Tag Archives: Brain Stroke

Are Hemorrhagic Cyst Dangerous

The information about hemorrhagic stroke should be focused on the symptoms of stroke, causes, risk factors, diagnosis, complications and treatments. This condition is just a form of Brain Stroke that results to drastic outcomes. Brain has several protective layers; the Dura matter and most especially the skull that encloses this organ. At birth, the skull of a person overrides with each other and as the person grows older the skull completely closes which disables the ability of the brain cavity to append its normal volume and pressure.

Hemorrhagic Stroke occurs when there is a seeping of blood from the tissues or blood vessels. Blood that seeps out from its origin causes irritation of the brain tissue and swelling can occur. The blood coming from these sources accumulate and form a hematoma. Since the normal structure of the brain cavity doesn t include hematoma, the intracranial pressure will then increase. This is due to the pressure that the hematoma causes on the brain tissue that can further result to serious damages on it.

There are various types of Hemorrhagic stroke according to the site where the bleeding occurs. The bleeding can happen in the brain matter, termed as intracerebral haemorrhage. Intracranial aneurysms are the bulging of weak walls of the arteries that can rupture at any point of the person s life most specifically when a person is at a heightened emotional state and stressed.

However, this weakness of the arteries may not just result from previous diseases like hypertension; it also entails its origin from congenital malformations like the arteriovenous malformations. This condition gives an outcome of arteries and veins entanglement inside the brain. The reason why malfunctions of the capillary beds happen that can contribute to the bulging of the arteries. The last type of Hemorrhagic Stroke is the subarachnoid bleeding. It is the most fatal form of stroke because it involves the main blood supply of the brain.

The symptoms of stroke, specifically for hemorrhagic stroke, comprise various manifestations depending on the bleeding location and the amount of damage it has resulted. The most typical report of patients who experienced this condition is headache. Wide-range physical and psychological assessments will reveal the level of the neurological dysfunctions that occurred. There are instances that the symptoms exhibited by the patients are just side effects of the treatment regimen given to them. The risk factors that are associated with the occurrence or stroke are gender, age and ethnicity.

This is an emergency situation where the diagnosis of its incidence is very important to determine what treatment is appropriate for the patient. It entails a number of high quality screening examinations. These screening tests are composed of imagery tests, electrical activity and blood flow tests. Complications may also arise during these conditions due to hypoxia such as seizure, cerebral vasospasm, increased intracranial pressure and systemic high blood pressure. Treatments for this condition are diverse and needs to be performed immediately to avert fatal damages or sudden death of the patient. The management of Hemorrhagic Stroke comprises a collaborative approach of using medications and undergoing surgical interventions.


are hemorrhagic cyst dangerous

Is A Hemorrhagic Cyst Dangerous

The information about hemorrhagic stroke should be focused on the symptoms of stroke, causes, risk factors, diagnosis, complications and treatments. This condition is just a form of Brain Stroke that results to drastic outcomes. Brain has several protective layers; the Dura matter and most especially the skull that encloses this organ. At birth, the skull of a person overrides with each other and as the person grows older the skull completely closes which disables the ability of the brain cavity to append its normal volume and pressure.

Hemorrhagic Stroke occurs when there is a seeping of blood from the tissues or blood vessels. Blood that seeps out from its origin causes irritation of the brain tissue and swelling can occur. The blood coming from these sources accumulate and form a hematoma. Since the normal structure of the brain cavity doesn t include hematoma, the intracranial pressure will then increase. This is due to the pressure that the hematoma causes on the brain tissue that can further result to serious damages on it.

There are various types of Hemorrhagic stroke according to the site where the bleeding occurs. The bleeding can happen in the brain matter, termed as intracerebral haemorrhage. Intracranial aneurysms are the bulging of weak walls of the arteries that can rupture at any point of the person s life most specifically when a person is at a heightened emotional state and stressed.

However, this weakness of the arteries may not just result from previous diseases like hypertension; it also entails its origin from congenital malformations like the arteriovenous malformations. This condition gives an outcome of arteries and veins entanglement inside the brain. The reason why malfunctions of the capillary beds happen that can contribute to the bulging of the arteries. The last type of Hemorrhagic Stroke is the subarachnoid bleeding. It is the most fatal form of stroke because it involves the main blood supply of the brain.

The symptoms of stroke, specifically for hemorrhagic stroke, comprise various manifestations depending on the bleeding location and the amount of damage it has resulted. The most typical report of patients who experienced this condition is headache. Wide-range physical and psychological assessments will reveal the level of the neurological dysfunctions that occurred. There are instances that the symptoms exhibited by the patients are just side effects of the treatment regimen given to them. The risk factors that are associated with the occurrence or stroke are gender, age and ethnicity.

This is an emergency situation where the diagnosis of its incidence is very important to determine what treatment is appropriate for the patient. It entails a number of high quality screening examinations. These screening tests are composed of imagery tests, electrical activity and blood flow tests. Complications may also arise during these conditions due to hypoxia such as seizure, cerebral vasospasm, increased intracranial pressure and systemic high blood pressure. Treatments for this condition are diverse and needs to be performed immediately to avert fatal damages or sudden death of the patient. The management of Hemorrhagic Stroke comprises a collaborative approach of using medications and undergoing surgical interventions.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    5cm hemorrhagic cyst in ovary?
    After having abdominal pain for months, I had an ultrasound done and was told that I have a 5cm (by 6cm?) hemorrhagic cyst in my right ovary. I'm going to have an appointment with a gyno soon so they can figure out what to do. What is the typical treatment for this? Is there a possibility this could be dangerous?

    • ANSWER:
      Well typically the treatment is meds to reduce the cyst or sometimes surgery to remove it. Yes a cyst can be dangerous because if it pops it can damage your ovary, sometimes enough to even need an ovary removed.

  2. QUESTION:
    Should I see an OBGYN after cyst ruptures?
    I recently spent 5 days in the hospital for abdominal pain. At first they thought it was appendicitis. It wasn't. They did a colonoscopy and vaginal ultrasound. They said a hemmorhagic cyst ruptured. I spent 3 days on a pain medicine pump. They didn't seem concerned about the cyst. I've read that it can be dangerous when they rupture. I'm home and have no pain now. Will the cyst return? Should I see my OBGYN for possible surgery? Or does everything just clear up on its own? I've never had cysts before. I'm a 30 yr old female. How long does it take if they come back?

    • ANSWER:
      Hemorrhagic cysts are a very common types of cysts. This is actually an ovarian cyst and it is caused when a blood vessel in the wall of a cyst breaks, causing blood to flood into the cyst.

      Hemorrhagic cysts are a type of functional cyst, meaning that they occur during the course of the female menstruation process and are affected by the hormones. Functional cysts, also known as simple cysts, have nothing to do with disease. These types of cysts can require no treatment, and usually resolve without the need for surgery.

      It sounds like your hemorrhagic cyst ruptured but resolved without the need for surgery which is not unusual

      Any condition that was severe enough to hospitalize you should be talked about with your doctor. If you have a family history of ovarian cancer then any ovarian cysts must checked carefully for signs of malignancy although this seems unlikely in your case.. The conclusion is that this type of ailment must be clinically correlated to you family history, current state of health, risk factors, and physical examination so yes talk to your doctor

  3. QUESTION:
    Can anyone advise is Haemorrhagic Corpus Luteum dangerous?

    • ANSWER:
      There are only two situations demanding emergency surgery (a danger) for an ovarian cyst:

      1. Hemorrhagic cyst with significant blood loss resulting in anemia.

      2. Severe unrelenting pain which can't be controlled with medicine.

      The most common cause of significant hemorrhage from an ovarian cyst is a hemorrhagic corpus luteum cyst. The corpus luteum is a normal cystic structure that forms after ovulation each month. There is a physiologic in-growth of capillaries into the corpus luteum after several days, which sometimes is a bit excessive and which can rarely result in severe bleeding.

      If a woman is taking birth control pills, ovulation shouldn't occur, so a hemorrhagic corpus luteum would be unlikely in that situation. The severity of symptoms and accompanying shock due to low blood pressure make the severity of the situation obvious to everyone. A patient would not be able to make a phone call or worry about not being able to go to the hospital since this can be a true emergency.

      Severe unrelenting pain, sometimes accompanied by nausea and vomiting, off on one side or the other could be a symptom of an ovarian cyst, or could be due to something else like appendicitis or tubal (ectopic) pregnancy. Ovarian cysts rarely cause severe pain like this, although if an ovarian cyst twists, it can do so.

      Leakage of the fluid contents of a cyst can sometimes cause pain that improves over the next few days, although if a cyst is filled with only clear fluid, not much pain might occur. Ultrasound examination can sometimes tell if a cyst is present and what type of fluid it might be filled with. If a cyst has truly been present and ruptures, ultrasound might be able to tell if the free fluid is bloody, filled with clots, or if it is greasy (as can occur with rupture of a dermoid cyst), or just clear like water.

      Sometimes a gynaecologist can insert a needle through the rear wall of the vagina and retrieve some of the free fluid to see what its nature is. Severe or worsening pain uncontrolled by simple medicines is a reason to consider surgery.

      Most ovarian cysts come and go and do not need emergency surgery. Birth control pills do not make cysts go away, although many times they are prescribed for that purpose. Although birth control pills are supposed to keep the ovaries from ovulating, the low dose pills on the market do not always keep the ovaries totally suppressed, so the ovaries can sometimes form cysts even on the pill.

      A cyst can't always be palpated on exam, and sometimes an ultrasound will be ordered to investigate pelvic pain further. A cyst as small as 1 centimeter in diameter can be seen on ultrasound. Since ovulation cysts can sometimes get to 2.5 to 3 centimeters in diameter, the presence of small cysts on ultrasound is common and may not be related to pain. A cyst size of over 6 centimeters is the arbitrary level at which surgery is frequently recommended since cysts of such a size may not go away on their own, although even large cysts don't always cause pain or undergo rupture.

      Ultrasound can frequently suggest what type of a cyst is present and this might give an idea of whether it will go away or not. Endometriosis cysts can be suggested by ultrasound, but even the presence of a sizable cyst is not an emergency if it's not associated with severe pain or bleeding as discussed above. The cyst did not grow to a large size overnight and most endometrioma cysts don't rupture cataclysmically. They occasionally will leak slightly, then the cyst wall can re-seal. When they leak, they may cause pain for a few days, which then improves. Such leakage can occur every few months in some patients, sometimes only once in others. There is no evidence whatsoever that a leaking endometrioma cyst causes endometriosis to spread.

      So, if you have a cyst which appears to be an endometrioma cyst, it is not an emergency to have surgery at once. In fact, this can sometimes be a bad idea since frequently other areas of disease in the pelvis are not treated because the presence of the cyst can result in tunnel vision on the part of the surgeon (looking only at the immediate issue).

      In most cases, women thought to have even large endometrioma cysts can avoid emergency surgery and wait to schedule endometriosis surgery, unless severe pain or bleeding might be occurring. Even if ultrasound suggests a cancerous cyst, this is not an emergency, although this should obviously be handled in a timely manner.

      I would recommend you discuss your options, symptoms and concerns with your doctor/gynaecologist. They will be able to better explain this all to you.

      Good luck :)

  4. QUESTION:
    How Dangerous is a Ruptured Hemorrhagic Cyst?
    My doctors and nurses told me hat I do have a Hemorraphic cyst, but I am not allowed to do anything about it. They said to wait until it ruptures and to still never bring it up to them again. They also dubbed these weird and severe fainting/vomiting/panic attack spells as "immature/innapropriate" behavior that got me discrarged form a hospital early for not breaking out of them when I was told to.

    Is this right? Also, what happens if it bursts? Wouldn't it be serious? I suppose if they said to ignore it and ignore it if it bursts then there's nothing wrong, but I'm not sure...

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a doctor appt. next week, bt just wondering if this sounds like one. Very irregular periods, almost certain i am not pregnant, painful sex, bloating, sharp pains and cramping in lower left side of my stomach. just wondering if this sounds like I may have a cyst? thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have them also and here is some information that helped me

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.
      What causes ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.
      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).
      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?

      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

  6. QUESTION:
    So I have a cyst on my ovary?
    So, for the past 3 weeks or so I've had horrible stomach pain. It got to the point it hurt to eat and over only a month I've lost five pounds. I saw my doctor and I got a cat-scan. I won't go into the unpleasantness of that.

    Anyways.
    The cat-scan results came back and my mother (a RN) told me that I have a large cyst on my left mid ovary. From what she told me it is large enough to be dangerous and they don't expect it to go away on it's own.

    I'm only 14 and frankly, I don't know what to think. On Monday I am seeing a Gynecologist. Just the thought of that is frightening.

    So, I have some questions before my visit.

    Should I be worried about not being able to have children when I grow up?
    What procedures are there to get rid of it? Are there non-invasive ways like medication?
    Is all of my pain normal, or could there be another complication?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving when you're older and want to have kids, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your future pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age. You are still very young and I don't think that in your case this ovarian cyst you have will leave you infertile.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cyst that you speak to the gynaecologist you're going to be seeing and ask him to answer any of your questions. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency, however mostly ovarian cysts (sometimes larger one's) can resolve themselves too.

      Good luck :)

  7. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with 3in Hemorrhagic Cyst in ER. Will I need surgery?
    I the cyst hasn't ruptured yet, there is a lot of pain and pressure. I need to try to get in to my gyno this week to talk about it - and am worried I may need surgery. I had plans to leave town on X-mas eve, and should cancel plans if I will need surgery. Anyone know what the dr. does with a cyst that size?

    • ANSWER:
      You really need to talk to your gynecologist about this if you can wait that long. If the ER doctor said it was okay for you to leave the hospital, then I guess it was his opinion, but I do hope he warned you of all the problems this could make for you too. A hemorrhagic cyst is one that is bleeding internally already. Then amount of pain and pressure should tell you it might not be too long before it completely ruptures all the way, with causing internal bleeding that can't be stopped without the surgery. This is a dangerous situation. Please take the time to take care of your health first. Surgery is never pleasant for anyone, but it's better then death. When you bleed internally the doctors might not be able to stop it in time and then Christmas Eve and Christmas Day would really be bad for your family every year at this time. Never put off until tomorrow what you can have done safely today. Good luck and God Bless

  8. QUESTION:
    blood cyst?
    the net says its a hemorrhagic cyst but when i look it up all i get is stuff about ovarian cysts. but i have one on my left breast. my mom gets them too but she doesn't seem to know anything about them.

    anybody know anything about them?

    • ANSWER:
      I have one in my left breast as well. It's pretty rare - my doctor had never even heard of it before the biopsy results - and I haven't found any good information online about it. I can't even remember the full name, but it was described to me as a cyst made of tightly-knit blood vessels. I was told it was not cancerous or otherwise dangerous, but there is a small chance it will keep growing and need to be taken out for the sake of comfort/beauty. Sometimes they are reabsorbed and disappear completely.

      I found a website at some point that mentioned it might be affected by birth control pills, although it is hereditary (my mom had one taken out when she was young - they used to take out most cysts back then). I noticed mine when I was 25, and it has varied in size in the three years since then, biggest about the size and shape of a peanut in its shell. It throbs and hurts a little around my period but doesn't bother me otherwise.

  9. QUESTION:
    Can exercise rupture an ovarian cyst?
    I got an ultrasound done today and the lab tech saw a cyst on my left ovary that appears to be twice the size of my uterus. Would it be dangerous to exercise? I need to start loosing weight and I plan on using the new Wii Fit that uses hula hooping and abdominal twists.

    • ANSWER:
      OVARIAN CYSTS

      About Your Diagnosis

      Ovarian cysts are fluid filled structures that develop in the ovary. Ovarian cysts develop with every menstrual cycle. Fluid collects around developing eggs; one egg becomes "dominant" and that egg ovulates (leaves the ovary and goes into the fallopian tube). The ovulated egg leaves a cyst behind in the ovary. This cyst is usually 2 3 centimeters (1 2 inches) in diameter. This type of cyst is called a "physiologic cyst," "follicular cyst," or "simple cyst." If the cyst remains a normal size, it does not cause any symptoms. If the cyst grows larger, 4 centimeters or larger, it can cause pain. Symptomatic cysts are very common; in most cases, the cyst and symptoms will resolve without any treatment.

      Occasionally, cysts can bleed into themselves. A very small blood vessel in the wall of the cyst breaks, and the blood goes into the cyst. These are called "hemorrhagic cysts" and sometimes are more painful. Hemorrhagic cysts are common as well. Occasionally, hemorrhagic cysts can rupture, and the blood goes into the abdominal cavity. No blood is seen out of the vagina. If a cyst ruptures, it is usually very painful. Hemorrhagic cysts that rupture are less common. Most hemorrhagic cysts are self-limiting; some need surgical intervention (see below). Even if the hemorrhagic cyst ruptures, in many cases it will resolve without surgery. Sometimes surgery is necessary.
      READ MORE..
      http://apma-nc.com/PatientEducation/ovarian_cysts.htm

  10. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What are some of the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I have an ovarian cyst. Usually it only bothers me during and before my cycle, and when I move or twist certain ways.

      One burst a couple of months ago, and I experienced severe pain, but once it burst, it felt better (I went to the ER).

      Symptoms can be a pinching or cramping feeling, passing dry blood or "water" when it is not your time of the month.

      Sometimes they will do surgery for them. I don't want surgery because I'm on Coumadin, so I'm holding out as long as I can!

      Some are dangerous, and need medical attention...

      Here's some stuff you might find helpful:

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40 s, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are functioning ovarian cysts, which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20 s and 30 s, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common functioning ovarian cysts. Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it s just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

  11. QUESTION:
    can ovarian cysts cause infertility?
    my doctor just told me that i have ovarian cysts on both of my ovaries. i just wanted to know if they cause infertility

    • ANSWER:
      yes! they sure can. have em checked out..

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?
      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?
      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      How are ovarian cysts treated? continued...
      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

      Ovarian Cysts At A Glance
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures.
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons.
      When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one.
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound.
      The treatment of ovarian cysts varies from observation and monitoring to surgical procedures.

      hope that this info helps.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have 2 right ovarian hemorragic cysts and has raptured for a minute is this dangerous?
    Ok heres my problem my doctor told me i had 2 cyst on my right ovary one is 3.5 cm and the other one is is 2.6 cm and my ovary is enlarged whitch measures 5.3 i have a two right hemorrhagic cysts and they Raptured and was bleeding now im having pelvic and back pain and my bowls are backed up

    ok last year i thought i was preg because i went to the hospital i told them i was having pain down there and back pain dident nodody knw wat was wrng wit me so now i knw do you think i had the cyst last year? Now my doc knw everything she said shes goin to have the cysts remove am i going to have a operation?

    I went to the hospital yesterday because im having chronic pelvic pain and my uterus swollon and stomach bad back pain they did nothing but give me pain meds bt not working

    the walls of my cysts are mildly thickened and hyperechoic is this dangerous for me ?

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor told you she was going to remove the cysts, that is an operation. Once the cysts are removed, your symptoms should go away.

  13. QUESTION:
    Feel like needles are stabbing my ovary!!?
    Hi there! I'm 24 and newly married and last week I went in for an ultrasound for abdominal pain and found out I had a cyst on my left ovary. In the past couple if days it has felt like needles are sticking into it. The pain hasnt subsided and is increasing but isnt to a point where i need an er. What should I do? Planning on going to gym this week when my menstrual cycle is over. I'm also overheating constantly and getting super nauseous and light headed. Not pregnant Drs already checked

    • ANSWER:
      The cyst could have ruptured and be causing this pain. IT is not dangerous just means you ovulated. Sometimes they become what we called hemorrhagic cysts and can be as painful as your describing, again they are harmless just painful and annoying. If the pain does not decrease in the next few days and meds don't help, you should contact your GYN to see if another ultrasound is needed to determine what is going on.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can anyone tell me more about Ovarian Cysts? and what are the possibilites of it popping when flying?

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go I hope this helps! And no Flying won't make it pop/rupture!

      Background: Ovarian cysts and their complications can be present from the neonatal period to postmenopause. Most ovarian cysts occur in the childbearing years and are benign in nature. However, ovarian cysts can herald an underlying malignant process or, possibly, become a red herring, distracting the clinician from a more dangerous condition, such as ectopic pregnancy, ovarian torsion, or appendicitis.

      Pathophysiology: Under the guidance of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the healthy ovary produces hormones that regulate follicular maturation and degeneration within the menstrual cycle.

      Multiple follicles are recruited during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. However, only one follicle reaches maturity and produces estrogen. The follicular cyst transforms into a corpus luteum following ovulation and produces progesterone until the beginning of the next cycle. At that time, the follicle usually atrophies into the corpus albicans.

      Follicular dysgenesis occurs with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction or because of native anatomic defects in the reproductive system. When follicular development into a corpus luteum is arrested, a luteal ovarian cyst can result.

      Two functional ovarian cysts may develop; follicular cysts (ie, graafian follicular cysts) occur in the first 2 weeks of the cycle, and corpus luteal cysts occur in the later half of the cycle. The rupture of the follicular cyst can lead to sharp severe unilateral pain of mittelschmerz (occurring mid-cycle), and it is experienced by approximately 25% of menstruating women. Similarly, failure of corpus luteum degeneration leads to a luteal cyst formation. These may become inflamed or spontaneously hemorrhage, producing symptoms during the later half of the menstrual cycle.

      Carcinomatous processes of the ovary, both primary and metastatic (eg, Krukenberg tumors), frequently are complicated by cystic degeneration. The formation of inclusions of the ovary's germinal epithelium may lead to cystic development.

      Ovarian cysts can cause adnexal torsion, with a predilection to the right side. Cysts larger than 4 cm are more likely to cause torsion, but reports of such occurrences have been observed at 2 cm. Torsion more commonly occurs in a cystic ovary accompanied by a tumor, with benign processes outnumbering malignant ones. Benign dermoid cysts are the most common growth associated with torsion. Because torsion results from complete or partial twisting of the ovarian pedicle, an obvious sequela is ovarian necrosis. This sequence terminates with inflammation, possibly leading to infection, sepsis, and death. Increased incidences of ureteral injury, ovarian vessel thrombosis, and concomitant pulmonary emboli also have been reported.

      Ovarian cysts are commonly complicated by hemorrhage. The right side appears preferred in hemorrhagic degeneration. It is postulated that the rigid rectosigmoid on the left provides cushioning from trauma and twisting. This may reduce torsion and hemorrhagic complications. The relatively lax ileocecal region on the right is not as efficient at such prevention as the left.

      In patients with a hemorrhagic ovarian cyst, look for an ectopic pregnancy because the coexistence of both entities is increased. Putting the obvious complications aside, a hemorrhagic cyst in the course of pregnancy leads to a marked increase in the incidence of spontaneous abortions and warrants close obstetrical observance.

      The timing of the menstrual cycle may help to differentiate the types of hemorrhagic cysts. Graafian follicle cysts occur in the initial 2-3 weeks of the cycle, whereas corpus luteal cysts occur in the final 1-2 weeks of the cycle.

      Ovarian cysts also are associated with infertility and irregular menstrual bleeding. Finding a cyst in a woman of postmenopausal age should prompt an all out search for ovarian neoplasms. No functional cysts occur in women of this age because they have no corpus luteum or graafian follicle. Furthermore, a normal palpable ovary is not present at this age because the normal postmenopausal ovary shrinks to an undetectable size on physical examination.

      In the neonatal period, ovarian cysts may complicate development and are associated with the development of massive ascites, pulmonary hypoplasia, and renal insufficiency.

      Frequency:

      In the US: Ovarian cysts occur in 30% of females with regular menses, 50% of females with irregular menses, and 6% of postmenopausal women.
      Mortality/Morbidity: Mortality and morbidity are caused by pain from rupture, hemorrhagic rupture, peritonitis, adnexal torsion, infertility, irregular vaginal bleeding, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and underlying malignancy.

      Sex: Ovarian cysts occur only in females.

      Age: The domain of ovarian cysts is perinatal to postmenopausal, with a preponderance in the childbearing years.

  15. QUESTION:
    please only answer if you know the question?
    i had my 6 week scan today and i was told i have blood on the sac and an haemorrhagic cyst on my left ovary please if you know what this means tell me ? is it dangerous??

    • ANSWER:
      I had blood on the sac when I had my first ultrasound at 8 weeks all is fine now at 29 weeks. It is common to see a "subchorionic hematoma" which is blood in the layers of the placenta (near the sac but not part of the sac itself). This occurs during formation of the placenta and is usually disappears within a few weeks. I also have a cyst, it's on my right ovary. Your doctor will do a few extra ultrasounds to keep tabs on the size of the cyst. I go in for my last check in two weeks. It is still the same size so far and has not effected anything. All women are different though, if is does get bigger they will remove it after birth.

  16. QUESTION:
    Intramedullary cystic spinal cord lesion with hemorragic fluid content?

    My Aunty who is 56 is reported with intramedullary cystic lesion at C2,C3,C4,C5 region . The MRI says this Hemorrhagic cyst.

    The two MRI in a one year period shows growth in the cystic lesion from 4,0.8,0.8 to 6.3,1.0,1.3

    The doctor neurosurgeon told it needs to be operated and there are chances of not being a successful one. If failed it would end in paralysis

    We could not understand what exactly this is and what are the treatment options available and best place to do this.

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      Well I'm not a neurosurgeon, but my daughter had neurosurgery back in January. Best I can tell, a Hemorrhagic cyst is a cyst filled with blood and other fluid.
      Operating could prove dangerous due to the spinal region it is in.
      I think the best thing would be to get a second opinion. Neuros are all very different, and as I learned, it really pays to search until you find one you are comfortable with.
      Not sure where you live. The one I used is in Portland, OR and is an amazing lady. And also, neuros can be jerks too...a lot of God complex and attitude in some cases..so don't be surprised by that. Good luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    pain in my lower left pelvic area?
    im 14, and i get this strange, sharp pain in the lower left region of my pelvic area. I dont get this pay consecutively or extremely frequently but i wouldn't say i get it rarely either.
    I thought at first it could be a period cramp because i sometimes get cramps prior to my period and while it feel like a cramp, its a little more intense/sharp. I ruled that possibility out since i've already had my period this month, and the only time i get it twice is when i get it one the 1st of the month (is that normal??) so what could it be, and how dangerous is it to my health if i dont get it checked out?

    Thanks alot!

    • ANSWER:
      If you have pain in your ovary area (this is the area you seem to be describing in your question), then you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced the same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst.

      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding this pain you are experiencing, that you consult with your doctor/gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  18. QUESTION:
    I have 2 right ovarian hemorragic cysts and has raptured for a minute is this dangerous?
    Ok heres my problem my doctor told me i had 2 cyst on my right ovary one is 3.5 cm and the other one is is 2.6 cm and my ovary is enlarged whitch measures 5.3 i have a two right hemorrhagic cysts and they Raptured and was bleeding now im having pelvic and back pain and my bowls are backed up

    ok last year i thought i was preg because i went to the hospital i told them i was having pain down there and back pain dident nodody knw wat was wrng wit me so now i knw do you think i had the cyst last year? Now my doc knw everything she said shes goin to have the cysts remove am i going to have a operation?

    I went to the hospital yesterday because im having chronic pelvic pain and my uterus swollon and stomach bad back pain they did nothing but give me pain meds bt not working

    the walls of my cysts are mildly thickened and hyperechoic is this dangerous for me ?

    • ANSWER:
      If there is bleeding maybe that would be a concern. But by the sounds of it your doctor doesn't seem to be concerned. Now about the operation/surgery every thing is done so much more advanced that you will be feeling better quicker. For example I had gall bladder surgery 6 years ago and all the doctors did was four little holes where they stuck instrurments to do the surgery. In a week I was feeling good compared to maybe a month if they would of cut me open.

  19. QUESTION:
    Need help with this ultrasound! Please!!?
    I recently had an ultrasound and need help interpreting the results. My Dr is of no help and I'm planning on transferring Drs, however, for the time being, can someone please help me understand this?

    The uterus is normal in size, measuring7.3cm in greatest length on transadbominal examination. It is retroverted and slightly retroflexed, smooth in contour and homogeneous in echotexture without any discrete myomas visualized.

    The endometrium is normal in thickness, measuring 10.7mm on transvaginal examination, and the endometrial cavity is empty.

    Both ovaries are well visualized on transvaginal examination and each is normal in size. The right ovary measures 4/1 x 2.1 x 2.2 cm (volume 10 cc) and the left ovary 5.4 x 2 x 2.5 cm (volume 13.8 cc). There are small simple follicular cysts in each ovary measuring less than 1 cm in diameter. These findings are unchanged from the prior study. On the current examination there is a thick walled complex hypoechoic focus in the left ovary measuring 1.5 x 1.2 x 1.4 cm, and this is consistent with a hemorrhagic cyst or involuting follicle. Again noted is a simple paraovarian cyst on the right measuring 1.2 x .08 x 1.3 cm, not significantly changed from the prior study. No other abnormal adnexal or pelvic mass or fluid collection is identified.

    Impression:
    1.Normal appearance of the uterus and endometrium.
    2.Normal sized ovaries with multiple small simple follicular cysts in each ovary, similar in appearance to the study of 2011. There is a complex focus in the left ovary consistent with a hemorrhagic cyst or involuting follicle.
    3.No change in the simple right paraovarian cyst.

    What do the multiple small simple follicular cysts mean? Is this PCOS?

    Is this a normal ultrasound?

    Does the cyst on my left ovary mean I just ovulated from my left ovary?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. Definitely PCOS.
      With PCOS cysts form inside the ovary their usually small ones. Their not dangerous. Because they mostly occur during time of ovulation. During ovulation instead of eggs being released they turn to cysts and no pregnancy will occur.
      If an egg is released during ovulation pregnancy might occur.

      You need to see a different doctor. You can also google PCOS pics and you see what I'm talking about when the cysts form inside the ovary.

      Edit: You developed cysts because they didn't release from your ovary. With PCOS your eggs are immature. What you mentioned(multiple cysts) is PCOS(polycystic ovaries).

      Good luck

  20. QUESTION:
    can anyone give any advice please?
    anyone help me?
    my daughter is now 3 and i have been on the mini pill since her birth, ive had no periods since then, last weekend i forgot my pill and had sex the day after and a few times before i forgot to take it, since then i have been feeling sick, had stomach pains and keep going really light headed, i dont think im pregnant well it wouldnt work that quick i know just wondered if anyone had any advice, yesterday i also had a sharp continuous pain at the left side of my belly button for about an hour it kept gettin stronger then faded a little

    • ANSWER:
      left side? odd. It might be just anxiety that you got preggo. Though you may also be pregnant. My symptoms with my second child began like that immediately, almost. You MAY have a ruptured cyst. Especially if hormones are at play. I've had four of them. and all symptoms fit that. I'd give it two days and if it's a ruptured cycst it should gradually get better (though it may hurt for a week).

      most cyst are fluid filled and non-dangerous. Some cysts are hemorrhagic and others are cancerous. The fluid filled ones are most common and when it ruptures it spills fluid into the body which irritates and causes pain (sometimes great pain) and can cause nausea. A cyst that hemorrhages obviously would cause light headedness, but usually visible blood, too. I have a bet that hormones are at stake here and it's related to that and you should wait and see. if the pain persists go see a doc. Could be endometriosis, too. I have that. but it doesn't usually ocme out of the blue, lol

  21. QUESTION:
    Why humans like to create problem and at the same time solved problems?

    • ANSWER:
      What follows is an abridged list of human maladies (problem) and at the same time human too are relentlessly pursuing to solve the problem.I'm just giving you the half, so enjoy reading.

      abscesses, acne, addictions, adenitis, adenoids, AIDS, albinism, allergies, ALS (Lou Gehrig s disease), Alzheimer s disease, amnesia, anemia, aneurysms, angina, anorexia nervosa, anthrax, anxiety attacks, aphasia, appendicitis, apoplexy, arteriosclerosis, arthritis, asphyxia, asthma, astigmatism, athlete s foot, attention deficit disorder (ADD), back aches, bedsores, Bell s palsy, beriberi, bipolar disorder (manic-depression), birth defects, blackouts, bladder infections, blemishes, blindness, blisters, bloating, boils, bone cancer, bone spurs, botulism, bowlegs, breast cancer, brain cancer, breech presentations, Bright s disease, brittle bone disease, broken bones, bronchitis, bruises, bulimia, bunions, bursitis, calcinosis, canker sores, cardiac dysrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, cataracts, cellulitis, cerebral palsy, cervical cancer, cervicitis, chapped lips, chickenpox, chlamydia, choking, cholera, cleft lips and palates, clubfoot (talipes), cold sores, colic, colitis, colon cancer, color blindness, comas, common cold, concussions, congestion, congestive heart failure, conjunctivitis, constipation, convulsions, coronary occlusions, coughs, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, cystic fibrosis, cystitis, cysts, dandruff, dangerous plants and animals, deafness, deformities, dehydration, delirium, delirium tremens, delusions, dementia, dental problems, depression, dermatitis, detached retinas, deviated septums, diabetes, diaper rash, diarrhea, diphtheria, dislocated joints, dizziness, Down s syndrome, droughts, dysentery, dyslexia, dysphagia, dysphasia, dysuria, ear infections, earthquakes, Ebola virus, ectopic pregnancies, eczema, edema, elephantiasis, embolisms, emphysema, encephalitis, endocarditis, endometriosis, enteritis, epidemics, epididymitis, epilepsy, Epstein-Barr virus, erectile dysfunction (ED), excessive ear wax, fainting, fallen arches (flat foot), farsightedness (hyperopia), fevers, fibrillation, fibromyalgia, fibrosis, fistulas, flatulence, floods, frostbite, gallstones, ganglions, gangrene, gastrinomas, gastritis, gastroenteritis, germs, gingivitis, glaucoma, goiter, gonorrhea, gout, granuloma, Graves disease, halitosis, hallucinations, hay fever, headaches, heart attacks, heartburn, heart murmurs, hematomas, hemiplegia, hemophilia, hemorrhages, hemorrhagic fever, hemorrhoids, hepatitis (A,B&C), hernias, herniated and slipped disks, herpes, hiccups, high blood pressure (hypertension), HIV, hives, Hodgkin s disease, humpbacks (kyphosis), Huntington s chorea, hurricanes, hydrocephalus, hyperactivity, hypercholesterolemia, hyperemia, hyperglycemia, hyperthermia, hyperthyroidism, hypertonicity, hyperuricemia, hypochondria, hypoglycemia, hypothermia, hypothyroidism, impacted teeth, incontinence, indigestion (dyspepsia), infarctions, infections, infertility, infestations, inflammations, influenza, insanity, insomnia, iritis, irritable bowels, ischemia, itches, jaundice, Karposi s sarcoma, keratitis, keratosis, kidney failure, kidney stones, knock-knees, labor pains, laryngitis, Legionnaires disease, leprosy, lesions, lethargy, leukemia, lice, lipidosis, lipomas, liposarcoma, liver cancer, lockjaw/tetanus, lordosis, low blood pressure (hypotension), lumbago, lung cancer, lupus, Lyme disease, lymphangitis, lymphedema, lymphocytosis, lymphomas, macular degeneration, malaria, malocclusions, manias, mastitis, measles, melancholia, melanomas, meningitis, menorrhagia, menstrual cramps, mental illnesses, mental retardation, migraines, miscarriages (spontaneous abortions), mononucleosis, monsoons, morning sickness, multiple personality disorder, multiple sclerosis, multiple system atrophy, mumps, muscle cramps and spasms, muscular dystrophy, myalgia, myasthenia gravis, myelitis, narcolepsy, nausea, nearsightedness (myopia), necrosis, nephritis, nephrosis, nervous breakdowns, nervous tics, neuralgia, neuritis, neuroses, night blindness, nosebleeds, obesity, osteitis, osteodystrophy, osteoporosis, otitis, ovarian cancer, Paget s disease, pain, palsy, pancreatic cancer, paralysis, paranoia, parasitosis, Parkinson s disease, pericarditis, periodontitis, peritonitis, phantom pain, pharyngitis, phlebitis, phobias, pimples, pinched nerves, plagues, pleurisy, pneumonia, poisons, polio, Pott s disease, premature births, premenstrual syndrome (PMS).

  22. QUESTION:
    Can anyone help me with a sick baby bunny?
    I have a pet baby bunny, I can't figure out what is wrong with him. He is dringing water, urinating, but I can't get him to have a bowel movement. He is respondent, and moves around, but also seems tired or week. He is eating a little bit but not much. He seems to have some sort of a mucusy stuff on his bottom when he tries to have a bowel movement. I've seen no blood in anything.

    • ANSWER:
      You should take him to the vet immediatley. Something may be wrong with him inside, like cancer or something like that. Here are a few websites of illnesses bunnies may have:

      http://www.rabbitweb.net/health-problems.asp

      http://www.mismatch.co.uk/rabbithealth.htm

      http://www.ehow.com/how_16498_recognize-illness-rabbit.html

      Here is information that I found too;

      Myxomatosis - a Viral Infection of Rabbits

      Myxomatosis is a virus infection that causes puffy swellings around the eyes, symptoms generally leading to blindness, caused by infected fleas biting your rabbit. Sadly, even with nursing and medication nearly all infected rabbits will die from the disease. There is, however, a safe and effective vaccine available to prevent this disease.

      Overgrown Incisors - Overgrown Front Teeth in Rabbits

      Unless your rabbit receives the correct feeding regime it will be prone to the teeth not being worn down. The incisors may be ground down or even removed under anaesthetic. Overgrown molars can be filed but only under anaesthetic.

      Rabbit Skin Problems

      Ticks, Fleas, Mange, and Ear Mites can all infect rabbits. There are effective preventative treatments for all these. Abscesses obtained from fighting may require minor surgery or a course of antibiotics.

      Uterine Cancer in Rabbits

      Uterine cancer is a fairly common condition of older, unspayed, does. Treatment involves major surgery. Early spaying is a preventative method for this condition.

      Viral Haemorrhagic Disease in Rabbits

      Viral haemorrhagic disease is a deadly disease for rabbits. Symptoms of this deadly disease are loss of appetite, lethargy and nose bleeds. The virus can be transmitted from other animals, pet food, bedding and clothing. Most infected rabbits will die quite quickly of this disease. Again, there is an effective vaccine to prevent this disease.

      Mucoid Enteritis
      The symptoms of this illness are diarrhoea, weight loss, appetite loss and fever but little more is known about it. Mucoid enteritis occurs mostly in rabbits around two months old and in pregnant and lactating rabbits. It can also occur after a change in the rabbit's diet or in certain breeds which could indicate that it could be a hereditary disease. It is better to gradually introduce new foods to your rabbit and keep the rabbit in a constant even temperature as temperature change could be another factor. Your vet could provide antibiotics but it is better to try to prevent the problem.

      Hair balls
      When your rabbit cleans himself he will swallow small amounts of fur which do not often cause a problem because the fur will be digested with the other food. Sometimes due to less fibre in the diet the fur will accumulate into hair balls which can block the digestive tract. To prevent this, ensure your rabbit's diet is good and if you have a long haired rabbit, keep it regularly groomed to remove all the excess hair.

      Heatstroke

      Excessive heat is dangerous to rabbits so they must be kept away from radiators and direct sunlight. Keep the hutch well ventilated. If your rabbit pants severely, flops about maybe over one side and has no energy he could be suffering from heatstroke.

      Lumps

      If your rabbit has a lump it is unlikely to be cancerous. They are usually cysts or infected wounds. It is quite difficult to know if your rabbit has any bumps on the skin because unless you are stoking the rabbit the lumps are very difficult to see. Rabbits can get wounds from rusty nails working their way loose in the hutch and cheap straw and hay can often cause problems by being too coarse or containing harmful bits of wire or other objects. If you are worried, clean the wound with rabbit friendly antiseptic and contact your vet to see if your rabbit needs antibiotics.

      Malocclusion

      Malocclusion is a hereditary condition occurring when the teeth are misaligned. Rabbit's teeth grow constantly and if they are not aligned properly they will not wear down and this will prevent the rabbit from eating properly. Wild rabbits would starve to death with malocclusion and vets recommend that any baby rabbit born with the problem is put down to prevent the condition being passed on through breeding. If you have a rabbit with malocclusion you either have to have the teeth filed down every few weeks, this is very stressful for the rabbit, have the teeth taken out or have the rabbit put down. The options are not very good because if you have the teeth taken out you will have to feed your rabbit only soft food for the rest of his life.

      Myxomatosis

      This is probably the best known rabbit disease. Your rabbit must be vaccinated against this and VHD. Myxomatosis was introduced to wild rabbits to keep the numbers down and it is a deadly disease. It is spread by mosquitoes and the symptoms are: fever, weeping eyes, swellings on the face or genitals and listlessness. Myxomatosis can be cured if caught early but otherwise is fatal.

      Hope this helped and your bunny becomes OK.

  23. QUESTION:
    Mass found during ultrasound?
    I'm currently 12 weeks pregnant. When I was about 10 weeks pregnant, I started having severe pain in my lower abdomen, but no bleeding. I called my OB the next day and she ordered me to have an ultrasound. They checked the baby, and it's fine. So, pregnancy wise, I'm in the clear. But, when the tech was looking around for the ovaries and such, she found a pretty large (2x the size of my ovaries), perfectly circular white mass above and to the right of my uterus. It's not my ovaries. She found those, and they were fine. She didn't know what it was, so I had to wait for the OB to call me to let me know what they thought. I never got a call, so I called and spoke with the nurse. She said they still didn't have a definite answer, but the OB thinks it may be a blood filled cyst, or a hemorrhagic cyst. I'm supposed to have another ultrasound tomorrow at my 12 week check up. My question is does anyone have any idea what this is or if it's something dangerous or something I should even worry about? It still hurts when I stand up too fast or if I lift something heavier than a gallon of milk. I have a 16 month old daughter, and taking care of her is getting more and more painful.
    Thank you for your help, Angelbunny. Did you have to have it removed?
    Went to the OB today. She says it most likely is a cyst on my ovary after all. I have to have another ultrasound in 3 weeks to check on it. That's all that was said. So, I'm assuming that means it's nothing to worry about for now anyway.

    • ANSWER:


is a hemorrhagic cyst dangerous