Simple Ovarian Cyst

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between simple ovarian cyst and complex ovarion cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      Simple ovarian cysts are the most common, and complex ovarian cysts can be more serious. The main difference is that complex cysts are those that have both solid and liquid components, whereas simple just have fluid.

      Ovarian cysts can come and go throughout your lifetime, and there can be many causes, particularly around lifestyle, which is why when you're looking at treatments you need to take an holistic approach.

      Larger complex ovarian cysts will produce symptoms that will quickly become noticed, and the pain will be a lot worse than simple ones.

      The diagnosis of a complex ovarian cyst should not be taken lightly and any persistent or sudden pain in your abdomen or pelvis warrants thorough medical investigation.

  2. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    what are they? and umm how do you know if you have them???

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  3. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts?
    Hi everyone. I was diagnosed a few years ago with ovarian cysts, and I had the ultrasounds and all that jazz, but they went away. Now I'm having the same kinds of pains in my lower stomach (a lot of the time), mostly on my left side. My doctor told me last time that she didn't really see anything (back in Oct.) Is it possible that they're back? Or that they come and go as usual, but for some reason they're really painful for me?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations.

      Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you still experience pain that you go back to your OB/Gyn and let her know as there might be something else that could be causing this.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      Good luck :)

  4. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst?
    my dr visualized a 3.57cm cyst on my right ovary. she said she didnt think it was anything bad but is sending me for a CT of the abdomen and pelvis. i'm 21 y/o. isn't that kinda big? at what size does it need to be removed? thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Functional ovarian cysts usually go away without treatment. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimeters and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery), however in your case it might depend on whether you are experiencing any pain or discomfort because if you aren't, then your doctor may just want to "wait" to see whether it resolves on it's own.

      I would recommend that you speak with your doctor/gyno about this and ask her to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 9 years and have had surgery 2 times to have them removed because they were big in size (7cm and over 5cm) which caused me a lot of pain.

      I hope this helps ease your mind a little bit. Good luck :)

  5. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    what age is it common to get a cyst that does not want to go away on its own?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause (basically any woman can get ovarian cysts at any time), when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  6. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    about six months ago my 17 yr old daughter , was dx with ovarian cysts a 4 cm on the right side and small ones wich is normal on the left one, well she did the birth control thing she still is on those we have did the high dose small dose and in between wich is also normal to try to find the right one for her, well the 4cm went down to a normal size and the left side ones also went away , my question is she still has lots of pain yes controlled with pain meds if gets too bad and advil if minor, well now left side is hurting worse then right side , called doc they said she prob ovulating, well that should be over now and still pain, so here it is how long should I wait to see if birth control going to work to control cysts? and should I sternly ask for a ultrasound to see if she has a cyst on her left side ? not worried about smaller cysts those are normal and should not be causing this pain. BTW doc said she prob started getting cysts at a young age and just never noticed them before.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if your daughter is in severe pain that you take her back to the doctor or to the ER at the hospital, they will be able to do another ultrasound. I would recommend that you ask your doctor/gyno any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  7. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    has anyone had problems with ovarian cysts? how did you deal with it and what did you do to get rid of them? What were some of your symptoms? For two weeks I have been having cramping in my pelvic area and my lower back, nausea and vomited once, and some spotting today, and it also was painful during intercourse.... does any of that sound like it could be symptoms and should any of it be alarming?
    also i have been on bc pills for 5 years...

    • ANSWER:
      I suffer from ovarian cysts, and my best friend had one removed a year ago. For both of us it was quite a different experience so I'll break them down for you.

      Me:
      I had pain like you were describing, no vomiting, no spotting. My gynocologist did a sonogram, and placed me on birth control pills to help shrink the cysts. She said they will be recurrent but if they stay the way they are they will continue to respond to the bc and will not need to be surgically removed. It's been 1 year and I still have slight symptoms, but just had a check-up and the cysts remained small.

      My Best friend
      All of a sudden became very very ill feeling. She was vomiting nothing but bile every 5 minutes or so, had severe pains that caused her not to be able to move. Went to the ER, was examined, told about her cyst and told to follow-up with a GYN. The vomiting stopped happening so often, but she would still have days where she would vomit once or twice, had days where pain was soooo bad going to the bathroom was hard because she had to move. Her GYN also prescribed her birth control pills to shrink the cyst. The problem for her was that her cyst managed to grow while on the pills. They surgically removed the cyst about a year ago, and she's been fine ever since.

      It would be in your best interest to make an appointment with your gyno for a pelvic exam, and perhaps a sonogram. I hope you don't have an ovarian cyst... they suck, and are painful, even to do simple things like sneeze, cough, or go over a bump in a care, but luckily they are treatable either through surgery or bc pills. Good Luck! :-)

  8. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    has anyone had these and what were your symptoms..how bad was the pain

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns or think that you might have ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you see a gyno for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  9. QUESTION:
    I have a simple ovarian cyst?
    I have a simple ovarian cyst on my left ovary, that 's all my doctor told me I want to know more. Can you help

    • ANSWER:
      A simple ovarian cyst is generally a small collection of fluid on your ovary. Usually, they develop during ovulation and dissipate by the end of "ladies week." Unfortunately, they can sometimes burst which causes a great deal of pain. Nonetheless, they are completely benign.

      Since every woman is different, you should send your MD a message to ask what it means for you.

  10. QUESTION:
    How big are simple ovarian cysts?
    I had been having pain on my right side. I went to my ob/gyn she did an ultra sound. Told me I had two simple cyst, she said she didn't think that they were the cause of my pain. That was it! She wants to do another ultrasound in 3 months. I have had ovarian cysts in past that had to be removed.
    I went another ob/gyn for a second opinion. The second Dr. gave me birth control pills. I seem to have more pain when I take it, verses the days I forget to take it.

    • ANSWER:
      ...I don't know what she's talking about. They can definatly cause pain. Mine were the size of golf balls.....

      here's a site with good info. http://www.4woman.gov/faq/ovarian_cysts.htm

      Good luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    How to treat ovarian cyst except surgery?
    My ovarian cyst is over 5 cm and I am planning to be pregnent. So I do not want to hurt my body I will not choose surgery. Is there any other better treatment or I just let it along no need to treat at all. I heard that ovarian cyst can disappear by itself. Is it true?

    • ANSWER:
      In China, simple ovarian cyst is not considered a major medical problem.

      Treatments for ovarian cysts with Chinese medicine are considered a relatively easy matter if cysts are diagnosed in the first place. The herbal formula Moxa Attach Cyst Plaster http://nobleherb.com/goods-15.html is reported to be effective with short-term administration. Ovarian cysts are probably most-often treated secondarily and without separate diagnosis, as part of a syndrome of infertility, since some of the formulas used for infertility,

      For the most part, this formula promotes the blood circulation; it includes herbs to increase the qi and improve qi circulation, both in support of enhancing the blood circulation. Chinese doctors suggest that treatment with herbs should be undertaken before surgery, so that the tumor mass may be shrunken. This approach of delaying surgery may not be deemed acceptable in the West.

  12. QUESTION:
    question about ovarian cysts...?
    i know i have them.

    but sometimes when i feel the pain strike in my ovary. it also strikes at the same time kinda up higher in my stomach/chest

    im not quite sure where.

    but its really weird.

    i feel it at the same time
    and it feels like the pain is connected by a string or something.

    anyone else ever feel this?

    or know what it is?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations.

      Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  13. QUESTION:
    How to treat ovarian cyst?
    The doctor told me I had ovarian cyst. And also it is a little big,5.2*5.1cm need to do surgery.
    I just got married. I don't want to do surgery. But the doctor said it will influence the chance of having a baby.
    Is there any other treatment for ovarian cyst? Who knows how to treat ovarian cyst besides the surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      In China, simple ovarian cyst is not considered a major medical problem
      In China, simple ovarian cysts are most often treated with herbal combinations.
      The herbal treatments are reported to be very effective with a relatively short period of administration-about thirty days-though few details are given in the rare commentaries about this subject.
      Like Moxa Attach Cyst Plaster.

      For the most part, this formula promotes the blood circulation; it includes herbs to increase the qi and improve qi circulation, both in support of enhancing the blood circulation. Chinese doctors suggest that treatment with herbs (and, as may be appropriate chemotherapy) should be undertaken before surgery, so that the tumor mass may be shrunken. This approach of delaying surgery may not be deemed acceptable in the West.

  14. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst, cancer?
    My stomach pokes out, like there's pressure inside. I am not a big girl but my stomach feels bloated. I have sharp stabbing cramp like pains when it's no where near time for my period. I went to the doctor back in January and she found nothing. I'm thinking maybe the cyst went away at the time and now it is back. I'm on birth control and use a condom. Ive taken a blood and urine pregnancy test,I know that I am not pregnant. But it's very uncomfortable to have sex while feeling bloated. I'm 21 , if that matters. I just want this feeling to go away already

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cyst is not all cancer. To find out whether you have ovarian cyst you have to under go a simple ultrasound scan.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is it safe to get pregnant while having a simple ovarian cyst?
    through months of being infertile, and many medications., I finally have a follicle measuring 19mm ( 14 day cycle today), now my doctor says that since i have an ovarian cyst i shouldn't get pregnant and drink birth control for a month to get rid of the cyst.

    is it safe to just get pregnant while having a cyst.

    my cyst is a simple ovarian cyst, measuring 4.5cm

    • ANSWER:
      In general cysts have a medically diagnoised name.. you don't give one...

      Have a look at the following.

      Ovarian cysts that can affect your fertility include:
      Endometriomas. Endometriomas are cysts caused by endometriosis, a condition in which the tissue normally lining your uterus (endometrium) grows outside the uterus. These ovarian cysts do have a detrimental effect on fertility.
      Ovarian cysts resulting from polycystic ovaries. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition marked by many small cysts in your ovaries, irregular periods and high levels of certain hormones. PCOS does contribute to problems with fertility in some women.

      These types of ovarian cysts don't affect fertility:
      Functional cysts. Functional cysts are the most common type of ovarian cyst. Functional cysts form during a normal menstrual cycle and do not cause or contribute to infertility. In fact, functional cysts actually indicate that the necessary functions leading to fertility are taking place.
      Cystadenomas. These cysts are growths in the ovary that arise from the surface of the ovaries. Although they need treatment, they don't affect fertility.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/ovarian-cysts-and-infertility/AN01848
      for more info.

      Personally.. go for it. Very best of luck.

  16. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst question.....????????
    What do doctors do about an ovarian cyst if one is found?
    Surgery? Medicines? Just curious.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  17. QUESTION:
    Abnormal Complex Ovarian Cyst?
    Doc says my mom (43) has an Abnormal Complex Ovarian Cyst.

    What is this, where can I find more info, what will happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Abnormal ovarian cysts are very different from functional cysts since they have resulted from abnormal cell growth. However, that need not mean that they are all cancerous as most of them are simple benign growths. And none knows for sure what has caused them to grow. However, abnormal ovarian cysts that include cystadenoma cyst, dermoid cyst, endometrioma cyst or Chocolate cyst and 'polycystic ovarian cyst' are believed to occur due to imbalance of 'female hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and a multitude of other direct and indirect reasons. In many women, these cysts have remained all through their lives without the host being aware of their presence. But in some rare cases, they may burst, needing immediate surgical interference.

      Cystadenoma cysts

      These abnormal ovarian cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovaries and can grow to a very large size. Mucinous Cystadenoma cysts take the form of biggest tumours in women often weighing approximately 328 lb or around 149 kg, These cysts reportedly occur at an early age and the cyst turned tumour happens to be unilateral and are often found attached to the ovary by a stem. As there is a rare chance of these cysts or tumours turning malignant, they may be classified historically and treated accordingly. Falling under the category of asymptomatic cysts, they may be found in the form of large abdominal mass during a routine check up of a person complaining abdominal pain and associated distressing condition.

      Dermoid cyst or teratomas

      As a fairly bizarre phenomenon, Dermoid cysts, clinically termed as 'cystic teratoma' are classed more as tumours than cysts. In fact, they are solid structures filled with pieces of bone, hair, teeth and skin, as well as hair follicles, pockets of blood, sebum and in some cases 'thyroid tissue'. Though they are normally benign, the rarely occurring malignant dermoid cyst usually develops as 'squamous cell carcinoma' in adults. Incidentally, a Pilonidal cyst often resembles dermoid cyst in several ways, the most significant resemblance concern the presence of Germ Cell Tumour. In case of any evasive surgery care must be taken so that there is no spillage while the opinion of an oncologist will be helpful.

      Periorbital Dermoid Cysts

      Even the kids are not spared of Dermoid cysts - often kids get them close to the eyebrow's lateral aspect and they feel like rubber. When the cysts are seen, medical practitioners sometimes keep them under observation and at other times they are surgically removed. However when they are meddled with, the cysts may lead to an inflammation. And even after treatment, the cyst may make a comeback, particularly if the entire growth has not been removed. But the problem is, the complete cyst can often be difficult to remove with surgery, particularly when it is a 'Dumbbell Configuration', in which, it needs to be cut along the suture line of the skull.

      Endometrial cysts or Chocolate cysts

      Endometriosis is a medical terminology that indicates a condition when the endometrium or the lining of the womb begins to grow in parts of the body other than the womb. These endometrial patches also forms on the ovaries, creating cysts popularly known as Chocolate cysts as they are invariably filled with chocolate coloured pre-stored blood. During the menstrual period every month, these endometrial patches of tissues that have been encapsulated in cyst will also bleed, but since there is no outlet for bleeding, the cyst go on getting larger in size and eventually may burst.

      Polycystic ovarian cyst

      Cysts forming from small egg follicles causing ovaries to get thickened and enlarged, often accompanied by hormonal imbalance in women are known as polycystic ovarian cyst that grow in numbers.

      Holistic approach as plausible cure

      Since OTC medications and prescription drugs can hardly solve the problem of abnormal ovarian cysts in your body and surgical removal of the cyst involves many factors that may not prove beneficial, a holistic approach towards a plausible cure seems to be the best answer. You need also to remember that the surgical removal of a cyst is not foolproof since a recurrence can never be ruled out.

      The holistic approach to the cure is more practical too as the cyst formation involves a multitude of factors starting from hormonal imbalance to psychological trauma. Besides, the holistic approach will add newer dimension towards the treatment that includes change of food habits, change of lifestyle and appropriate physical exercise, topics hitherto unheard of as right line of treatment for abnormal ovarian cysts.

  18. QUESTION:
    question about simple ovarian cyst?
    3 months ago i had a abdominal hysterectomy(uterus and cervix removed) plus they removed a simple ovarian cyst on right ovary,it came back on same ovary and 3 months before the hysterectomy i had the same thing which a differant doctor drained it(point is) every 3 months i get a cyst only on rite ovary it's removed but comes back,i go see the doc on the 23rd and was wondering would the returning cyst's be good enough cause to have ovary's removed? i am 36 and smoke so birth controll is not an option.

    • ANSWER:
      I'd say that sounds like enough to go ahead and get rid of the ovaries. I've had a couple ovarian cysts. They are horribly painful. I can't imagine knowing I'd have one that often.

      While you're at the whole health thing, try quitting smoking. It is so dangerous. I am not going to preach to you or lecture you. You know the dangers of it. Just try to understand that it can happen to you. A lot of people think that it just won't happen to them. It's also not a good way of dealing with your stress. Try exercising. The nicotine replacement products really help, too. Just try. It's for your own good.

  19. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts...?
    I've been having pain on my right side for a few months and finally asked my doctor about it...she scheduled me for an ultrasound which I had a couple days ago. My doctor just called and said that they saw that my right ovary was enlarged and they saw a lot of follicles (?) that they said were probably a bunch of ovarian cysts. They want to do another ultrasound in 6 weeks...I'm really scared...What does this mean? If they are all cysts, what do they do? And what does that mean for me? Will I have problems getting pregnant?? My doctor didn't really help so I have no idea where to ask these questions...I'm scared. =

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you speak to your doctor and ask her for a referal to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  20. QUESTION:
    i want to know if septated cysts can lead to ovarian cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Simple ovarian cysts are very rarely cancerous - various types of simple cysts are quite common during the childbearing years.

      "Septated" means that the cyst is divided into segments. The significance of this is partly in how thick the walls ("septa") are between the parts. A thicker wall is thought to be a higher risk of being malignant, as is a complex cyst (which has solid and non-solid areas in it). Usually when there is a simple cyst, another ultrasound will be done in month, whereas with a complex one they would remove it and evaluate it for ovarian cancer. It sounds like in your case, not knowing which it is, my recommendation would be to get it checked if u have one

  21. QUESTION:
    Signs of Ovarian Cysts?
    My mom had cysts on her overies and I think I may have one. What are the signs?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno so they can do an ultrasound to have a look at your ovaries and you can ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  22. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a doctor appt. next week, bt just wondering if this sounds like one. Very irregular periods, almost certain i am not pregnant, painful sex, bloating, sharp pains and cramping in lower left side of my stomach. just wondering if this sounds like I may have a cyst? thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have them also and here is some information that helped me

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.
      What causes ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.
      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).
      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?

      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

  23. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst???
    can anyone explain to me what they are?
    personal experiences with them are also helpful!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      In really simple terms...when its time for your body to ovulate, your ovary starts getting several eggs ready to be dropped into your uterus. Your body selects the best one to get dropped and the other eggs are instructed to self destruct. Something happens to that signal and instead the egg's membrane sac keeps growing bigger and bigger and forms a cyst.

      Lots of women have them and don't even know it. I had one that got as big as 6.5 cms across and it landed me in the emergency room in severe pain. The cyst was leaking (aka hemorrhagic cyst). I've heard the pain is even worse if the cyst ruptures suddenly.

      I ended up needing to get my ovary removed because the cyst had twisted the ovary and cut off the blood supply but that's a pretty rare complication.

  24. QUESTION:
    What exactly is an ovarian cyst?
    please explain to me what it is, i just know it causes pain
    egg? this is for my friend, she's a virgin. ^_^
    thanks, and yeah, i figured out the cyst on ur ovary part, i meant like what exactly are they, what causes them and all. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  25. QUESTION:
    What is an ovarian cyst?
    I'm just wondering, and is it common among 13-15 year old girls?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  26. QUESTION:
    what is an ovarian cyst???
    izi dangerous nd how do u get it???

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  27. QUESTION:
    I was diagnosed with Complex Ovarian Cyst?
    Okay so I went to the hospital 2 weeks ago going on 3. I was diagnosed with complex ovarian cyst. So the next day I go to the ob/Gyn and he said there should be nothing to worry about that the cyst had ruptured and that's why I was in so much pain that it will leave by itself fast since the fluid is coming out. Well I still have a lot of pain on my right side. Should I get a second opinion? He didn't give me antibiotics. Was he suppose to? Please help me out. I just wanna know if I should take this seriously or wait till the pain goes away! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Complex ovarian cyst just means it's a little more than a simple cyst. A simple cyst is just a single bag of fluid. A complex cyst might have blood or clot in it, or septations dividing it into smaller compartments, or solid components.

      Cysts can cause a lot of pain sometimes when they rupture. You should not need antibiotics, as they are not usually due to infections.

      However, most doctors I work with want to follow up a cyst, especially if complex, just to make sure it goes away. They usually do this in 2-3 months. Since you're still having a lot of pain, I'd call him up and let him know. He will probably do another ultrasound just to make sure things are ok. Good luck.

  28. QUESTION:
    what is ovarian cyst?
    what causes ovearian cyst ?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  29. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst?
    I was told I have an ovarian cyst and I was wonderind what was some of the symptoms cause I'm always really weak feeling no energy and I was wondering could the cyst be causeing it?

    • ANSWER:
      The Cyst-Clopedia: Everything You Always Wanted to Know
      by Robert B. Albee, MD

      Women are often told, "Don t worry about it, it s just a cyst," but they are also told, "I m concerned, you ve got a cyst." How do you know what s what? Dr. Albee provides an encyclopedia of information about many types of cysts.
      Introduction
      A cyst is a spherical area in any organ in which an outer wall encloses a type of tissue of a different consistency than the normal tissue. In most cases, the cyst wall encloses a softer or more liquid tissue. If the growth is solid it is called a tumor or neoplasm.

      Ovarian Cysts
      Within the ovary itself there are well over a dozen different types of cysts. There are many descriptive terms used to categorize these cysts. Some of these include:

      Functional Cysts
      Functional cysts are the result of normal processes within the ovary and are self-limiting. Each ovulation a woman has is accompanied by a follicle cyst and then a corpus luteum cyst. At the end of each cycle they are expected to completely resolve.

      Simple Cysts
      These cysts may be functional or not. When seen on ultrasound, they have a single cavity without the echoes that indicate compartments within the cyst.

      Complex Cysts
      These cysts have more than one compartment within them and are less likely to be functional.

      Hemorrhagic Cysts
      This term refers to any cyst felt to have blood or clots within it. This term can be linked with another, such as when some bleeding occurs within a corpus luteum cyst, and the result is called a hemorrhagic corpus luteum.

      Fixed Cysts
      These cysts are not freely moveable. This immobility suggests that they are involved with adhesions or have attached themselves to adjacent structures.

      Dermoid Cysts
      These cysts are a type of nonfunctional, benign cyst. Their actual name is "benign cystic teratoma." These cysts may have hair, teeth, and fat in them. They are formed in embryo and should be removed but are rarely harmful. They can almost always be removed while preserving some portion of healthy ovary.

      Endometriomas
      These cysts are caused by endometriosis in the ovary or other tissues. The cyst wall has endometrial glands in it. As these cysts progress they frequently produce a thick dark material the consistency of fudge syrup trapped inside. Thus they have been given the name "chocolate cyst."

      Treating Functional Cysts
      If a functional cyst is found but isn t causing symptoms, it is usually just observed. Sometimes pain or long duration forces us to try to hasten its resolution. Anything that prevents ovulation or turns off estrogen and progesterone production should help. Oral contraceptives are the most common treatment.

      What if it Ruptures?
      Ruptures may result in various experiences. They may go unnoticed or they may be associated with sudden, often intense, pain. Because the cyst contents are normal body fluids (like follicle fluid), this spillage is not harmful. The body naturally absorbs and removes these fluids. Even blood is generally removed without a problem, although usually more slowly than other fluids.

      When Should I Worry?
      Any cyst that does not behave like a functional cyst should be evaluated further so that serious problems like cancer can be ruled out. Criteria possibly indicating the need for further evaluation include family history, symptomatology, size, duration, complexity, and mobility.

      These criteria are evaluated in the following ways:

      Patient-physician communication provides important history regarding the family and the patient's symptoms.
      Pelvic examination provides the initial estimates of size, tenderness, and mobility.
      Ultrasound and/or CT scans (occasionally MRI) provide some details regarding size, complexity, and mobility.
      Repeat exam after intervals of time provide information regarding duration.

      Then What?
      Once the physician determines that a cyst is probably not functional, exact information must be obtained. Although sometimes a needle guided aspiration will provide the needed information, it does not allow for treatment at the same time. In most cases diagnostic laparoscopy is recommended. This allows for visual inspection, tissue biopsy (frozen section) if needed and, in most cases, definitive treatment all at the same time.

      How Are Ovarian Cysts Treated?
      There are several approaches to treating an ovarian cyst:

      Aspiration - A cyst may be treated by simply draining the fluid out. This technique does not remove the cyst wall and frequently allows the cyst to reform over a period of time.

      Aspiration plus cyst wall ablation - This form of treatment adds the use of some form of energy such as electrical current (cauterization, fulguration), or laser to destroy the cyst wall after the aspiration is done. Its limitation is the inability to determine when the entire wall has been completely destroyed. In my opinion, when a vigorous attempt is made to destroy the wall of a cyst using this technique, it tends to cause additional tissue destruction to the normal areas of ovary surrounding the cyst.

      Excision - This form of treatment involves totally removing the entire cyst wall by cutting it out of the ovary. This can be accomplished by using cautery, sharp scissors dissection, or laser cutting (not to be confused with laser ablation). In rare cases after excision, suturing of the ovary is required to restore its normal shape, but this is not common. Excision is my preference for treating endometriosis of the ovary. It has by far the lowest risk of recurrence.

      Oophorectomy - Removal of the ovary is rarely required to remove a benign cyst. It is still the recommended form of treatment for all malignant cysts.

      Is Biopsy a Treatment?

      No!

      Ovaries and Adhesions

      Adhesions are the method the body uses to isolate injury, infection, and certain types of irritants to the peritoneal surfaces, such as blood or cancer cells.

      The ovary may be the source of the problem, or it may be an innocent bystander. Pelvic infection may come from the tubes and involve the ovaries, or be secondary to a different type of pelvic surgery, such as for a tubal pregnancy. The ovary itself can spill contents that create adhesions, such as blood, fat (from a dermoid), or chocolate from an endometrioma.

      If an ovary is stuck to another organ, we can often tell the source of the problem, especially with active endometriosis. Certain patterns and types of adhesions also suggest certain causes. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is almost always bilateral and generalized, as opposed to unilateral and focal. Sometimes we can match a patient's known history of infection or previous surgeries with her adhesions. This can help eliminate some possible causes for the scarring.

      For more information about scarring, please see the CEC newsletter about Adhesions.

      Cancers are almost always immediately visible and obvious.

      Although this article has only touched on some aspects of cysts, I hope we've helped you sort through some of the possibilities you may face.

      Source(s):

      Dr. Robert Albee, Center for Endometriosis Care, www.centerforendo.com

  30. QUESTION:
    Is this a sign of ovarian cyst?
    I have also been experencing gas and slight pain in my hands and shoulders
    Pain in the legs up and down and cramping on the right ovaries that all im having right now.is that a symptom help
    Pain in my right ovaries
    It not those kind of pains it kinda aches
    Yup u cant walk with a cyst
    just had my period 5 days ago

    • ANSWER:
      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  31. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts?
    I have had that stabbing pain on both sides before. then like a month later it was only on one side. And I do not have that pain anymore. I do have Extreme pain during the first day or two of my period that seems to increase and last longer as i get older. Now i only have pain that occurs every month or so that feels like that pain that you get when you've been running for awhile. Is this anything serious or could it be simple pain?

    • ANSWER:
      you should definatly go see your doctor..I was having alot of problems with pain..and it turned out to be ovarian cysts. Dont wait, just go! Good Luck!!!

  32. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts??????
    I went to the ER in August b/c I was having an early miscarriage. They did an ultrasound to confirm the miscarriage (which was a blighted ovum), and found I had a 21mm cyst on my right ovary (which made sense b/c I was having sharp shooting pains in my right side). They said it was small and functional and not to worry about it since there were no masses. Got my period in normal time and everything was back to normal (no pains). My second cycle post-miscarriage was really weird. When I ovulated it was late and I had severe bloating and cramping the evening I ovulated, then it went away, but for the 2 weeks before my period I had weird symptoms that made me think I was pregnant (breasts got huge, felt sick to my stomach, etc). And when I did get my period I felt a little throbbing on my right side for the 1st day or so. Then it went away. My 3rd post-miscarriage period started last night, and I have felt some little jabs in my right side, but they have gone away this morning. I should mention I've been to my OBGyn twice in the last 4 weeks as well as the ER (there was no pain but I was just worrying myself sick b/c I tend to obsess about this kind of stuff and I wanted to be seen asap) and had 3 pelvic exams and was told everything was completely normal and my ovaries felt totally normal and not to worry. But I can't help worrying... do you think the cyst they found on the ultrasound went away and these are all different cysts? Could I have had these all my life and never known? Some info on me that may help- I'm 29, have an 18-month-old son, weigh 130 pounds. Hubby and I will start trying for #2 in a few weeks so I just want to make sure everything is good to go!
    Thanks everyone- I really already know all the info that is out there on the internet about cysts- I really just want to hear personal stories from other women who have had them- thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).In the US ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts

      Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated.

      There are also types of other ovarian cysts you caould of been missed diagnoised with functional-more info here-
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst

      Symptoms
      Some or all of the following symptoms may be present, though it is possible not to experience any symptoms:

      Dull aching, or severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen (one or both sides), pelvis, vagina, lower back, or thighs; pain may be constant or intermittent -- this is the most common symptom
      Fullness, heaviness, pressure, swelling, or bloating in the abdomen
      Breast tenderness
      Pain during or shortly after beginning or end of menstrual period
      Irregular periods, or abnormal uterine bleeding or spotting
      Change in frequency or ease of urination (such as inability to fully empty the bladder), or difficulty with bowel movements due to pressure on adjacent pelvic anatomy
      Weight gain
      Nausea or vomiting
      Fatigue
      Infertility
      Increased level of hair growth
      Increased facial hair or body hair

      Treatment
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. [citation needed]

      Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:

      pain relievers, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain.NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain.
      a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation.
      chamomile herbal tea (Matricaria recutita) can reduce ovarian cyst pain and soothe tense muscles.
      urinating as soon as the urge presents itself.
      avoiding constipation, which does not cause ovarian cysts but may further increase pelvic discomfort.
      in diet, eliminating caffeine and alcohol, reducing sugars, increasing foods rich in vitamin A and carotenoids (e.g., carrots, tomatoes, and salad greens) and B vitamins (e.g., whole grains).
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
      Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

  33. QUESTION:
    how will they treat my ovarian cyst?
    Some background- I had my right ovary removed 2 years ago due to a large borderline malignancy tumor. I am 24. I had an ultrasound 6 months ago that showed a 4cm simple cyst.

    Since then, I'd been having pelvic discomfort, heavier than normal periods and cramping, constipation, dizziness, short bouts of nausea, full feeling in my abdomen and just general discomort and occasional paid there.

    At my follow up with my oncologist, she ordered another ultrasound which I had today, and it showed a 6cm cyst on the ovary. The tech said it looked like it had some blood in it, but didn't comment much on it after that other than saying I needed to call my doc and get an appointment scheduled and if I feel sharp pain in that area to go to the ER because it could have twisted.

    Anyone been in this situation? How was it treated? All this is with being on the pill, by the way. Did you just wait and see, did you have surgery?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are relatively common, and 6 cm is not as large as you would think, they can be much larger. Many times, the cyst will regress on it's own, or they will do a fine-needle aspiration (drain the cyst). It is a minor procedure. Your doctor may choose not do the procedure if he/she feels the cyst is not dangerously large.

      Yes, you should be paying attention to the pain in your pelvis, and go to/call the doctor if there are any sudden changes (an intense sharp pain, or if the pain completely subsides).

  34. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts???? HELPP?
    so im pretty sure i have ovarian cysts i have a dull ache on both sides of my abdominal area and its not like a killing pain but i can definatel feel it and it comes off and on ive also felt some aching in my lower back and vaginal area but just ocassionally ive also kind of felt a little dizzy and had slight head aches from time to time are those symptoms of ovarian cysts?? i went to my doctor and everything and we scheduled a pelvic ultrasound oh yeah ive had some slight pelvis pain as well helppp meeee!! does it sound like cysts to you??

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional, hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts) over the past 10 years. And I have even needed surgery for 2 of them because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles).

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      It does sound to me like you could have an ovarian cyst, I have experienced the same type of symptoms you are describing except for the dizzy feeling, however the only way to know for sure is to find out by having an ultrasound (which you're having soon). I would recommend that if you do have an ovarian cyst, that you ask your doctor/gynaecologist lots of questions with regards to it, such as what type of cyst is is, is it a simple cyst (such a as functional (fluid-filled) cyst) or a complex cyst (such as hemmorhagic cyst)? As your doctor/gyno how big it is and what they would recommend such as waiting to see whether it resolve on it's own within a few cycles, whether your doctor/gyno may recommend you take the pill for a couple of months to see whether that helps resolve the cyst or whether you may need to have the cyst surgically (laparoscopy) drained/removed.

      Good luck :)

  35. QUESTION:
    Simple ovarian cyst now complex - please help?
    Hi
    I am 37 and on HRT (prometrium for progesterone and Vivelle DOT patch for estrogen) due to bone marrow transplant at age 19 and menopause due to the chemotherapy at age 19 for the bone marrow transplant (I had CML). I had a simple ovarian cyst 3.5cm in April of this year and follow up in July says it is now a complex cyst (4.6cm with some internal debris that look like little floaters to me and a very thin septation that looks like a line in the middle but not actually separating. I don't believe any papillary nodules were noted and I don't believe blood flood was noted to the cyst). The cyst was found by vaginal ultrasound. I had my CA125 done which was 13.
    I have terrible anxiety (to the point of almost not being able to function) over any medical related things that could be cancer. My gyno. sent me to a gyno/onco. who examined me and read the report from my regular gyno. He said he did not feel this was cancer but wanted to go ahead and do the CA125 test (result was 13) and has me scheduled for a CAT scan as well. I have convinced myself this is cancer and am so very scared. I know CA125 can be in the normal range for 20% of women who end up actually having ovarian cancer.
    My question is, when a cyst that started out as simple and turns complex, is this change usually due to cancer?
    Thanks for any info.!

    • ANSWER:
      Hmmm. That's rough! I totally understand where you're coming from--I had ovarian cancer when I was 19, so I know the fear you're feeling. I periodically had ovarian cysts after that, over the years, all sparking great alarm. All went away... Until I got a complex cyst when I was 33, and it had multiple septations. All the docs were sure it was cancer again. so I had surgery to remove my ovary. And it was... Benign! so certainly it's possible yours is benign. It's probably most likely it's benign. It's just that it has to be checked out more than a simple cyst does. Try to think of these tests as ways to ensure you're healthy, not as ways to reveal sickness. It's still most likely you're fine

  36. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    What is the normal size of an ovarian cyst? And how large does it have to be before it is considered abnormal? Also what does it mean if fluid is seen when you have an ultrasound done ?

    • ANSWER:
      Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed. Ovarian cysts have nothing to do with disease. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment.
      A woman may develop 1 or more of them.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst.

  37. QUESTION:
    What to expect with Ovarian Cyst?
    I just went to a family practice Dr. (not my normal OB/GYN) for what I thought was a bladder infection. Turns out I have an ovarian cyst on my right ovary. I am going in for an unltra-sound on Wednesday. Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What should I expect as far as care/treatment? What are the chances it is cancerous? A bit worried about the future and confused as to what to expect, any info you have to offer is greatly appreciated.
    I had an ultra-sound today, the cyst is an inch in diameter and fluid filled. They called it a simple cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss your options with your doctor/OB/Gyn and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I'm currently using birth control pills to treat and try to prevent my ovarian cysts from recurring, however I have a simple cyst that is 3.2cm at the moment, meaning that the birth control pills does not always help to stop cysts from coming back.

      If you have any other questions, you can email me - the link to my email is in my profile. I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  38. QUESTION:
    Are ovarian cyst normal?
    Less than a month ago, i got a cat scan that showed an ovarian cyst. It seemed as though the doctors shrugged it off but i'm having some weird symptoms. What i want to know is how are doctors, radiologists able to determine if a cyst is cancerous or not? I dont have any trust because a long time ago i knew someone and the doctors told him it was just a cyst and it turned out to be cancer and he's not here anymore. :(

    Sometimes i can feel soreness in the area of the cyst. How will it go away or how long should it take to go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are not uncommon in young women in their teens and twenties. There are two types of cysts, simple and complex. Simple cysts are basically just sacs of fluid on your ovaries that form when you try to ovulate. Every woman forms a small cyst on her ovary that bursts during ovulation, releasing that month's egg. For some women the sac doesn't burst, it just keeps getting bigger and bigger, and that is an ovarian cyst.

      Complex cysts are more, well, complex, as the name would suggest. They are usually made up of body tissues, and are more likely to be cancerous. Some complex cysts actually have teeth, fingernails, etc. as part of the mass... crazy, huh? But they are much less common, and even if the cyst is complex it's unlikely to be cancerous.

      If your doctor shrugged off the cyst as being nothing then it is probably because it is a simple cyst, which are never cancerous because they are not made of body tissue but are just a sac of fluid that will eventually either reabsorb into the ovary or rupture. If the cyst was complex on the CT scan they would have taken a biopsy to see if it was cancerous or not. Simple cysts do not require a biopsy.

      However, if you are having pain and your doctor is not paying attention to your pain or giving you any options for treatment, then I would suggest you get a second opinion from another doctor. If you aren't already on it, birth control pills can shrink current cysts and prevent cysts from forming in the future. Aside from that though, there isn't much you can do about a cyst other than wait for it to reabsorb into the body or rupture. Rupturing is extremely painful so I hope for your sake that it just reabsorbs. If you are in significant pain though and the cyst has not ruptured, then sometimes they will surgically drain the cyst.

      Tell your doctor about the pain you're having and ask them what your options are. If they will not explain everything in thorough detail to you and give you options, then find a new doctor. They are employed by you, they should take care of you and answer all of your questions. If they aren't doing that then they aren't being a good employee and it is totally within your right as the patient to "fire" your doctor and get a new one. Good luck!

  39. QUESTION:
    Information on Ovarian Cysts...?
    I have several ovarian cysts on my right side, all quite small, and 1 abnormally large on my left. One recently ruptured on my right side and caused me severe pain. I saw several doctors and went to 2 different hospitals b4 i finally found out what had happened. I just want to prevent this from happening again, and I want to be more prepared.
    Are there any precautions I can take? and is it true that I may have fertility issues? i want kids, but i don't want to bring children into this world if they are going to have any sort of mental disability, i don't think it's fair. finally if there are any physical restrictions i should be aware of, it would be a great help! or if there is anything additional, please add it, all help is great!
    Thanks soooo much!

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 11 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      A functional ovarian cyst (or two) probably will not give you problems conceiving, however, if it is recommended that you need surgery to remove a cyst, you can talk about your future pregnancy plans with your surgeon, who can help you understand exactly what is to be done, and what the impact might be. A woman can be fertile with only one ovary, or with even one part of an ovary. Referral to a fertility specialist may be in order depending on your own unique situation and your age.

      I recommend that if you have any concerns regarding your ovarian cysts and have any of the symptoms as listed above, that you speak to your doctor and ask her for a referral to see a gynaecologist (who specialises in female reproductive health) for further evaluation. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and can twist or rupture causing intense pain and sometimes turning into an emergency.

      Good luck :)

  40. QUESTION:
    What is complex ovarian cyst in simple terms ?
    My gf has complex ovarian cyst and it's her lower right quadrant close to her ovary I just want to understand what's going on .. She's been hiding this and I just want some closure and understand whats going on she is going to have surgery

    • ANSWER:
      Complex ovarian cysts have both solid and liquid components. Check out the link below, as it explains all of the types very plainly.

  41. QUESTION:
    ovarian cysts..???
    so ive had this ongoing probleme for the past 6 months. my vulva is reallly itchy, and around my clitoris too. kinda on the rim of my vagina gets itchy sometimes too. its not yeast, and i test negative for STD's etc,
    im not sexually active.
    i have alot of discharge, but it seems to be normal looking, doesn't smell bad or anything.
    sometims i think discharge is coming from my clitoris because it's high up in my underwear, but my doctor said no, but i dont remember getting dishcarge there.
    i went to italy this summer and i shared bathingsuits alot... could it be from that?
    it doesnt hurt when i pee, and i can remember sometimes i get reallly bad aches kinda where my pelvic bone is.........
    plesae give suggestions!
    i'm going to a dermatologist for it because it's nothing inside of me..
    should i see a gyno instead

    • ANSWER:
      The itching may just be the skin's normal reaction to an overly moist environment, since you say you have a lot of discharge. It sounds like you have checked for and not found any signs of infection, so it may be as simple as trying different types of underwear (cotton is best) until it subsides.

      The aches you describe could possibly be your ovaries, but there are also other things it could be. If you are having persistent pain there (i.e. more than a few times a month as during normal ovulation) or you suspect you might have a problem with ovarian cysts, you should ask your OB/GYN or see a reproductive endocrinologist

  42. QUESTION:
    If you have an ovarian cyst...?
    Can It delay a person's growth, and when I say growth I mean getting taller, if the patient is 14?
    also if once the cyst is removed or goes away, will you grow the inches you didn't while the cyst was there?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own) and have a number of ovarian cysts rupture over the years causing intense pelvic pain.

      Ovarian cysts are usually a common and harmless swelling of one or both ovaries. These cysts most often occur in women who are between puberty and menopause, when the ovaries are in high gear propelling out mature eggs. The term functional means the cyst is not caused by any underlying disease or disorder, and that it will possibly resolve (shrink and disappear) on its own in a few weeks.

      Some functional ovarian cysts have no symptoms and are discovered, if at all, during routine pelvic exams. Others can cause symptoms, including changes in the menstrual cycle, including shorter or longer periods, skipped periods, and/or spotting between periods, pelvic pain or ache, especially during sexual intercourse or at the start or finish of menstruation, feelings of nausea or queasiness or breast tenderness.

      I am not aware of ovarian cysts delaying a woman's growth and stop you from growing.

      I would recommend if you have an ovarian cyst or think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with a doctor for further evaluation and ask him to answer any further questions you might have.

      Good luck :)

  43. QUESTION:
    What exactly is an ovarian cyst?
    and what causes them? are they easy to get rid of?
    do guys get cysts any where on their body?

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  44. QUESTION:
    I might have an ovarian cyst?
    I might have a cyst on my ovaries, and I have a ultrasound next week and am scared. What if it finds something else? Has anyone ever had an ovarian cyst before?

    • ANSWER:
      some cysts are very simple but some could be dangerous - discover everything about ovarian cysts - see below

  45. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between an ovarian follicle and an ovarian cyst?
    I am a 45 year old woman who had a partial (uterus removed) hysterectomy at age 32. I have been having symptoms of PCOS. I had an ultrasound done and it showed I have a complex follicle on my right ovary. It is 3x2x1 cm. What is the difference between a follicle and a cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      This is not a simple answer because the language around follicles and cysts is somewhat confused.

      In the normal scheme of things, a follicle (containing an ovum or egg) starts to develop during the middle of your cycle. It migrates to the edge of your ovary (perhaps 2cm in diameter at that time) and delivers the ovum to your Fallopian tube.

      A cyst is a fluid filled sac, which pretty much describes a follicle too. But in PCOS, follicle development is impeded and what can (but not always) result is an ovary with many small cysts (which are follicles which failed to develop properly and failed to deliver their ova). These cysts tend to be small (less than 1cm). Meanwhile, a regular ovarian cyst (there are various types) are fluid filled bodies which are larger in size (often 2cm or bigger).

      It sounds like your have some sort of abnormal ovarian cyst or follicle, but it doesn't sound like a PCOS type cyst. No need to be stressed, in the vast majority of cases such cysts are benign. And in most cases, they go away of their own accord. But if you get severe pain plus fever combined with nausea or vomitting, then go straight to ER, as this would indicate that the cyst has ruptured.

  46. QUESTION:
    does a ovarian cyst mimick pregnancy symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  47. QUESTION:
    Can a simple ovarian cyst turn into a complex cyst?
    I was recently referrered to specialists after having abdominal and pelvic pains and irregular periods.
    My report said my left ovary contains a 3.3cm simple cyst, and there was a trace of free fluid in the left adnexa and POD.
    What does this all mean!? Can it turn to a complex cyst??
    Im currently waiting to go back to the city where i live as im staying at my parents after nose surgery last week, so I will eventually go back to my doctors but im just curious for the time being.

    • ANSWER:
      It means that the cyst will probably rupture in the near future, adding to the fluid you already have. I am sure it can turn into a complex cyst, but I would suspect it won't. It may not even rupture, it may just shrink and go away. cysts are finicky things and have a mind of their own.

  48. QUESTION:
    Surgery for ovarian cysts?
    I have got ovarian cyst at least for one year. It has not become bigger until now. Its size is still 5.2*5.1.
    What should I do? How to treat it? must do surgery? Oh,I do not want this. Somebody help me!

    • ANSWER:
      To prevent deterioration, you had better treat your ovarian cyst as soon as possible.
      If you would not like to do surgery, you can choose Chinese conservative treatment of ovarian cyst.

      Ovarian cyst is a common disease in China. Chinese patients always choose Moxa Attach Cyst Plaster to treat ovarian cyst.

      Its usage is simple. Just apply the Moxa Attach Cyst Plaster on the lower abdomen navel and the back of your waist. its effect is obvious, about one month later the cyst will disappear.

      If you trust Chinese medical skill, please go to, http://nobleherb.com/goods-15.html

      Wish you recover asap.
      Good luck.

  49. QUESTION:
    what should I do for this ovarian cyst?
    Last month after my period is when the pain began, and didn't leave for a week...I went and saw a doctor and he gave me meds it went to away he said it was an infection...this month right after my period the pain again started and its already been a week and I'm still hurting...I went to the er yesterday and they said its just a cyst it'll go away...he also said see a specialist...if it was a normal cyst shouldnt have been gone before this month's period? I'm scared I'm only 18 and I'm in a lot of pain...I'm going to see a specialist but can anyone give me any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      ovarian cysts could be caused by a variety of reasons, what is important in diagnosing and managing them is what they are made of. some of them are the oocyte, or the egg, that has gotten too big, they go away after two months and are called functional cysts.

      Some are caused by the period blood washing back to the ovaries and accumulating and creating a cyst, they are called endometrioma, and are very painful, but benign cyst that need to be extracted surgically and the patient needs to take meds.

      other cysts are benign and malignant cysts, which could be differentiated by a simple sonography done by a specialist.

      However, in your age malignant ones are almost impossible to be the case, so don't worry about them!

      I think you might have endometriosis, your doctor will tell you and give you the proper meds, it is very common actually.

      Hope I helped!

      Also, the other answerer must be confusing ovarian cysts with something else, because they don't just pop!!!!! if that happens you will develope severe peritonitis and require urgent operation!!!

  50. QUESTION:
    Large Ovarian Cyst.....?
    I have a large ovarian cyst... 9cm x 9.5cm. I have surgery on Tuesday to remove it. The doctor said it appeared to be a simple cyst, non-septated and no free fluid.
    She said not to worry about cancer and the risk is small, she even said I could take birth control pills to see if it went away. I said no, I want it out of me now... (I've known about this for a month)

    My question is: have any of you been through anything like this? I'm 29, have had 3 children via c-section, my tubes are tied... so she is going to do a laparotomy because she said it would be hard to do the microscope through the incision scars.

    Just any comments. :) I'm doing nothing but googling ovarian cancer because I'm sooooo paranoid.

    • ANSWER:
      ok here's what I know:

      Ovarian Cancer usually happens to women who do not have their period any more, and they are usually over age 60. Most women who have had ovarian cancer have never had children, breast fed, and I here that taking birth control prevents ovarian cancer. My cousin had ovarian cysts and she is only 23. It's normal to be scared, trust me I get paranoid when my stomach hurts, I automatically think its cancer. LoL, your chances are very low, don't worry I promise you there is not one doubt in my mind that its cancer. Also... if your doctor is not worried then you shouldn't be either...

      GooD LuCk to you and GoD BleSS!


simple ovarian cyst

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