. Once at the RE, they will do many things that your gyn can do. U/S, check LH (leutenizing hormone), FSH (follicle stimulating hormone), and progesterone levels. An RE will want you on metformin after checking your A1C level, and try clomid. An RE will also check you for +ACLA. You can do all this with your gyn.

  19. QUESTION:
    Contraceptive pill?
    Does anyone actually know if the contraceptive pill used for LT like 5 yrs actually cause any significant health risks in a healthy under 25yr old?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many pros and cons of the pill.

      Some side effects can be heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, etc. but many of these aren't as prevelant as they once were. Most pills now are considered "low dose" (i.e. they are much lower in levels of hormones than they were when they initially were introduced) and incidents of these side effects have been greatly reduced over the years as the formulations change. Currently, there is little concern for a healthy non-smoking female using these pills.

      It has been shown, however, that the pill decreases the risk of cancer to the ovaries and cancer of the endometrium, anemia caused by too much blood loss, reduction of benign cysts, etc.

      The FDA's stance is that the benefits of the pill far outweight the side effects for most health females, but those who smoke, are at a high risk for heart disease and high blood pressure, and the obese not take the pill since all of these groups would put them in a higher risk category for the adverse side effects.

      In the years of using the pill by the general population, I have yet to hear a huge problem over side effects cause by them, so I believe they are safe to use (assuming you aren't in one of the three groups above that shouldn't).

  20. QUESTION:
    Elective hysterectomy in 23 year old?
    I am 23 and looking into the possibility of an elective hysterectomy.
    I gave birth at 20 with my husbands child. My husband and I are still together [soon celebrating 5 years of marriage]
    I do not wish to have any more children.
    Last year I was diagnosed with a cyst on my ovary. It went naturally within 4 weeks of it being diagnosed. I have had issues with pelvic pain for the last two years. I have been told that some months, my egg bursts from the ovary faster than a normal release [I hope this makes sense] but the pain is excruciating. My husband has to help me walk short distances from the sofa to the bathroom as I can't walk it. I am unable to walk the dog because of the pain. I take tramadol and have taken codridamol, co-codamol and diclofenic for this, and it only eases the pain for the first hour after taking it. I have had a conversation with my husband, and we both agree that due to lack of funds, we wouldn't be able to offer another child a secure future. The pain at the moment is agonising. I was referred to a gynaecologist last year, who is the one who diagnosed the cyst and the ovary issue. I have now had enough of spending every other month in pain, even when I am not menstruating, [like now]. My periods themselves are very painful also.

    As for contraceptive, I can only take the mini pill. I have something called Factor V Lieden which basically means the pregnancy hormone is present in my bloodstream, my blood thickens and clots, leaving me liable to stroke, DVT and even more illnesses. Therefore I am unable to use things such as the pill, the inplant, and the injection. I had the IUD fitted [copper, not marina] and that did nothing to help the issues. I have had Pelvic Inflammatory disease in the past also. My husband and I are both clean of and STI's or STD's and are both faithful [100%] so we know there are no diseases present causing this issues.

    Do you think an elective hysterectomy is a good option? If not, what other alternatives are there?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Ugh, I'm so sorry. That's really rough. But it's not clear from what you've said if your pain is all the time or just some of the time. And you haven't explained why you have pain, beyond the cyst and the ovulation. Ovulation should only hurt for an hour at most, and cysts do go away or can be surgically removed but shouldn't be every month. It's hard to judge what will fix the pain without that information. However, it sounds like an elective hysterectomy would be a very bad option. If you had a hysterectomy--and incidentally, what you're talking about here isn't a hysterectomy, it's a total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy--then you'd have problems 24/7/365, while maybe you only have pain some of the time now? But without ovaries then you'd go into surgical menopause, which is much worse than natural menopause, and the worst of the symptoms would last until you were 50. And you couldn't take estrogen to ease those problems because of the Factor V Leiden. And you couldn't undo the surgery, either--it would be permanent. So if you found the situation to be worse, then you'd be stuck. If you had the surgery, then you'd almost certainly suffer from sexual side effects--loss of sexuality, because you'd be castrated. And you'd get osteoporosis. And your lifespan would be shortened by more than 10 years, on average, due to ongoing damage to your heart, blood vessels, colon, and brain, that would be progressive, since your body needs those hormones, hence the shortening of lifespan and increased risk of Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's.

      Question: do you currently take the mini pill? because it can usually stop ovulation, though it doesn't do it as well as the combined pill. Can you use Mirena IUD? Also, have you been checked for endometriosis? That might be a possible diagnosis, and they can only tell that by surgery. If you do have endometriosis, then getting your uterus removed would actually be a good option, because it would take away at least some of the pain and the doc could also remove endometrial implants, taking away more of the pain. You'd still get endometrial changes every month, which could be a problem, but it would do a lot towards making it not be as bad and not get worse, to do a hysterectomy. You'd still keep the ovaries, though. Often what they do in these situations is remove the uterus and then give you Lupron, which shuts your ovaries down for like 6 months or so. As a result, all of the endometrial implants die off. Then your ovaries start working again but without a uterus, there are no new implants and the pain is gone or at least lessened. Getting Lupron simulates what it would be like to not have your ovaries. You'll feel quite miserable, and you'll be glad that your ovaries will still be there to start working again.

  21. QUESTION:
    My doctor prescribed me kariva to sluff my uterine lining. What are the side effects?
    The average smoker, evidently, smokes a pack a day. I only smoke five. Is this going to significantly increase my risk of heart attack and stroke? My dad has heart disease. I exercise a lot and eat very healthy foods to avoid this. My hair is falling out due to ovarian cysts. I heard that birth control can cause hair loss. Will this help with my ovarian problems and maybe stop my hair from falling out? I am supposed to start this today, but I am scared. I also have a history of depression and refuse to take antidepressants. I read that birth control causes depressions. Any thoughts?
    Weight Gain?

    • ANSWER:
      Doctors are going to give you some drug that will end up damaging your body they call "Side effects." There is NOTHING "Side" about that. The drug simply damages you. Smoking is putting your body in a state of constant stress and causing your Adrenal glands to become insufficient, along with polluting your lungs and to say you only smoke 5 cigarettes per day like it is going to be better than smoking a pack a day is like saying well "He only died a little bit."

      Ovarian cysts are due to nutritional deficiencies. Hair loss is often linked to poor diet, especially consumption of fried foods, hydrogenated oils and INFECTION (including bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic) that may be in the scalp itself (often causing dandruff) or it may be a systemic infection. It's also linked to mineral deficiencies, intestinal infections (where waste products backup into the liver, that can affect the head and scalp. Mineral deficiencies can be caused by infections ANYWHERE in the body and a deficiency in co-factors that allow the body to even absorb what is consumed. Lack of sunlight, heavy metal exposure (especially due to bad dentistry that is rampant in the U.S. now due to the materials, chemicals, and procedures being followed as a "standard of care" dentistry), etc.

      If his hair is coming out in clumps, that is typically a parasite. If it is male pattern baldness, that is typically due to dihydrotestosterone (a derivative of testosterone) "DHT" that hardens the galea (skin on top of the head) and chokes the hair follicle to death, resulting in hair loss.

      This type of hair loss can be slowed and even reversed by eating a high quality Oat Grass because the Oat Grass prevents the formation of the DHT.

      There is some genetic issues, but contrary to popular belief, it is very small. Most are due to the above factors.

      When you have problems with your hair, it is a reflection of the condition of your blood. Smoking takes oxygen out of your body and that is why people who smoke age must faster, get wrinkles, and smell like old goat hair. Kissing someone who smokes is like kissing an ashtray.

      Depressions is a nutritional deficiency in most every case, except for a few people that have been traumatized in some way. Have you every known anyone to be deficient in any drug?

      Birth control negatively affects the ovaries. The ovaries along with thyroid, pituitary, and adrenal glands are part of the pituitary axis that when one of these glands get sick, they ALL get sick together. Fatigue, gaining weight, hormone issues, etc. are all due to taking birth control pills.

      Doctors will give you a bunch of drugs and "Hope they work." A nutritional therapist will work with you to develop a good diet, teach you how to nourish your body, give supplement advice, and put you on the road to real health, not that drug induced "MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH."

      good luck to you

  22. QUESTION:
    what is pcos?
    hi i am currently on the ivf waiting list as i have blocked tubes, i need to lose weight before they can carry on, but now my doctor has said he thinks im in the early stages of pcos, and im to find out about it and then come back, im 22 can anybody shed some light on this.

    • ANSWER:
      It's-- polycystic ovary syndrome:
      If your hormones don't work in the normal way, your ovaries might release too many eggs. Those eggs turn into many cysts. The cysts are like little balloons filled with liquid.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is called PCOS for short. Women in their childbearing years can get it. It often begins in the teenage years. It doesn't go away.

      Usually, women with PCOS have irregular menstrual periods. After a while, some women stop having any periods. Women with PCOS may have trouble getting pregnant.

      About 70 percent of women with PCOS have extra hair growing in the sideburn area of their face and on their chin, upper lip, nipple area, chest, lower abdomen and thighs. They may get acne. About half are obese. Some women with PCOS have no signs of it.

      Doctors don't know what causes PCOS. If you have PCOS, you may have a problem with the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Because of this problem, the hormones that control your ovaries and menstrual periods can become abnormal.

      If you have PCOS, you are more likely to get high blood pressure or diabetes. This means you have a greater risk for strokes and heart attacks.

      Because of irregular menstrual periods, women with PCOS are more likely to be infertile (unable to get pregnant). They may also have a higher risk for cancer of the uterus or breast.

      Your doctor will look for the signs of PCOS. Blood tests that measure your hormone levels can help. An ultrasound exam can show if you have cysts on your ovaries.

      If you have PCOS, you might need to lose weight. Medicine can help with your menstrual cycle, abnormal hair growth and acne. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, they have to be treated. If you want to have a baby, there are medicines that may help you get pregnant.

      Good luck!!

  23. QUESTION:
    ive got a dark brown discharge?
    and im really scared. ive only had it today, but it is really dark. like i forgot to take my yazmin medicine for a few days,and when you forget to take it, you get your period, but i havent had any blood. do you think it is because i took my medicine today? im so scared, please help.

    • ANSWER:
      You may have: Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's menstrual cycle, ability to have children, hormones, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. With PCOS, women typically have:

      high levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, although females also make them.
      missed or irregular periods
      many small cysts (sists) in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.

      About one in ten women of childbearing age has PCOS. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old. PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility (not being able to get pregnant).

      The cause of PCOS is unknown. Most researchers think that more than one factor could play a role in developing PCOS. Genes are thought to be one factor. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Researchers also think insulin could be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. For many women with PCOS, their bodies have problems using insulin so that too much insulin is in the body. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. This hormone is made in fat cells, the ovaries, and the adrenal gland. Levels of androgen that are higher than normal can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and problems with ovulation.

      Most researchers think that PCOS runs in families. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Still, there is no proof that PCOS is inherited.

      Not all women with PCOS share the same symptoms. These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating
      increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes a condition called hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um)
      ovarian cysts
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      pelvic pain
      anxiety or depression due to appearance and/or infertility
      sleep apnea excessive snoring and times when breathing stops while asleep

      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman's uterus. A woman's ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs also are called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one matures fully. As this one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release it. The egg then travels through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. Follicles may start to grow and build up fluid. But no one follicle becomes large enough. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. Since no follicle becomes large enough and no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman's menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the cysts make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.

      Because PCOS affects many systems in the body, many symptoms persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. During the physical exam the doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check out the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. Your doctor might want to do a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your ch

  24. QUESTION:
    why am i having dark brown vaginal discharge?
    here's the thing, i had my period for almost two years. and then about 6 months ago it stopped. haven't had it sense. I'm a virgin. and i've never had oral sex either. two weeks ago i started having this thick brown discharge that idk if other ppl can smell, but i can. it grosses me out. also sometimes i have cramps LIKE i'm just getting my period. i want to avoid having to tell my mom and go to the doctor at all costs. how long does this have to continue before i get worried?
    anybody have anything besides the expected go to the doctor answer?

    • ANSWER:
      You may have: Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's menstrual cycle, ability to have children, hormones, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. With PCOS, women typically have:

      high levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, although females also make them.
      missed or irregular periods
      many small cysts (sists) in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.

      About one in ten women of childbearing age has PCOS. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old. PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility (not being able to get pregnant).

      The cause of PCOS is unknown. Most researchers think that more than one factor could play a role in developing PCOS. Genes are thought to be one factor. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Researchers also think insulin could be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. For many women with PCOS, their bodies have problems using insulin so that too much insulin is in the body. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. This hormone is made in fat cells, the ovaries, and the adrenal gland. Levels of androgen that are higher than normal can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and problems with ovulation.

      Most researchers think that PCOS runs in families. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Still, there is no proof that PCOS is inherited.

      Not all women with PCOS share the same symptoms. These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating
      increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes a condition called hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um)
      ovarian cysts
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      pelvic pain
      anxiety or depression due to appearance and/or infertility
      sleep apnea excessive snoring and times when breathing stops while asleep

      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman's uterus. A woman's ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs also are called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one matures fully. As this one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release it. The egg then travels through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. Follicles may start to grow and build up fluid. But no one follicle becomes large enough. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. Since no follicle becomes large enough and no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman's menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the cysts make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.

      Because PCOS affects many systems in the body, many symptoms persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. During the physical exam the doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check out the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. Your doctor might want to do a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals.

  25. QUESTION:
    i have not gotten my period in about 6 months and i think the reason may be because of my recent 20 pound?
    weight loss. i do have an eating disorder (which i am working very hard to overcome) but it is not too extreme. i was thinking this was the reason for my irregular periods, but then i realized that before i started my irregular eating habits i had irregular periods as well. once i start eating more normally do you htink they will come back? and i am 17 at the moment and by the time i want to have children do you think i will have any problems? please give me your input!

    • ANSWER:
      This could be: Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's menstrual cycle, ability to have children, hormones, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. With PCOS, women typically have:

      high levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, although females also make them.
      missed or irregular periods
      many small cysts (sists) in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.

      About one in ten women of childbearing age has PCOS. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old. PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility (not being able to get pregnant).

      The cause of PCOS is unknown. Most researchers think that more than one factor could play a role in developing PCOS. Genes are thought to be one factor. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Researchers also think insulin could be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. For many women with PCOS, their bodies have problems using insulin so that too much insulin is in the body. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. This hormone is made in fat cells, the ovaries, and the adrenal gland. Levels of androgen that are higher than normal can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and problems with ovulation.

      Most researchers think that PCOS runs in families. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Still, there is no proof that PCOS is inherited.

      Not all women with PCOS share the same symptoms. These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating
      increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes a condition called hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um)
      ovarian cysts
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      pelvic pain
      anxiety or depression due to appearance and/or infertility
      sleep apnea excessive snoring and times when breathing stops while asleep

      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman's uterus. A woman's ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs also are called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one matures fully. As this one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release it. The egg then travels through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. Follicles may start to grow and build up fluid. But no one follicle becomes large enough. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. Since no follicle becomes large enough and no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman's menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the cysts make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.

      Because PCOS affects many systems in the body, many symptoms persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. During the physical exam the doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check out the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. Your doctor might want to do a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals.

  26. QUESTION:
    Medical Question?
    I'm on depo provera for cysts. I had my left ovary taken out two years ago and Im only 18. I asked my doctor how much longer I would have to be on the shot and he said probably my whole life until I wanted kids. He said we could stop it for a month and see how I do, and try a low dose bc.pill . but see Im allergic to the pills they put me in the hospital.. I don't want to be on this forever and I don't know what I should do.. anyone have any pointers?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, your doctor is wanting to preserve your remaining ovary as much as possible by supressing all ovulation. That in turn prevents you from forming another cyst, which could become a rouge cyst. Rogue cysts leave scars on the ovary, and eventually enough scar tissue creates it's own problems. Since you've lost one ovary already to this, you already know what those problems are like. Since the pills have made you ill, there aren't a lot of other choices, beyond losing that remaining ovary. On the chance you may at some point want to be a mother, it makes sense to supress it and conserve it as much as you can. Using chemical means to supress a normal body function may seem extreme to you at this point, but it is the best way to accomplish the goal. As it is now, you have only a few choices. You can certainly quit taking the Depo, and replace it with a low dose pill. That will risk becoming ill again, and raise the possibility of another rogue cyst forming. You could quit taking hormones all together, and you know what is likely to happen there. Nobody can tell you how many you will form, nor how many times it will happen. No body can tell you how much damage this ovary will take before it ceases to function properly and causes scarring or problems that will end with you in the hospital facing the loss of it. If you lose both ovaries, you will experience menopause, with all the changes which accompany it. At 18, or even in your mid 20's, that's quite an adaption to make. And you become open to all the same risks as all other post-menopausal women- that is increased risk for heart problems, stroke, and the secondary irritants like vaginal dryness, loss of sex drive, and increased facial hair. Not to mention, no ovaries equals no pregnancy, no kids. You will not have to be on birth control, like Depo forever. After you are older, and have your children if you want, and after the last child is born, you can opt to have the last ovary removed. Then you won't need them any more. But for right now, at your age, I'd suggest sticking with the Depo. You are still young, and they are safe for you to take for many years yet. The risks from taking it are far less than the risk of developing more ovarian cysts and eventually being forced into surgical menopause in your 20's. As a young woman with a great deal of life yet to come and be experienced, I say you should do what you can reasonably do to preserve your choices in the future. If and when it comes to no better options, once you've had the chance to consider parenthood, then it may become a subject again. Until then, though, just stick with the Depo.

  27. QUESTION:
    Pregnant with mirena?
    So here's my situation....about 2 weeks ago I had mirena inserted, but before I had it inserted my period was 2 weeks late( however I still got my period before the iud wad inserted). The Dr gave me a urine hcg test the day of my insertion and it came back negative. I had the iud inserted and it was fine for the first week and then I started having bad lower back and prelvic cramping. Then a few days later I started having light brown spotting and have vomited two mornings in a row so I'm starting to think maybe I was pregnant when they put the iud in. Any comments is appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I highly doubt it. What you are experiencing is probably side effects from the Mirena really starting to kick in and adjust your hormones. If you were two weeks late on the day your doctor gave you the HCG pregnancy test and you WERE pregnant, it would have most definitely come back positive. All your symptoms can be explained by the Mirena. Have you read the packet that comes with the IUD? Here is some patient information on common side effects directly from the Mirena site:

      Common side effects of Mirena include:
      Pain, bleeding or dizziness during and after placement. If
      these symptoms do not stop, Mirena may not have been
      placed correctly. Your healthcare provider will examine you
      to see if Mirena needs to be removed or replaced.
      Expulsion. Mirena may come out by itself. This is called
      expulsion. You may become pregnant if Mirena comes
      out. If you notice that Mirena has come out, use a
      backup birth control method like condoms and call your
      healthcare provider.
      Missed menstrual periods. About 2 out of 10 women
      stop having periods after 1 year of Mirena use. If you
      do not have a period for 6 weeks during Mirena use,
      call your healthcare provider. When Mirena is removed,
      your menstrual periods will come back.
      Changes in bleeding. Youmay have bleeding and spotting
      between menstrual periods, especially during the first 3
      to 6 months. Sometimes the bleeding is heavier than
      usual at first. However, the bleeding usually becomes
      lighter than usual and may be irregular. Call your
      healthcare provider if the bleeding remains heavier than
      usual or if the bleeding becomes heavy after it has been
      light for a while.
      Cyst on the ovary. About 12 out of 100 women using
      Mirena develop a cyst on the ovary. These cysts usually
      disappear on their own in a month or two. However,
      cysts can cause pain and sometimes cysts will need
      surgery.
      This is not a complete list of possible side effects with
      Mirena. For more information, ask your healthcare provider.

      Call your healthcare provider if you have any concerns
      about Mirena. Be sure to call if you:
      Think you are pregnant.
      Have pelvic pain or pain during sex.
      Have unusual vaginal discharge or genital sores.
      Have unexplained fever.
      Might be exposed to sexually transmitted diseases
      (STDs).
      Cannot feel Mirena s threads.
      Develop very severe or migraine headaches.
      Have yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes. These
      may be signs of liver problems.
      Have a stroke or heart attack.
      Or your partner becomes HIV positive.
      Have severe vaginal bleeding or bleeding that lasts a
      long time.

      As you can see, the hormonal changes can easily cause most of your symptoms. Even though it doesn't go into detail, ovarian cysts can cause lots of back pain and pelvic cramping. I, too, have gotten sick to my stomach from having them they get so bad sometimes. It DOES say to call your doctor if you think you may be pregnant, however, so I would call him just to be sure. But keep in mind, Mirena can be hard on you for the first few rounds of your period. Good luck!

  28. QUESTION:
    Whats your guess?? What do you think?
    Okay, My sister in law has been sick 4 times this year with the same problem. She vomits runs fevers is always sore and forgets things. She also slurs when trying to speak. It sounds like shes taking a stroke. The second time she was checked out she had cyst on her ovaries which caused infection to run through her body and eat the micros from her brain. The cyst were removed and she was on antibiotics. She has not been the same since. Now the same thing is happening again. The hospitals keep sending her home and I am scared she is going to end up dead. What can be wrong???

    • ANSWER:
      When I read your question, I thought immediately about the possibility of her infection being an antibiotic resistant strain. God forbid, something like MRSA. She needs to have a complete blood workup and scans. Also, for immediate treatment, have her take grapefruit seed extract, as it is a natural antibiotic. You can take it in pill form or in drops to add to juice. I hope she is better soon.

  29. QUESTION:
    does anyone have a septate uterus?
    i have had 4 miscarriages and went for a internal examination, and i have polycystic ovaries and a septate uterus, and i was suppose to be having the septate cut away today, when i got to the hospital, he said he isnt going to do the operation today he wants me to go back in december to have a look from the top of the uterus instead of underneath and he said that he doesnt think that the septate was the cause of misscarage because i had the pregnancy sac inside my uterus, my last misscarage was 5 months ago and im sick of waiting, i now feel like they dont know what is causing them, if not the septate, what do i do? just try again now or wait for another pointless appoinment at the hospital? i feel like im just going to keep having misscarages and im never going to have a baby!
    can polycystic overies cause misscarage?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going to start by saying that I can partially relate with what you have been going through. I do not have a septate uterus, but I do have a septate vaginal canal. I have been pregnant once, and unfortunately I lost the baby as well. I'm so sorry for your losses and everything that you have had to go through. I've been doing some research on polycystic ovaries and below is what I found:

      "Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age. The name of the condition comes from the appearance of the ovaries in most, but not all, women with the disorder enlarged and containing numerous small cysts located along the outer edge of each ovary (polycystic appearance).

      Infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne and obesity can all occur in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Menstrual abnormality may signal the condition in adolescence, or PCOS may become apparent later following weight gain or difficulty becoming pregnant.

      The exact cause of polycystic ovary syndrome is unknown. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may have trouble becoming pregnant due to infrequent or lack of ovulation. Early diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome can help reduce the risk of long-term complications, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke."

      From reading what I have read I didn't see anything about the condition causing miscarriages, but it does state that it may cause difficulties becoming pregnant.
      From what I have learned in the past when I did research about why I had my miscarriage, there was most likely something wrong with the baby that he/she would not survive outside the womb.
      It's horrible to think about, but there could have been something wrong with your egg or the sperm that fertilized your egg.

      The one thing that made me feel better when I started the grieving process was remembering that just because I cannot hold my baby, doesn't mean I cannot love him/her. I like to think of my baby as my guardian angel, protecting myself and my husband while he's deployed in Afghanistan.

  30. QUESTION:
    Just diagnosed with PCOS?
    I went to the Dr. cause I was having irregular periods. While I was there he asked me how often I had a period (3-5/year) and then asked whether I had hair on my nipples. (I don't) He then told me that due to the fact that I don't have hair on my nipples that I have a very mild case of PCOS. However, I do have extra hair on my upper lip, chin, and under my belly button and he didn't even ask about this. He didn't really even tell me what PCOS was and what I know about it I have looked up online (which can be wrong) so I'm not sure if I know what Im talking about. Anywho, he put me on Aviane birth control and told me to come back in 3mos to check on B/C and have bloodwork done to be "actually diagnosed." While on this B/C I had some problems with it. I had sore breasts that I couldn't even wear a bra for the whole 3mos, a headache the WHOLE TIME, and I had nose bleeds. When I told the Dr. about the nose bleeds he said I was imagining it cause he had never heard of it. But it clearly reads in the drug info packet he gave me that that is a serious side effect of this stuff. When I went back he simply switched the B/C and didn't do any blood work. He acted like he didn't know what I was talking about when I asked if he was going to do any blood work. I also have read that hair loss can be caused by PCOS-I have bald spots ... he says that its not though. So, I guess I want to know if I need blood work done or not. Are there any alternatives to B/C? And can PCOS cause hair loss like that?

    • ANSWER:
      Okay first off, many doctors think that BC has a panacea effect (as in a cure-all) on PCOS. It does not. In fact, there are many extra risks in using some birth control types - like Yasmin/Osceola - with PCOS. In fact there is even an FDA warning going out, and I have joined a class action suit against it because of the dangers of that birthcontrol - and also if you had such a bad reaction... then yes you were correct in not taking it any longer. Often though, the first two months of a bc are unpleasant.
      Secondly - hair around the nipple is quite normal, even for women without PCOS. Your doctor clearly doesn't know what he's talking about on that. Some hair around the navel and upper lip is also normal for many women, but PCOS makes it much darker, and coarse, more easily visible at young ages.
      Yes, alopecia can be caused by PCOS. Your doctor is not treating you properly, and you should go to a different one. Also, stop taking any of the pills for PCOS he gave you - like the new BC.
      You should get bloodwork done.
      There are ways to help alleviate such severe PCOS, because if you're having bald spots, and such infrequent periods, there is no 'cure' for it. But you have to manage it, because you can get diabetes very easily, and also high blood pressure, be at risk for stroke and heart disease. Eat green leafy vegetables, take vitamins, and all that regular stuff. But make sure you take good iron, calcium and folic acid. All women need that, but with PCOS you REALLY need it.
      And lastly - ANY doctor who tells you are simply imagining a symptom - is full of shit (pardon my swearing please) and is not obeying the Hipocratic Oath. He is not treating you, he is not listening to your input, and that is putting you at risk and in harm's way - a direct violation of the Oath. He clearly hasn't done any actual research, and clearly has no ability to listen to what his patients say.

      For my PCOS, I am on a diabetes medication called gloucafauge (I probably spelled that wrong) that does have some side effects - while my body was getting used to it, I had some nausea and potty problems, but now that I'm used to it, it helps a lot. See, what PCOS is basically, are lots of microscopic cysts on your ovaries, that sort of throw everything out of whack. For some reason being on gloucafauge (even though I'm not diabetic, in fact I'm hypoglycemic so I have to adjust my caloric intake accordingly or wind up having some REAL problems), balances out everything for many women with PCOS. It's an older medication, but the application is good. In fact, it helps with fertility, period cycles, and cramps.
      My friend Arlene who was told she'd never be able to get pregnant, now has two kids.
      So, change of diet, doesn't have to be extreme, to include more vegies, less red meat if possible, foods with lots of antioxidants. Also, walking, and yoga - seems like it wouldn't do anything, but it does. If you need more info, or some suggestions for how to cope with it on a day to day basis, feel free to message me. I don't know everything, but dealing with PCOS is individual, and I may be able to point you to some resources that you could use.
      Ultimately - PLEASE get a different doctor, and speak up. Don't be afraid to, don't just let them tell you "Oh you're imagining this or that" because they're human, they're fallible too.

  31. QUESTION:
    anybody know about PCOS?
    Is it possible to have PCOS and still have regular periods?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you can. However, usually your periods are very heavy and can be more painful. Other symptoms of PCOS are carrying extra weight around your abdomen, having difficulty losing weight because your body may not use insulin effectively, a roundness at the top of your back,and darker skin either at the back of your neck or under arms. You may also have benign cysts on your ovaries that may occassional rupture, causing you quite a bit of pain. You may also have a more difficult time conceiving and have a higher risk of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes. While it sounds rather bleak, realize that not everyone has all of these symptoms, and because the medical worlds recognizes PCOS, the treatments get better all the time.

  32. QUESTION:
    does a hysterectomy shorten a lifespan of a woman.?
    my gyn told me that yesterday.he is doing a hysterectomy on me because of horrible bleeding and lots of clots and i have severe pain and also ovarian cysts.i really don't have any options because i can't take bcp's because of my severe migraines with aura's so that leaves me at higher risk of stroke if i was to take bcp's. i want a permanent fix not a temporary fix( bandaide ).i know if u are prone to heart disease u can have problems or breast cancer.i won't be loosing both of my ovaries just the one that is damaged.if i end up have to take something for hormones i have already looked at something natural with no chemicals in it that could cause cancer called Femal.

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think a hysterectomy shortens your lifespan unless you take the HRTs. I've had two very good friends die awhile after taking the HRTs with a stroke. Both families feel HRT contributed. My mother had her hysterectomy at 39 and she's now 71. Her mother (my grandmother) had a hysterectomy in her late 20's and lived to 74.

      I HIGHLY recommend you check out www.hystersisters.com. They helped me EXTREMELY with my questions and advice on hysterectomies. It's a support group and it's FREE.

      I wish I'd found the site before I had mine. A lot of my questions and concerns would have been answered with just looking at the responses on this website. But I stumbled on the site a few days after my hysterectomy and learned of various things I should do before the surgery, things I'm entitled to at the hospital (which the hospital doesn't tell you), questions to ask the doctor, etc. It's an awesome site for women.

      I hope it helps you, it has helped me and my family and friends

  33. QUESTION:
    what sort of treatments are available if i have PCOS and want to get pregnant?
    i had blood test and ultrasound with pelvic exam, my doctor told me im fertile but the cyst dont allow my eggs to get fertilize. they put me on birth control to help me heal my ovaries since they found scar tissue in both ovaries, and told me that in 6 months i can try to get pregnant. but i dont want to wait that long i been trying to get pregnant for 3 years. does anyone know of any information on treatments that can help me get pregnant within the next 4 months....... any info would be of great help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have pcos too!
      I have found a great website with very supportive ladies with pcos too!

      There is lots of treatments out there that can help you, Im trying to find an article that I found help ful.. Also there is lots of information you can look at.
      here is the url http://www.soulcysters.net/
      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome or PCOS the most common hormonal disorder affecting women. An estimated of 5- 10 percent of women of childbearing age and it is a leading cause of infertility. It is the most common endocrinopathy among reproductive age women.As many as30 percent of women have some characteristics of the syndrome.It s an unfortunately named syndrome, as people often think of large grapefruit-sized cysts when they hear the term polycystic ovaries . In the case of PCOS, the cysts are tiny. Using an ultrasound, they look like black dots on an ovary. These cysts are eggs that have failed to properly mature and release from the ovary.

      PCOS symptoms usually present themselves during puberty but may also begin in the early to mid 20s. Certain symptoms are life-long, others will cease at menopause.

      Syndrome means this is a condition that has a number of diagnostic symptoms with no simple hard and fast diagnostic test. Each woman presents with a different number of symptoms and together they make PCOS. It s rare that two women share exactly the same symptoms.

      The following is a list of some of the possible symptoms:

      Hirsuitism (excessive hair growth on the face, chest, abdomen, etc.) Hair loss (androgenic alopecia, in a classic "male baldness" pattern) Acne
      Polycystic ovaries (seen on ultrasound)
      Obesity
      Infertility or reduced fertility
      Irregular or absent menstrual periods
      In addition, women with PCOS appear to be at increased risk of developing the following health problems during their lives:

      Insulin resistance
      Diabetes
      Lipid abnormalities
      Cardiovascular disease (heart disease, heart attacks and stroke)
      Endometrial carcinoma (cancer)

      Although polycystic ovaries can be one of the symptoms, they aren't present in all sufferers, making the most common name of the syndrome confusing. In addition many women without PCOS have polycystic ovaries but none of the other symptoms and there for it is important to understand the difference between the syndrome and having only polycystic ovaries.

      PCOS is sometimes called "hyperandrogen anovulation syndrome" which describes its hormonal imbalance and associated problems with ovulation better. However the term PCOS or Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome has been used by the medical profession since the early 1930s and is almost too entrenched in medical literature to change to a more appropriate term.

      PCOS develops when the ovaries overproduce androgens male hormones, like testosterone. The overproduction of Androgen usually triggers overproduction of LH (lutenizing hormone), which is produced by the pituitary gland.

      Research suggests the cause of the overproduction of testosterone by the ovaries is due by a woman s inability to process insulin effectively. This is called Insulin Resistance or Hyperinsulinemia (both pre-diabetic conditions). When insulin levels in the blood are too high, the ovary reacts by producing more testosterone. This triggers a cascading effect of other conditions like excess hair growth, scalp hair loss and acne.

      The inability of the woman to process this excess insulin can also lead to obesity. But not all PCOS are obese even though in the past being excessively overweight was considered a diagnostic symptom. Research over the past 10 years has found that PCOS can affect women who are underweight and of normal weight. These so called "thin" sufferers can also have impaired insulin processing. Health Risks Associated with PCOS

      Even if your doctor suspects PCOS, you MUST get it confirmed or ruled out. Sufferers often don t realise they have an increased risk of developing a number of long term health risks.

      It is important to have your general health monitored regularly by a doctor (GP, Endocrinologist, Reproductive Endocrinologist or Ob/Gyn) who has experience treating women with PCOS. These check ups should continue post menopause even though many of the PCOS symptoms may lessen and/or disappear. Middle age is the time when many of the associated long term health risks may begin appearing.

      Infertility or sub fertility

      Many women discover they have PCOS after failing to fall pregnant. Until then, many PCOS women disregard their symptoms as troublesome and not worthy of treatment. Infertility or subfertility (reduced fertility) is a common problem for women with PCOS. The sub or infertility is generally due to the hormonal imbalances preventing regular ovulation. Ovulation may occur but it s generally infrequent and makes conception difficult. Ovulation inducing drugs such as Clomiphene, Metrodin and Pergonyl may be prescribed and used by doctors to help the body ovulate and achieve conception if the couple is unable to conceive within 12 months by themselves.

      Insulin Resistance/Type II Diabetes

      It s been suggested that 40% of PCOS sufferers will be Type 2 diabetic by the time they are 44 years of age. PCOS women have the power to prevent serious health complications, at an early age through exercise and diet. A PCOS sufferer s inability to process insulin worsens with age and by menopause, almost half of PCOS women are diagnosed Insulin Resistant or Type II Diabetic.

      It is VITAL sufferers take steps at a much younger age to prevent these serious health complications. Regular exercise (30 minutes worth, five times a week) and sticking to a low Glycemic Index diet can help control insulin levels and prevent them getting worse.

      Insulin sensitising drugs such as Metformin/Rezulin can also help.

      High Cholesterol Levels/Cardiovascular Disease
      High levels of Testosterone can cause high levels of LDL which is commonly known as bad cholesterol . It can also decrease your levels of HDL which is the good cholesterol . This imbalance can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease and your coronary risk ratio. Some US-based research has found that 40% of PCOS women will experience cardiovascular disease by their mid-forties. But, this study was done on a small group of Afro-American women who were extremely obese women, and therefore not reflective of the general population of PCOS women. There are a number of Australian studies currently underway to find out what the figures are for Australian women.

      Cancer of the Endometrium
      As women with PCOS have infrequent ovulation they therefore have infrequent menstruation. This irregular shedding of the uterus lining can increase the chances of uterine lining (Endometrium) producing abnormal and cancerous cells. A woman with PCOS needs to ensure that she sheds her lining at least every 3 months to reduce her risk of Endometrial cancer. Menstruation can be brought on by Provera or by taking birth control pills

  34. QUESTION:
    If a mans penis is too big and hes too rough, can a woman die?
    I'm serious, because I don't understand how a woman can die from rape alone so I just wonder. Ok not trying to offend, but can this happen??
    *I'm

    • ANSWER:
      it can cause hemorrhage and internal injures - yes a sex partner male or female can die

      i can't cite the article it is from an explicit site

      BY: TYOMI MORGAN -

      "In today s society, rough sex seems to be a trend that many have adopted. R&B crooners sing over sensual melodies about knocking walls down , rap legends rhyme about beating the p*ssy up and men go round for round in the bedroom like Mike Tyson in the PRIME of his career pounding away at a woman s vagina believing he is making her feel amazing. Fact of the matter is, for the average woman, all of that hard pounding doesn t deliver pleasure, but on the contrary, more pain with each long, hard stroke.

      I ve heard men call women weak for not being able to take the D , but what many men fail to realize is that (1) The average woman CAN NOT freak like a porn star (even some porn stars complain that it hurts from time to time) (2) the vagina can only take so much heavy friction before damage occurs (3) The vagina has an ending (4) when a woman flinches or says ouch during sex, she s SERIOUSLY feeling pain.

      The vagina leads to the cervix which then leads to the opening of the uterus within the pelvis, so when a man is drilling trying to reach the bottom of the vagina by taking long hard strokes, he must realize that THERE IS AN ENDING and there are sensitive organs that can become damaged if too much force is applied. Rough sex can damage these internal organs and can shift things out of place (i.e. tilting of the uterus) as well as cause internal ruptures that can lead to blood filled cysts on the ovaries or within the uterus. Twisted fallopian tubes, tearing of the vaginal walls and vaginal opening, bleeding and swelling can all also result from rough play."

  35. QUESTION:
    do i have fibroid?
    i am 28 and married. had 2 misscarriage.Since the last misscarriage(at 5 months last year)i always have stomach pain.My period turn upside down,waist pain and everytime ovulation my pain growing stronger.Im taking clomid for the last pregnancy.Pls help..

    • ANSWER:
      One of the other symptoms is severe bleeding during menstruation sometimes w/clotting. If it's as simple as this sometimes the doctor will just recommend the pill because the hormones in it will shrink the fibroids or in the worse cases D&C. Has your doctor checked you for this? Tell him of your fears and ask him if he can check this out for you just to allay your fear and if he refuses see another doctor. Could the clomid be giving you the problem? This is what I found on the drug:

      clomid
      Side Effects & Drug Interactions
      FONT SIZE
      A
      A
      A
      SIDE EFFECTS
      Clinical Trial Adverse Events. CLOMID, at recommended dosages, is generally well tolerated. Adverse reactions usually have been mild and transient and most have disappeared promptly after treatment has been discontinued. Adverse experiences reported in patients treated with clomiphene citrate during clinical studies are shown in Table 2.

      Table 2. Incidence of Adverse Events in Clinical Studies (Events Greater than 1%) (n = 8029*)

      Adverse Event %
      Ovarian Enlargement 13.6
      Vasomotor Flushes 10.4
      Abdominal-Pelvic Discomfort/Distention/Bloating 5.5
      Nausea and Vomiting 2.2
      Breast Discomfort 2.1
      Visual Symptoms 1.5
      Blurred vision, lights, floaters, waves, unspecified visual complaints,
      photophobia, diplopia, scotomata, phosphenes
      Headache 1.3
      Abnormal Uterine Bleeding 1.3
      Intermenstrual spotting, menorrhagia
      *Includes 498 patients whose reports may have been duplicated in the event totals and could not be distinguished as such. Also, excludes 47 patients who did not report symptom data.
      The following adverse events have been reported in fewer than 1% of patients in clinical trials: Acute abdomen, appetite increase, constipation, dermatitis or rash, depression, diarrhea, dizziness, fatigue, hair loss/dry hair, increased urinary frequency/volume, insomnia, light-headedness, nervous tension, vaginal dryness, vertigo, weight gain/loss. Patients on prolonged CLOMID therapy may show elevated serum levels of desmosterol. This is most likely due to a direct interference with cholesterol synthesis. However, the serum sterols in patients receiving the recommended dose of CLOMID are not significantly altered. Ovarian cancer has been infrequently reported in patients who have received fertility drugs. Infertility is a primary risk factor for ovarian cancer; however, epidemiology data suggest that prolonged use of clomiphene may increase the risk of a borderline or invasive ovarian tumor.

      Postmarketing Adverse Events

      The following adverse experiences were reported spontaneously with CLOMID. The cause and effect relationship of the listed events to the administration of CLOMID is not known.

      Dermatologic: Acne, allergic reaction, erythema, erythema multiforme, erythema nodosum, hypertrichosis, pruritus

      Central Nervous System: Migraine headache, paresthesia, seizure, stroke, syncope

      Psychiatric: Anxiety, irritability, mood changes, psychosis

      Visual Disorders: Abnormal accommodation, cataract, eye pain, macular edema, optic neuritis, photopsia, posterior vitreous detachment, retinal hemorrhage, retinal thrombosis, retinal vascular spasm, temporary loss of vision

      Cardiovascular: Arrhythmia, chest pain, edema, hypertension, palpitation, phlebitis, pulmonary embolism, shortness of breath, tachycardia, thrombophlebitis

      Musculoskeletal: Arthralgia, back pain, myalgia

      Hepatic: Transaminases increased, hepatitis

      Neoplasms: Liver (hepatic hemangiosarcoma, liver cell adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma); breast (fibrocystic disease, breast carcinoma); endometrium (endometrial carcinoma); nervous system (astrocytoma, pituitary tumor, prolactinoma, neurofibromatosis, glioblastoma multiforme, brain abcess); ovary (luteoma of pregnancy, dermoid cyst of the ovary, ovarian carcinoma); trophoblastic (hydatiform mole, choriocarcinoma); miscellaneous (melanoma, myeloma, perianal cysts, renal cell carcinoma, Hodgkin s lymphoma, tongue carcinoma, bladder carcinoma); and neoplasms of offspring (neuroectodermal tumor, thyroid tumor, hepatoblastoma, lymphocytic leukemia)

      Genitourinary: Endometriosis, ovarian cyst (ovarian enlargement or cysts could, as such, be complicated by adnexal torsion), ovarian hemorrhage, tubal pregnancy, uterine hemorrhage

      Body as a Whole: Fever, tinnitus, weakness Other: Leukocytosis, thyroid disorder Fetal/Neonatal Anomalies. The following fetal abnormalities have also been reported during postmarketing surveillance: delayed development; abnormal bone development including skeletal malformations of the skull, face, nasal passages, jaw, hand, limb (ectromelia including amelia, hemimelia, and phocomelia), foot, and joints; tissue malformations including imperforate anus, tracheoesophageal fistula, diaphragmatic hernia, renal agenesis and dysgenesis, and malformations of the eye and lens (cataract), ear, lung, heart (ventricular septal defect and tetralogy of Fallot), and genitalia; as well as dwarfism, deafness, mental retardation, chromosomal disorders, and neural tube defects (including anencephaly).

      Drug Abuse And Dependence

      Tolerance, abuse, or dependence with CLOMID has not been reported.

      Hope this helps and feel better. God Bless you Sweetie and I pray for your next pregnancy.

  36. QUESTION:
    trying to concieve for last 8 months?
    i hav also the problem of execcive bleeding during periods.according to my sonography report there is polysyctic ovarian diecease.my gaynec prescribed me tablet "duphaston".

    • ANSWER:
      I'm unable to define polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) exactly, because there is no universally agreed definition. In the UK up to one third of women have polycystic ovaries (as defined by ultrasound examination), and around one-third of these have PCOS as defined by abnormal blood tests, or additional physical characteristics such as excess body and facial hair and obesity.

      PCOS is therefore a gynaecological condition in which the ovaries produce a number of cysts that can lead to problems with hormonal imbalances and ovulation, with absent or irregular periods. The exact cause is unknown, although some women are thought to be genetically predisposed to developing PCOS.

      The treatment often recommended for PCOS is the contraceptive pill, to regulate the periods and to protect against the effects of higher than normal levels of oestrogen that women with this disease can experience.

      Prolonged high levels of oestrogen can be responsible for the development of cancer of the endometrium (lining of the womb). Some women with PCOS have been found to show an increased risk of developing diabetes, high cholesterol levels and stroke.

      However, despite being more likely than other women of the same age to have risk factors for heart disease, PCOS sufferers do not seem to develop any more symptoms than average.

      Weight reduction is the first line of treatment to induce ovulation in those patients with PCOS who are encountering problems conceiving. If this is unsuccessful, the couple will be referred to a specialist fertility unit for treatment with a drug called clomiphene (Clomid).

      Most women ovulate in response to treatment, with between 50 to 60 per cent conceiving following up to six cycles of treatment. Up to 12 cycles may be offered before proceeding to other treatments.

      Good luck

  37. QUESTION:
    question about ct scans. please answer?
    Okay I had two ct scans last month one because I fell and one for a sinus infection. They both came back clear. I just got this random fear of a brain anerysum after watching Dr.g medical examiner. Would the ct scan have shown if I had an unruptured aneurysm? Should ijust let go of this fear? The girl that died on her show was a long time drug addict and older. I'm 21 and not a drug addict

    • ANSWER:
      CT Scans are quite accurate for visualizations of any growths, nasal polyps, kidney stones, brain aneurysms, tumor ,etc.

      CT Scans, or CAT Scan ( computerized axial tomography scan) is an x-ray procedure that combines many x-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate cross-sectional views and, if needed, three-dimensional images of the internal organs and structures of the body. A CT scan is used to define normal and abnormal structures in the body and/or assist in procedures by helping to accurately guide the placement of instruments or treatments.

      CT scans are performed to analyze the internal structures of various parts of the body. This includes the head, where traumatic injuries, (such as blood clots or skull fractures), tumors, and infections can be identified. In the spine, the bony structure of the vertebrae can be accurately defined, as can the anatomy of the intervertebral discs and spinal cord. In fact, CT scan methods can be used to accurately measure the density of bone in evaluating osteoporosis

      CT scans are also used in the chest to identify tumors, cysts, or infections that may be suspected on a chest x-ray. CT scans of the abdomen are extremely helpful in defining body organ anatomy, including visualizing the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen, aorta, kidneys, uterus, and ovaries. CT scans in this area are used to verify the presence or absence of tumors, infection, abnormal anatomy, or changes of the body from trauma.

      CT Scan At A Glance

      CT scanning adds x-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate cross-sectional views of anatomy.

      CT scanning can identify normal and abnormal structures and be used to guide procedures.

      CT scanning is painless.

      Iodine-containing contrast material is sometimes used in CT scanning. Patients with a history of allergy to iodine or contrast materials should notify their physicians and radiology staff.

      The brain gets its blood supply from arteries known as the Circle of Willis. It is located at the base of the brain and is a loop of arteries that join in a circle then send branches out to all parts of the brain. These arteries deliver nutrition (glucose and oxygen) to the brain cells.

      The junctions where these arteries come together can form weak spots. These weak spots can balloon out and fill with blood, creating the outpouchings of blood vessels known as aneurysms. These sac-like areas may leak or rupture spilling blood into surrounding tissues. While the prevailing thought has been that aneurysms are congenital (meaning that people are born with them), it is now thought that they are due to microscopic damage to the artery walls caused by abnormal flow at the junction points where the arteries come together.

      There are other rare causes of aneurysms. Mycotic aneurysms are cause by infections of the artery wall. Tumors and trauma can also cause aneurysms to form. Drug abuse, especially cocaine, can cause the artery walls to inflame and weaken

      Brain aneurysms (aneurysms within arteries in the brain) are a common occurrence. At autopsy, incidental asymptomatic aneurysms are found in more than 1% of people. Most aneurysms remain small and never become an issue or are diagnosed.

      Some, however, may gradually get larger and exert pressure on surrounding brain tissue and nerves and may be diagnosed because of facial symptoms such as:

      headache,
      numbness, or weakness of one side of the face,
      a dilated pupil, or
      change in vision.

      The greater concern is a brain aneurysm that leaks or ruptures, and potentially causes stroke or death. Bleeding leaks into one of the membranes that covers the brain and spinal canal and is known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage (sub= beneath + arachnoid=one of the brain coverings + hemorrhage=bleeding

      I enjoy watching Dr. G. She does extensive autopsy for differential diagnoses as to the cause of death. She is relentless.Her observations and use of forensic science is quite interesting. Her cases are all real; not made up like in CSI.
      Both she and her husband are pathologists.

      You should not worry. If you had a brain aneurysm; it should have been easily identifiable in the CT Scan. Besides, you have to have the symptoms as stated above.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/brain_aneurysm/article.htm

  38. QUESTION:
    How long do cats stay on heat for?
    How long do cats stay on heat for? My cat is pregnant and I dont know how far gone she is!

    • ANSWER:
      HOW OFTEN DOES A FEMALE CAT COME INTO HEAT?
      In the world of breeding cats, the female cat is usually referred to as a "queen". Her heat cycle is often called the "estrus cycle" or simply "estrus". The length of time of the estrus, and the frequency of the estrus cycles depends upon many factors, such as geographic and environmental factors, (temperature and the number of daylight hours), her age and overall health, and her genetic background. Once a queen goes into heat or estrus, she may stay in heat for several days, to 2-3 weeks. Some queens, once they are sexually mature and enter estrus, do not come out of heat unless and until they are either bred to a full male cat, or spayed. The majority of queens will cycle in and out of estrus during the prime breeding season (roughly December through August), returning back into heat approximately every other week.

      CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF HEAT?
      Each queen will exhibit different signs of being in heat or estrus. Unlike dogs, cats rarely show signs of vaginal bleeding during estrus. However, their behavior changes greatly, with the majority of queens becoming quite vocal and loud, and showing increased signs of affection. They may roll around on the floor or plop down right in front of you as you are walking; they constantly want to be with you and be stroked, and when you pet them on their back, they will raise their rear end up high and knead with their front paws.

      CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      HOW DO I KNOW WHEN I SHOULD BREED MY FEMALE?
      Many breeders as well as veterinarians and animal experts have different opinions on this. It is always preferable to have your queen be fully grown and mature herself, both physically and emotionally, before attempting to have her become a mother. It is usually recommended to wait until your queen is a year old, and has had 2 heat cycles, before breeding her. However, that said, there are cases when it may not be in her best interest, medically, to wait that long before breeding her. Factors such as breed type, the number and intensity of heat cycles, can all play an important role in this critical decision. Breeders of pedigreed cats walk a fine line between doing what they feel is best for their queens, and actually inadvertently causing problems for the queen by interfering too much with what would be the normal course of events in nature. For some queens, if they have had 3 or more heat cycles without having been bred, especially if these heat cycles are extremely intense, they may become more likely to develop a condition known as "cystic ovaries". Once cysts develop on the ovaries, this will usually render these queens sterile and incapable of becoming pregnant. Occasionally, a feline fertility veterinarian specialist may be able to surgically break down and/or remove the cysts, but obviously this procedure carries other risks and may lead to scar tissue on the affected ovary. Infertile queens should be spayed and make WONDERFUL pets.

      CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      2 Versions of Nest Boxes: Left, the Simple Cardboard Box;
      Right, the Brand New Kitty Cave from HDW Enterprises & Me-Ow-Trageous , Inc.!!

      HOW LONG SHOULD I LET THE QUEEN BE IN WITH THE MALE?
      Female cats are known as "induced ovulators", which means that the act of breeding itself is what stimulates her ovaries to release eggs. Most female cats require 3-4 breedings within a 24 hour period for ovulation to occur. Again, there are a variety of factors that can play a role here, and the breeder needs to be not only looking out for the well-being of the queen, but also for the overall health and well-being of the male cat ("stud" or "tom"). If the queen and stud are happy together, there is no urgent need to separate them after they have bred. We have left a happy couple together right up until a week prior to the queen's delivery date, several times! Once the queen is pregnant, she will go out of heat, and the male will stop breeding her. Some breeders leave the queen in with the stud for 1-2 days, while others prefer to be a bit more certain that the queen is pregnant, and give them 4 days together.

      CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      WHAT ARE THE FIRST SIGNS OF PREGNANCY?
      Pregnancy in cats , called the "gestation period", generally ranges from 60 to 67 days, with the average being 63 days. Most of our queens deliver between days 64 and 66. It is very important to mark on your calendar the days you have actually witnessed your queen being bred by the stud cat, as this will be the primary way for you to determine when she is due to deliver her kittens. At about 3 weeks after breeding, a pregnant queen will show some physical symptoms of pregnancy, such as enlarged and rose-colored nipples, and a big increase in appetite and overall interest in food. Your veterinarian should be able to feel her abdomen carefully (called "palpating") and detect any small fetuses. Some queens will have a few episodes of vomiting - the feline version of "morning sickness". Most pregnant queens will become very affectionate, want to be close to you, and thrive on receiving loving reassurances from you that all will be well!!

      CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      WHAT SHOULD I FEED MY PREGNANT QUEEN?
      You should expect that your queen will require and eat quite a bit more during pregnancy and during nursing than she did previously. One way to be sure she is getting enough nutrition is to increase the frequency of her feedings also. It takes an incredible amount of nutrition to create and then to nurse kittens, and if the queen is not taking in enough nutrition, nutrients will be pulled from her own tissues and put her own health at risk. A few days before her due date, you may want to start adding some calcium to her wet food. Calcium supplements for dogs and cats are available at most large pet and feed stores.

      Pregnant cats do need a bit of special care. Be sure to keep her indoors and in a clean, safe environment at all times. Make certain that her litter box is always extremely clean to avoid the spread of infection; and you may want to switch to a 'shorter' litter box as her belly starts to grow. Be sure she has comfortable, soft places to rest, that she gets plenty of rest, and do everything you can to try to keep the atmosphere around her as stress-free as possible.

  39. QUESTION:
    what age can cats have kittens?
    I just got two kittens about 2 1/2 months ago.
    there not realated.
    I know there to young to have kittens now but in the future
    how old do they have to be?
    and do they need anything different while theyre pregnant

    • ANSWER:
      i got this from this website...http://www.hdw-inc.com/pregnancy.htm
      hope this helps lol sorry its a lot of info...but pretty much a female cat is able to be bred when she comes into heat.

      HOW OFTEN DOES A FEMALE CAT COME INTO HEAT?
      In the world of breeding cats, the female cat is usually referred to as a "queen". The queen's heat cycle is often called the "estrus cycle" or simply "estrus". The length of time of the estrus, and the frequency of the estrus cycles depends upon many factors, such as geographic and environmental factors, (temperature and the number of daylight hours), her age and overall health, and her genetic background. Once a queen goes into heat or estrus, she may stay in heat for several days, to 2-3 weeks. Some queens, once they are sexually mature and enter estrus, do not come out of heat unless and until they are either bred to a full male cat, or spayed. The majority of queens will cycle in and out of estrus during the prime breeding season (roughly December through August), returning back into heat approximately every other week.

      I love Foothill Felines!CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      Look Here! WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF HEAT? Look Here!

      Each queen will exhibit different signs of being in heat or estrus. Unlike dogs, cats rarely show signs of vaginal bleeding during estrus. However, their behavior changes greatly, with the majority of queens becoming quite vocal and loud, and showing increased signs of affection. They may roll around on the floor or plop down right in front of you as you are walking; they constantly want to be with you and be stroked, and when you pet them on their back, they will raise their rear end up high and knead with their front paws.

      I love Foothill Felines!CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      Cardboard boxes make great, simple nest boxes for Mama Kitty!! The brand new prototype for an elegant nest box, the Kitty Cave!!

      2 versions of nest boxes: left, the simple cardboard box;
      right, a carpeted piece of cat furniture

      Look Here! HOW DO I KNOW WHEN I SHOULD BREED MY FEMALE? Look Here!

      There are a wide variety of opinions by breeders, veterinarians and animal experts on this. It is always preferable to have your queen be fully grown and mature herself, both physically and emotionally, before attempting to have her become a mother. It is usually recommended to wait until your queen is a year old, and has had 2 heat cycles, before breeding her. However, that said, there are cases when it may not be in her best interest, medically, to wait that long before breeding her. Factors such as breed type, the number and intensity of heat cycles, can all play an important role in this critical decision. Breeders of pedigreed cats walk a fine line between doing what they feel is best for their queens, and actually inadvertently causing problems for the queen by interfering too much with what would be the normal course of events in nature. For some queens, if they have had 3 or more heat cycles without having been bred, especially if these heat cycles are extremely intense, they may become more likely to develop a condition known as "cystic ovaries". Once cysts develop on the ovaries, this will usually render these queens sterile and incapable of becoming pregnant. Occasionally, a feline fertility veterinarian specialist may be able to surgically break down and/or remove the cysts, but obviously this procedure carries other risks and may lead to scar tissue on the affected ovary. Infertile queens should be spayed and make WONDERFUL pets.

      I love Foothill Felines!CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      Look Here! HOW LONG SHOULD I LET THE QUEEN BE IN WITH THE MALE? Look Here!

      Female cats are "induced ovulators", which means that the act of breeding itself is what stimulates her ovaries to release eggs. This is an extremely effective method for conception to take place!! Most female cats require 3-4 breedings within a 24 hour period for ovulation to occur. Again, there are a variety of factors that can play a role here, and the breeder needs to be not only looking out for the well-being of the queen, but also for the overall health and well-being of the male cat ("stud" or "tom"). If the queen and stud are happy together, there is no urgent need to separate them after they have bred. We have left a happy couple together right up until a week prior to the queen's delivery date, several times! Once the queen is pregnant, she will go out of heat, and the male will stop breeding her. Some breeders leave the queen in with the stud for 1-2 days, while others prefer to be a bit more certain that the queen is pregnant, and give them 4 days together. It's important to realize that the shorter the timeframe the queen is in with the tom, the more accurately you'll be able to predict when she is due to deliver her kittens. This becomes especially important if there is a consideration of having a c-section performed.

      I love Foothill Felines!CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      Look Here! WHAT ARE THE FIRST SIGNS OF PREGNANCY? Look Here!

      Pregnancy in cats , called the "gestation period", generally ranges from 60 to 69 days, with the average being 63-64 days. Most of our queens deliver between days 64 and 66. It's very important to mark on your calendar the days you have actually witnessed your queen being bred by the stud cat, as this will be the primary way for you to determine when she is due to deliver her kittens. At about 3 weeks after breeding, a pregnant queen will show some physical symptoms of pregnancy, such as enlarged and rose-colored nipples, and a big increase in appetite and overall interest in food. Your veterinarian should be able to feel her abdomen carefully (called "palpating") and detect any small fetuses. Some queens will have a few episodes of vomiting - the feline version of "morning sickness". Most pregnant queens will become very affectionate, want to be close to you, and thrive on receiving loving reassurances from you that all will be well!!

      I love Foothill Felines!CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      Vida Mia and her gorgeous marble Bengal son!!

      Vida Mia's stunning brown marble Bengal son.

      Look Here! WHAT SHOULD I FEED MY PREGNANT QUEEN? Look Here!

      You should expect that your queen will require and eat quite a bit more food during pregnancy and while she is nursing than she did previously. One way to be sure she is getting enough nutrition is to increase the frequency of her feedings also. It takes an incredible amount of nutrition to create and then to nurse kittens, and if the queen is not taking in enough nutrition, nutrients will be pulled from her own tissues and put her own health at risk. A few days before her due date, you may want to start adding some calcium to her wet food. Calcium supplements for dogs and cats are available at most large pet and feed stores.

      Pregnant cats do need special care. Be sure to keep your pregnant queen indoors and in a clean, safe environment at all times. Make certain that her litter box is always extremely clean to avoid the spread of infection; and you may want to switch to a 'shorter' litter box as her belly starts to grow. Be sure she has comfortable, soft places to rest, that she gets plenty of rest, and do everything you can to try to keep the atmosphere around her as stress-free as possible.

      I love Foothill Felines!CLICK ON KITTY to Return to Top of Page!

      Look Here! PREPARING FOR KITTENS Look Here!

      During the last couple of weeks of pregnancy, and sometimes earlier, the expectant feline mother will usually begin to look for a secure, safe place to have her litter. This is definitely the time for you to introduce her to her "nest box" and birthing area if you haven't done so already. If your queen does not take to the area you have selected for her to have her kittens, you may need to confine her within a large cage or pen, or small bathroom, walk-in closet, etc. Many queens actually prefer this confinement, so they can start to settle down, and scratch around in her nest box. The area you select for her should be quiet and secluded, away from the hustle and bustle of activity, and certainly away from the competition and social stresses from being in close proximity to other animals.

      The nest box should be large enough for your queen to move and turn around in, and stand up completely, but not so large that it doesn't seem like a private, cave-like, and safe retreat. Cats are known for their love of curling up in small spaces. Cardboard boxes are often used and make great nest boxes. Be sure the front is at least 8-9" high, to keep the kittens in, yet allow your queen to come and go. Do not use any plastic tubs or boxes for your nest boxes, as there have been reports about lost litters due to the chemicals in the plastics. Place several layers of soft clean, absorbent towels inside the nest box, and let your queen dig around and make her nest in them. Once the kittens have been born, it is then fairly easy to peel back and remove the upper, soiled layers of towels with minimal interruption to the mother and her newborn kittens.

      Make sure you have on hand (all in one place that is easy for you to get to when your queen suddenly starts going into labor): 8 to 10 old, soft clean wash cloths; heating pad with cover; small carrier or box which opens from the top; white (colorless) iodine and/or alcohol prep pads; small hemostat; unused dental floss or clean sewing thread; small medical clamp; extra large soft towels for changing the bedding in the nest box; record book and pen; portable phone and emergency veterinary phone numbers; small scale which measures weight in small increments (postage scale, etc.); small baby bulb aspirator; flashlight with working batteries; Dopram-V (doxapram hydrochloride)*, and Oxytocin *. (* ask your vet about the last two). And, be sure to read our article on Breeding Cats, Part II: LABOR & DELIVERY.

  40. QUESTION:
    I think birth control isn't natural for your body, but yet my Dr. says i must take it to cure endrotremisiosis
    but i feel wierd takeing it, even though it is not for a long period of time. I need to know some pro's and con's for birth control other then the non-pregnancy.

    • ANSWER:
      If I were you, I'd get another opinion from another dr. I was diagnosed and treated for endometriosis during a laparoscopy. Did your dr. do a lap to see if you had endo and if he did why didn't he laser it out? If no lap was done I'd really get to a fertility specialist or other gyn who can help you with your options and maybe help laser it out if it wasn't done before.

      During my lap the dr. basically lasered all the endometriosis out. I was told that I shouldn't wait more than 2 years from the diagnosis to try getting pregnant. I also stayed on the pill after the diagnosis of endo but that's because I needed it for contraception. I ended up going off the pill because it caused my gallbladder to have complications. Plus if I wanted to become pregnant, I just used other methods before trying to conceive. I don't know of any research that says the pill will cure endometriosis but I know it can be lasered out like it was with me.
      Pros- can make your periods less painful and not last as long
      prevents pregnancy
      can help prevent certain health issues
      Cons- can cause complications
      has a possiblitly of stroke if you have high blood pressure or smoke while on the pill
      can make you gain unwanted weight.
      some can make you sick and vomit due to the hormones.
      Good luck to you and I hope that you get this taken care of before it causes you to not be able to have kids if you want any. Try doing some research about endo on the net to see about it being lasered out. Here is one link about someone else's story and possible things to do about endo.
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070517053029AA3c34c

      In case you can't get to the link, I am pasting what zoodles said as options to help get rid of endo or keep it away if possible.

      "Treatment Options

      Although there is no cure for endometriosis, a variety of treatment options exist. Goals may include: relieving/reducing pain symptoms, shrinking or slowing endometrial growths, preserving or restoring fertility, and preventing/delaying recurrence of the disease.

      PAIN MEDICATION: Over-the-counter pain relievers may include aspirin and acetaminophen, as well prostaglandin inhibitors such as ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, indomethecin, and tolfenamic acid. In some cases, prescription drugs may be required.

      HORMONAL THERAPY: Hormonal treatment aims to stop ovulation for as long as possible and may include: oral contraceptives, progesterone drugs, a testosterone derivative (danazol), and GnRH agonists (gonadotropin releasing hormone drugs). Side effects may be a problem for some women.

      SURGERY: Conservative surgery seeks to remove or destroy the growths, relieve pain, and may allow pregnancy to occur in some cases. Conservative surgery can involve laparoscopy (outpatient surgery in which the surgeon can view the inside of the abdomen through a tiny lighted tube that is inserted through one or more tiny abdominal incisions. Also referred to as "belly-button" surgery.) or laparotomy (more extensive procedure, full incision, longer recovery period). Hormonal therapy may be prescribed along with conservative surgery. Radical surgery, which may be necessary in severe cases, involves hysterectomy, removal of all growths, and removal of ovaries.

      ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT: Complementary treatment options may include traditional Chinese medicine, nutritional approaches, homeopathy, allergy management, and immune therapy. To learn more about alternative therapies, see: The Endometriosis Sourcebook, Overcoming Endometriosis, and EA newsletters Vol. 17, nos. 2, 3, 5-6."

      I had mine lasered away in 2000 and then went on the pill. It's kept mine at bay for years, and I had Stage 4, loads of adhesions, cysts on my ovaries, etc. Make sure you find a really good doctor/surgeon who has a lot of experience with lasering away endo. My first doctor was useless. When he saw the extent of my endo he said it was too much to deal with and didn't laser it all away. My second doctor was so much better--he lasered away all he possibly could, leaving only a little that was causing my ovary to adhere to my bowel because he was afraid of puncturing my bowel if he attempted to remove it.

      I urge you to check out the Endometriosis Association, too. They have lots of good information and support: www.endometriosisassn.org. Best of luck to you!
      1 year ago
      Source(s):
      personal experience and www.endometriosisassn.org"

  41. QUESTION:
    Haven't had a period for 9 months?
    I haven't had a period for 9 - 10 months. I am not pregnant. I have no idea why this is and can't take a birth control that will help make them regular due to I was hospitalize once with stroke like symtoms and the doctors told me it could be from what I was on to help me before. I do have stresses and I don't know if that's what preventing my period. Or if it's a more serious issue like a cyst on my ovaries.

    • ANSWER:
      why have you waited 9 - 10 months to find out why you didn't have a period?

      you should call your doctor and find out why.. it isn't always hormones that prevent a period.

      Anorexia Nervosa
      Simple Weight Loss
      Anxiety Reactions
      Marijuana Use
      Medications -- tricyclic antidepressants and phenothiazines

      you could have ..

      Polycystic Ovarian Disease

      Simmond's disease--when the pituitary fails for without any particular cause (idiopathic).

      Sheehan's syndrome--when the pituitary is damaged from massive bleeding caused by stresses of childbirth.

      Microadenomas--tumors that interfere with the function of the pituitary

      so as you can see there are a lot of different things that might be going on.

      please see your doctor...

      good luck

  42. QUESTION:
    My friend says she keeps fainting and her hair is falling out?
    I think it may be stress. I told her that she should go see a doctor. She says she will. But does anyone know what may be the problem. She is 17 by the way
    I dont think she has an eating disorder. she is definetly not anorexic or bulemic.

    • ANSWER:
      heat, heart problems, meds, stress, hypothyroidism,
      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)
      does she have any mood swings?

      Early symptoms of PCOS include:

      * Few or no menstrualAbnormal menstrual periods
      Breast - premenstrual tenderness and swelling
      Depression and the menstrual cycle
      Menstrual cramp relief
      Menstrual periods - heavy, prolonged, or irregular
      Painful menstrual periods
      Premenstrual bloating
      Premenstrual dysphoric disorder
      Premenstrual syndrome
      Relief of menstrual cramps
      Vaginal bleeding between periods periods.

      * Heavy, irregular vaginalAnterior vaginal wall repair
      Causes of vaginal itching
      Culture - endocervix
      Hydrocele
      Hysterectomy
      Transvaginal ultrasound
      Vaginal bleeding between periods
      Vaginal cysts
      Vaginal discharge bleedingBleeding
      Bleeding between periods
      Bleeding disorders
      Bleeding gums
      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (dub)
      Ear discharge
      Gastrointestinal bleeding
      Hemorrhagic stroke
      Nosebleed

      * HairHair loss
      Hair transplant
      Folliculitis, decalvans on the scalp
      Head louse infestation - scalp
      Ringworm of the scalp
      Tinea capitis
      Wood's lamp test - of the scalp and hairHair loss
      Hair transplant
      Male pattern baldness growth (hirsutism) on the faceFace pain, chestAcne, cystic on the chest
      Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray
      Bronchial cancer - chest x-ray
      Chest mri
      Chest pain
      Chest tomogram
      Chest tube insertion
      Chest tube insertion - series, backBack pain - low
      Back strain treatment, stomachAbdominal pain
      Abdominal pain diagnosis
      Esophagus and stomach anatomy
      Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy
      Gastric cancer
      Gastric suction
      Gastric ulcer
      Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach
      Nausea and vomiting
      Roux-en-y stomach surgery for weight loss
      Stomach, thumbs, or toes. More than 70% of women with PCOS complain of these hairHair loss
      Hair transplant

      * AcneAcne
      Acne - close-up of pustular lesions
      Acne on the back
      Acne, cystic on the chest
      Acne, cystic on the face
      Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne and oily skinActinic keratosis
      Aging changes in skin
      Allergy skin prick or scratch test
      Allergy testing
      Basal cell carcinoma
      Birthmarks - red
      Cellulitis
      Circumcision
      Cutaneous skin tags
      Dry skin
      Fair skin cancer risks, caused by high androgen levels.

      * DepressionAdolescent depression
      Bipolar disorder
      Depression
      Depression - resources
      Depression among the elderly
      Depression and heart disease
      Depression and insomnia
      Depression and the menstrual cycle
      Depression in children or mood swings. Hormonal changes are a known cause of emotional symptoms.

      http://www.webmd.com/hw/womens_conditions/tw9106.asp

  43. QUESTION:
    I don't really understand why I have so many problems with my lady parts. What do you think is wrong?
    Here are my symptoms:

    1. Irregular periods or non at all...
    2. Some acne when I get stressed or I'm about to start..
    3. I am over weight... And I don't understand why I eat healthy and exercise all the time and yet I'm still heavy...
    4. I have a little bit of excess hair on my body... But not much...
    5. Really high blood pressure and I'm really moody all the time... I do have bipolar supposedly but some how I think it may be the fact that my hormones are off or something... I dunno I'm lost..
    6. I can't get pregnant I have been having sex with the same guy for more than 6 years and don't have an STD nor does he and yet I still have a bunch of problems... Please help and no stupid answers... I have been to a bunch of doctors and they all tell me the same and that is that It is normal to miss a period or two but I missed 15 in a row that isn't normal I think those doctors a stupid or something... Please help...
    I have had my period since i was 9 it should be a least alittle normal... Right? I do watch my Blood pressure levels and my thyrods are fine had them check a million times because thats what they all thought at first...

    • ANSWER:
      Ok. first of all going 15 months without a period could mean that you are not ovulating or if you are then maybe your hormones could be causing you to miss them cause women who've had their tubes tied or have a hysterectomy and keep their ovaries can still ovulate but the egg disinigrates. It could also be PCOS. I'm not sure why you keep missing your periods. If you haven't been seeing an OBGYN then see one and think about seeing a fertility specialist or even an endocrinologist or all three but you should get that blood pressure under control and try to see what is causing you stress. The easiest years to get pregnant are before a woman reaches the age of 30 so I've been told and have read. Women can be in their 30's (although it's not common) to be in menopause but I think that you may want to see about your thyroid as that can cause some of your problems.

      As for the acne and stress that could be PMS and most women get it. I have roseacea (adult acnea with rendness on my cheeks, chin, and nose). You should see a dr. (preferably an internest or even a cardiologist) if you have any heart murmurs or problems like mitral valve (I didn't get diagnosed till I was about 26 with a heart murmur) a your high blood pressure.

      I first thought of PCOS but anyone can have excess hair. Maybe your symptoms point to this. I'd see a fertility specialist. If it takes longer than a year for a woman to get pregnant then you should have some tests done but first have your partner tested if you are trying to have a baby with him. Usually one gets twelve shots at becoming pregnant every year. You may want to think about getting a basal body temperature thermometer.

      As far as the excess body hair since it's not a lot that could be normal. I don't have PCOS but I have facial hair sometimes and I've had a history of ovarian cysts after my hysterectomy.

      As far as the really high blood pressure you need to see you primary dr. You need to get this under control before you have a stroke. I don't know why your dr. hasn't put you on blood pressure medication. If you've only seen one type of dr. for all of this you should be seeing an internal medicine dr. for the blood pressure, OBGYN or fertility specialist for the abscence of periods and having a hard time getting pregnant (but get your blood pressure under control first). Hormones usually don't cause high blood pressure and it's usually stress that can cause it.

      If you want to know if you're ovulating than you can buy one of those ovulation tests the ones that sell for over 0 so you don't waste money on the cheaper ones that are just one time use and then you throw them away. Some of them let you test for up to 20 days but obviously you want to find out why your not having your cycles at all for fifteen months.

      As for the bipolar issues you are hopefully seeing a psychiatrist for that and he/she should be the one giving you the right medication for it. My mom took lithium but she would go off of it and maybe there are better medications for it than lithium. So basically you need four types of dr's for you. You said you've seen a bunch of dr's and they all say it's normal to miss a period or two but did you actually say you missed 15? That's not a period or two. If you have said 15 and ask why you haven't been able to get pregnant and they haven't done anything about it, it's time to move on. Get recommendations to see certain dr's because a lot of them may not be good enough. I always resort to getting recommendations from my gyn dr. cause every dr. I've seen that he has sent me to have been great. I hope that this will help some. I'm not a dr. but I know that what you are experiencing should be under a dr's care anyway since you have extremely high blood pressure (what's the range you get)? If the diastolic-lower number is 90 or higher usually then that's not good. A person can have a B.P. of 130/100 and that's classified as it being high cause of the lower number. If the systolic-upper number is above 140 (I think that's the right number but I could be wrong) than that's something that needs to be under better control. Here's a link with the numbers. http://www.caduet.com/tracking-your-numbers.asp

      Also see an endocrinologist about your weight as you could have thyroid problems. An OBGYN dr. sometimes can feel the thyroid to see if it's big by you swallowing as they feel your throat.

      Good luck. You may also want to call a hospital and ask the nurses on the maternity floor if they can recommend a good obgyn dr. or fertility specialist. You can also ask friends who they recommend. Before you go by a fertility monitor or see another dr. for the other things I hope you see one first about getting your blood pressure under control.

      As for getting pregnant, my husband got tested first after we tried for a year then I got a post coital test on the day I was expected to ovulate after using an ovulation test. Here's a link about a fertility monitor to see when you are ovulating or if you are ovulating. http://www.clearblueeasy.com/index.php?page=ourproducts&subpage=fertilitymonitor

      I hope this helps.

  44. QUESTION:
    I am 17 yrs old and i have irregular periods(once or twice a YEAR),I have dark patches in my neck and armpits,?
    i have oily skin with some acne. . . is this a sign of pcos??? doctors say no...but am i excaggerating or what? i really want to know what all these signs mean!! i need some answers to my questions!...... HELP PLEASE!!

    • ANSWER:
      YES! These ARE signs of PCOS. The dark patches are called Acanthosis Nigricans, and they appear in women with PCOS as a result of too much insulin in your system. Have you been checked for diabetes or insulin resistance? Usually those run hand in hand with PCOS. This disease causes hormonal imbalances that cause a lack of periods or having very few. Back when I first got this doctors misdiagnosed me over and over again and by the time I finally found someone intelligent enough to properly diagnose me, I was reallllly sick and am now infertile and a total diabetic. What kind of doctor are you seeing? You need to see an Ednocrinologist or a GYNO who knows about PCOS. Not all do. Call around and ask if the doctor you're interested in seeing is familiar with PCOS. Don't let them jerk you around. Your blood test results can be minimally off kilter and still you can have this disease. It takes a trained eye to catch it. You need proper treatment or you're just going to get a whole lot worse than what you are now. Trust me. You can lose hair, gain extreme amounts of weight, grow facial hair and are even at higher risk of cancer and strokes.

      If I can be of any help to you further, please email me at: plumpinzeerump@hotmail.com

      SEEK OUT A NEW DOC!

      Edit-
      Sorry, but Liz is WRONG. Insulin resistance and PCOS can go hand in hand. The dark patches are caused by the over-production of insulin. Insulin resistance heightens the risk of PCOS sufferers becoming Pre-Diabetic which can lead to Type 2 Diabetes, an increased risk factor for Cardiovascular Disease. Insulin Resistance can also cause high blood pressure, another risk factor for heart problems.
      PCOS also causes weight gain around the middle. I don't have a big butt, hips or thighs, my weight is around my stomach. I used to have the dark patches under my armpits and on the back of my neck when my insulin overproduction was out of control. I stopped eating sugar and quit drinking soda pop and they are now gone. I still have severe PCOS and all of the hormonal issues that go along with it. The dark patches are not caused by the hormones. It's due to the insulin! They will not lighten as you age. They are there for as long as your insulin level is high. It is a result of excess insulin spilling over into your skin. The first noter even left you a link where they say the very same thing in there.

      Read this. It tells you.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acanthosis_nigricans

      Go here too and read this:
      http://pcos.insulitelabs.com/PCOS-Insulin-Resistance.php

      All you have to do is Google "PCOS and insulin resistance" to read web page after web page about how there is a STRONG link between PCOS and insulin resistance. They believe the insulin attaches to the receptors on the ovary which results in cyst formations.

      I don't know where Liz gets her information, but she is not correct.

  45. QUESTION:
    Advice on Blood Sugar Levels - should I speak to GP?
    Hi, using a blood glucose monitor (a bayer, Breeze 2) I did a DIY OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) this weekend (not just for fun - I have cysts on my ovaries and think I may be insulin resistant [a symptom of PCOS, plus over the years the GP's have checked my blood sugar levels so many times they must think somethings up with it, and my Dad has Diabetes so I want to be careful] but GP wants to do other tests before the OGTT). Anyway my levels on Saturday morning were:

    Blood Test 1 = 8.2 (after 16hr fast)
    Blood Test 2 = 8.8 (30mins after 380ml of Lucozade original)
    Blood Test 3 = 8.9 (1hr after Lucozade)
    Blood Test 4 = 7.6 (2hrs after Lucozade)
    Blood Test 5 = 4.1 (3hrs after Lucozade)

    By blood test 5 (4.1) I was incredibily shaky and starting to sweat - immediately ate a bagel and drank some fruit juice.

    From my research online, I know that my fasting glucose of 8.2 is a bit high (technically classed as Diabetic), but my 3rd blood test (2hrs after Lucozade) is just within the normal range (though I drank only 380ml of Lucozade instead of the recommended 415ml). As my test on Saturday was high I decided to re-test this morning:

    Blood Test 1 = 4.9 (after 8hrs fasting)
    Blood Test 2 = 4.3 (after 14hrs fasting)

    I believe todays levels seem fine. Should I just put saturdays levels down to an anomoly and re-do the OGTT in a month (with the 415ml of Lucozade this time), or should I see my GP about it now?

    I would be particularly grateful if any Dr's or nurses could advise me of this please? GP wants to see me in a month anyway, but for another issue.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Don't rely on OTC testing. There is a difference in the blood testing your doctor does and the finger sticks you do at home. If you have questions, your doctor or his nurse are your best bet -

      (Read this from WEBMD)

      Blood glucose
      Fasting blood glucose:

      70-99 milligrams per deciliter (3.9-5.5 mmol/L)

      2 hours after eating (postprandial):

      70-145 mg/dL (3.9-8.1 mmol/L)

      Random (casual):

      70-125 mg/dL (3.9-6.9 mmol/L)

      Many conditions can change your blood glucose levels. Your doctor will discuss any significant abnormal results with you in relation to your symptoms and past health.

      High values

      You may have diabetes. But your doctor will not use just one test result to diagnose you with the condition.
      The American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria for diagnosing diabetes are met when any of the following results have been repeated on at least two different days: A fasting blood glucose level is 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher.
      A 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test result is 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher. For more information, see the medical test Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.
      Symptoms of diabetes are present and a random blood glucose test is 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher. Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and frequent urination (especially at night), unexplained increase in appetite, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, erection problems, blurred vision, and tingling or numbness in the hands or feet.

      If your fasting blood glucose level measures in the range of 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) to 125 mg/dL (6.9 mmol/L), you are considered to have prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose), and you have an increased chance of getting diabetes.
      Other conditions that can cause high blood glucose levels include severe stress, heart attack, stroke, Cushing's syndrome, medicines such as corticosteroids, or excess production of growth hormone (acromegaly).

      Low values

      A fasting glucose level below 40 mg/dL (2.2 mmol/L) in women or below 50 mg/dL (2.8 mmol/L) in men that is accompanied by symptoms of hypoglycemia may mean you have an insulinoma, a tumor that produces abnormally high amounts of insulin.

      Low glucose levels also may be caused by:
      Addison's disease.
      Decreased thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism).
      A tumor in the pituitary gland.
      Liver disease, such as cirrhosis.
      Kidney failure.
      Malnutrition or an eating disorder, such as anorexia.
      Medicines used to treat diabetes.

  46. QUESTION:
    Just diagnosed with pcos and ttc help!!!?
    For the past eleven months (since I stopped birth control) I have had either irregular periods or none at all (8 out of 11 months without one). I finally decided to go see my obgyn and figure out what is going on with me. She did some tests and it came back as an elevated thyroid, I went to my primary doctor for treatment which I still have not received any medication to help the levels. Today I went back to my obgyn after taking provera as directed and had an internal ultrasound which showed that I also have pcos; she said that I had several cysts on both ovaries but did not start me on anything. I feel extremely discouraged about ttc, I feel that both my obgyn and primary are just blowing off my conditions. I am over weight I am 5'2 and 161 pounds. I haven't always been heavy just in the last year. I really need some good advice as to what I can do to help my pcos subside besides just waiting for my doctors to give me the medications. I want a healthy beautiful baby more then anything. I have lost so much sleep over this. I can't stop thinking about all the challenges I am faced with. Should I take vitamins, drink tea, diet, have "relations" every day??? I don't know if the provera regulated my cycle yet since my period ended on 10/25/2011 but I doubt it now that I know about the pcos. I am also have cramping I would assume from the cysts, since it is coming from that area. Please someone give me good heartfelt advice. I feel extremely defeated and helpless. :(
    Oh, my obgyn also told me that my LH was triple my FSH. Is there any thing I can do!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      I used to be over 300 pounds and had PCOS severely and I got pregnant twice! Are you a type 2 diabetic or have insulin resistance? They usually go hand in hand with PCOS. Ask both your regular Dr and your Gyno about being checked for insulin resistance. Are you a sugary soda pop drinker? If so, avoid it by all costs! When I started drinking only diet drinks, my periods resumed after 18 years of not having a single one and I started ovulating. I got pregnant both times very easily. It took 1 try the first time and 2 tries the 2nd time. Losing just 10% of your weight can jumpstart your ovulation. Whether you're a diabetic or insulin resistant or not you should be on Metformin to treat your PCOS. Ignoring it is the worst thing you can possibly do. You'll get worse as time goes on by gaining lots of weight, developing thinning hair yet growing facial hair like a man. Not to mention being at risk for uterine cancer and strokes. Metformin can get your symptoms under control and can cause ovulation. Tell your Gyno you want to start treatment NOW for your PCOS and don't take no for an answer. It's your health and your life and you need to take control of it. I let them screw me over for years before I got to understand PCOS. I was diagnosed back when little was known about it. Now I consider myself an expert. Avoid sugar and try to go low carb for awhile. You might very well fall pregnant within just a few months. It took me 3 months to begin ovulating after doing what I mentioned. Of course my hormones were too messed up to carry the pregnancies and I miscarried. If you become pregnant you demand they check your progesterone right off the bat! Women with PCOS often miscarry because don't produce enough. They have supplements to fix that. Oh, also demand they address the thyroid problem. That can cause infertility issues as well. Dr's piss me off! Sometimes you have to get demanding and pushy to see results. I think it's time you did. You're not that overweight and you can get pregnant with a little help. METFORMIN! Your Gyno should know that's what they use to treat PCOS!

      Good luck and feel free to email me with any questions or advice!

  47. QUESTION:
    I have been diagnosed with PCOS after using micronor, please help!?
    I started using Ortho Micronor (progestine only birth control pills) about 6 months ago. My period has always been normal and I have never had a problem with ovarian cysts. After starting micronor I have not had a period and have developed ovarian cysts. I had surgery last thursday and was diagnosed with PCOS when they found lots of cysts within my ovaries. I do have a lot of PCOS symptoms so it does explain a lot. I can't help but wonder if micronor had anything to do with this... on the warnings it specifically says "can cause ovarian cysts in some patients" I want to stop taking the micronor but my doctor thinks that I will get cysts if I stop B.C. ... So I was thinking of switching to nuvaring or another B.C. The only reason why i started POPs was because another dr. told me that regular birth control will increase my risk of stroke (because I have migraines with aura). IF ANY1 has ANY advice I would appreciate it. I am new to PCOS & scared that anything i do can make or break me.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      I too was diagnosed with PCOS a few years ago. I started showing symptoms right after using the depo provera injection.

      I did a lot of research on the subject (there are some good books available on amazon), and at one point I came across a group of people researching the link between the depo provera injection and PCOS. However, my research has also told me that women who are pre-disposed to getting PCOS anyway can suddenly develop the symptoms after a sudden hormone change...yep you guessed it...like taking a pill, stopping a pill, having a pregnancy etc. It's hard to say what exactly caused it, or wether or not you would have developed it eventually anyway.

      I would strongly reccomend reading all you can about PCOS. Knowledge is power, especially as some doctors know little about the treatments and testing you can have. Its also good to read up about the best ways to conceive if you have trouble in that department. I have been very lucky so far and conceived my son relatively quickly.

      A really handy forum to talk to others with PCOS and get information is www.soulcysters.net.

      Hope that helped!

      p.s I too was a migraine sufferer and always used POP's.

  48. QUESTION:
    Do I qualify for disability?
    I am a 34 yr.old female.I have type 2 diabetes and my blood sugar is always either too high or it drops out of the blue,I also have two hernias,arthritis in my ankle( I can't stand on it for over a few hours,if I do then I can walk the next day) severe gastritis,abdominal swelling that I have yet to receive a diagnosis for,severe gastritis,costochondritis,possibly irritable bowel syndrome,gastric delaying and a cyst on my ovary that is sometimes painful.I spend alot of time at the doctor having tests done..I don't know what to do,I've always been a hard worker,but now it's sometimes a struggle..

    • ANSWER:
      Kayla, I'm sorry that you have so many health problems but if you are currently working I think you should continue to do so until you absolutely can't. The problem is a matter of severity. Diabetes, for example, isn't considered to be disabling until it causes renal failure/dialysis, loss of limbs due to neuropathy, severe heart disease, severe stroke, blindness etc. I thought hernias could be operated on. A cyst on an ovary is not a disability. Costochrondritis is not a disability. If you are doing a primarily sit-down job or you are capable of doing a sit-down job then the arthritis in your ankles would not be considered to be disabling. Don't know about the irritable bowel syndrome.

      Social Security's definition of disability is that you must have a medically determinable physical or mental impairment(s) so severely disabling that you are not only no longer able to do the job you have but, considering your age, education and work background, you would be incapable of doing any other work at 10 or more per month and the severity would last for at least one full year.

      Because social security considers more than your medical condition in determining whether or not someone is disabled, the decision of disability is not made by your doctor(s). Social Security gathers the medical evidence, evaluates it, considers your age, education & work history and makes the determination.

      I don't think you would meet the definition of disability and if you don't have a secure income from a source other than your job I don't think you should quit your job and file.

  49. QUESTION:
    I might have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?
    I was told that I might have this by my dr. because I only get my period every few months, and he asked me to get some blood tests done to see (I haven't had the tests, because I don't really want to see the results).

    What are the risks of leaving it untreated?

    I was just wondering; if the blood tests confirm that you may have Polycystic Ovaries, what happens then? Are further tests required, and do you need to get medical treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS is notoriously difficult to diagnose. It is a diagnosis of exclusion. In other words, it is important to rule out other diseases that can cause symptoms similar to PCOS (such as Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia). To diagnose PCOS, we use a combination of clinical symptoms (what you experience as the patient, such as excess hair growth, irregular menses, acne, skin tags, weight gain, infertility, etc.) and lab tests.

      The blood tests to consider are:
      - testosterone- elevated in PCOS

      - DHEA-S- elevated in PCOS

      - Fasting insulin- elevated in PCOS. Some doctors may hesitate to order this test because the normal range (0-20) is so wide. However, we find that results greater than 9 indicate insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is usually the underlying cause of PCOS, as you may have read about on our site.

      - Fasting glucose or glucose tolerance test- elevated in PCOS. Using this information in combination with the fasting insulin helps to diagnose insulin resistance. Also, women with PCOS have a higher risk of diabetes so it is important to screen for this early and often.

      - LH: FSH- Some doctors may also look at the ratio between these two hormones. In PCOS, we would expect LH to be elevated in comparison to FSH.

      - You could get an ultrasound to check for the presence of ovarian cysts. Even if the ovaries do appear normal, the absence of ovarian cysts does not mean that you don't have PCOS. Not everyone with PCOS has ovarian cysts.

      - I would also check your cholesterol levels and liver function tests, as these can also be abnormal in PCOS (as well as in many other conditions).

      Lab testing is not mandatory for diagnosing PCOS, especially if you are experiencing so many of the symptoms. However, the above tests do give us numbers which, along with the improvement of your clinical symptoms, help us monitor your progress.

      I do want to let you know that there is another condition called Cushing's disease that has many symptoms of PCOS and is sometimes mistaken for PCOS. If you did have Cushing's disease it may exacerbate the symptoms. Cushing's is not very common, but I still wanted to mention it to you. This would be something to discuss with your doctor to ensure it has been ruled out.

      As for leaving it untreated- I would not suggest this. The long-term consequences of PCOS and its underlying cause, insulin resistance, can be quite severe. Insulin resistance is a serious condition and unfortunately is not widely recognized in allopathic or western medicine as such. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of the following disorders and diseases: heart disease, diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian syndrome, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, and elevated cholesterol levels. So you would be at increased rick for heart attacks, strokes, obesity, infertility, and numerous other things. PCOS is more than just a disorder of the reproductive system- it affects your ENTIRE BODY!!! If you have been diagnosed with insulin resistance reversal of the condition is recommended. Additionally, by not menstruating (getting your period) each month you are at higher risk for endometrial cancer so yes it is important to find a way to manage it.

      If you are interested in natural treatment here is an AWESOME site: www.pcos.insulitelabs.com

  50. QUESTION:
    What do you do when you have multi issues and haven't seen a doc in 15 years?
    Ok I havent been to a doctor in about 15 years, normaly I deal with my issues myself due to lack of funds altho lately my issues have become worse. I urinate every hour on the hour and its cloudy, Im over weight yes so Im open to understanding if its diabetes. Also I believe I have something wrong with my ovaries, in all the time Ive been sexually active Ive never been able to get pregnant but I do end up having really bad abdominatable (yes I cant spell it lol) pain also I havent had a monthly since I was 18 and I'm now 32. With being 32 and knowing that it can only get worse as I get older I know I need some help with it all and cant do the things a doctor can to fix them is there anyone that can tell me what all this MIGHT be and what kind of doctors I need to be seeing to fix it if its fixable at all?

    • ANSWER:
      See a general doctor first. You may then need to be referred to a specialist. The doctor will do a work up of possible conditions. It helps to write down all your symptoms and hand it to the doctor or read it out. You may forget to mention something when you are in the doctors office.

      Causes of cloudy urine include:

      Dehydration
      Urinary Tract Infections
      Water soluble vitamins
      Certain foods
      Diabetes
      Pregnancy
      Medications
      Chemicals
      Kidney stones
      Other kidney malfunctions and diseases
      Blood in urine
      Prostatitis (men)

      Cloudy urine >>>
      http://health-pain.blogspot.com/2009/02/cloudy-urine.html
      http://www.healtharticles101.com/top-10-cloudy-urine-causes/

      Causes of frequent urination include:

      Drinking a lot of fluids
      Pregnancy
      Diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2)
      Diabetes Insipidus
      Urinary Tract Infection
      Overactive bladder
      Enlarged prostate
      Side effects of certain medications
      Pyelonephritis
      Urosepsis
      Vitamin B12 deficiency
      Magnesium deficiency
      Calcium deficiency
      Vitamin C deficiency
      Bladder Cancer
      Bladder Infection
      Congestive Heart Failure
      Cystocele
      Polycystic renal diseases
      Fibromyalgia
      Interstitial Cystitis
      Multiple Myeloma
      Mutiple Sclerosis
      Stroke or other neurological diseases

      Frequent urination >>>
      http://www.livestrong.com/article/9934-identify-frequent-urination-reasons/
      http://www.medicinenet.com/frequent_urination/symptoms.htm

      Causes of secondary amenorrhoea (menstruation cycles ceasing) include:

      Polycystic ovarian disease (PCOS)
      Ovarian cysts
      Hypothyroidism
      Hyperthyroidism
      Obesity
      Anaemia - iron, vitamin B12, folate
      Other nutritional deficiencies
      Stress
      Exercise
      Eating disorders and weight loss (obesity, anorexia nervosa, or bulimia)
      Intrauterine adhesions
      Sheehan syndrome
      Hyperprolactinaemia
      Haemochromatosis
      Arrhenoblastoma
      Anovulation
      Menopause
      Premature menopause
      Drug induced

      Secondary amenorrheoa >>>
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amenorrhoea
      http://www.homeomiracles.com/Female/Female_cures/Secondary_amenorrhoea.htm


cysts on ovaries what causes a stroke