What Are The Symptoms For Ovarian Cysts X-ray

Best Selling Rayban Sunglasses

Cats 5000Cats
5000
Buy Now

Folding WayfarersFolding
Wayfarers
Buy Now

Erika RoundErika
Round
Buy Now

Flat Top BoyfriendFlat Top
Boyfriend
Buy Now

Large Metal AviatorsLarge
Aviators
Buy Now


Ray Ban RB3025 Aviator Sunglasses

Ray Ban RB3025 Aviator Sunglasses
Buy Now

Ray Ban is known for two distinct styles - wayfarers and aviators. I've decided to review one of each type. When it comes to aviators, the Ray Ban RB3025 Aviator sunglasses are the top model.

Ray Ban RB3025 Aviator Sunglasses

These glasses have almost 500 reviews on Amazon and got five stars. They have a metal frame and crystal lenses coated in 100% UV protection. If gold isn't your style, you may choose another color from the dozens of choices available.

Rayban Aviator Sunglasses

0RB3491Buy Now

RJ9506SBuy Now

0RB3025-58/135Buy Now

RB3025Buy Now

Aviator Small MetalBuy Now


Ray Ban RB4105 Wayfarer Sunglasses

Ray Ban RB4105 Wayfarer Sunglasses
Buy Now

Wayfarers were a popular style in the 1960's and 1970's and are still popular today. Ray Ban is known as one of the top makers of this style of sunglasses.

Ray Ban RB4105 Wayfarer Sunglasses

My favorite wayfarers are the Ray Ban RB4105 Folding Wayfarer Sunglasses. They come in one size fits all yet has five color choices so you can personalize them to your own style. They come with a really cool and handy black, hard shell storage case.

Rayban Wayfarer Sunglasses

RB4105Buy Now

RB2132Buy Now

RB2140Buy Now

RB2140Buy Now

RB4141Buy Now


Ray-Ban RB4021P Polarized Sunglasses

Ray-Ban RB4021P Polarized Sunglasses
Buy Now

Ray Ban also makes sunglasses with polarized lenses. Polarized lenses help protect your eyes from sun glare which makes them perfect if you are into water sports.

Ray-Ban RB4021P Polarized Sunglasses

The Ray Ban Polarized Sunglasses have a unisex style that looks good on men or women. The frame is made from metal while the lenses are made from polycarbonate covered with 100% UV400 protection coating.

Rayban Polarized Sunglasses

RB 3364Buy Now

RB3183Buy Now

ORB3449Buy Now

4068 Oversized WrapBuy Now

RB3465Buy Now


Read More About Sunglasses

Best Tom Ford Sunglasses Reviews
Anyone who knows fashion will know that Tom Ford sunglasses are the signature style of many celebrities and designers. Tom Ford reinvigorated the Gucci brand...

Best Mens Designer Sunglasses
Men's designer sunglasses used to be exclusive to rock stars, actors and sports athletes but now, anybody can wear the same sunglasses as the stars. You may ...

Kaenon Sunglasses Review
Kaenon sunglasses (Kaenon means free and is pronounced Kay-nun) was created in 2001 when two brothers decided to design better sunglasses. They were not happ...

Best Bifocal Sunglasses
Bifocal sunglasses allow you to keep your bifocals while still protecting your eyes. People with vision problems still want to be comfortable in the sun. Sun...

Best Fishing Sunglasses Reviews
Fishing sunglasses are used to provide protection from the sun while you are fishing. It is even more important to wear protective eye gear when out on the w...

Give a thumbs up if you like what you've read. Thanks!

  • 0

This module only appears with actual data when viewed on a live lens. The favorite and lensroll options will appear on a live lens if the viewer is a member of Squidoo and logged in.

Add this to your lens

Still looking for RayBan Sunglasses?

Check these out or browse using the search box!

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    OVARIAN CYST, CAN IT MIMIC PREGNANCY? help me?
    what would be the symptoms of ovarian cyst, if large would it cause pressure on your back? i've been having these weird pains on my left side from my mid to lower abdomen , also a lot of lower back pain that sometimes runs down my leg, when i lay down i feel a heavy pressure on my left side like if it where being pushed down ive been urinating alot and constipated ( when i have a small bowel movement my stool is very very dark), i am so worried, i've only had sex once, we used a condom and it was 2 days before my period ended, im scared to go to the hospital because i;ve been thinking im pregnant since the day after sex, i dont know i think it would be too much coincidence that i start having these symptoms 7 weeks after my first sex encounter, although cyst run in my family most women in my mothers side have gotten them when they were around my age, my mother also had one, but can it be too much coincidence or is it possible?
    have had urine test at the docs(negative), a short and light period, but im still scared

    • ANSWER:
      Well I had two rather large ovarian cyst about 14 months ago..they almost te size of footballs..anyway I never knew they were there for about 10 yrs they hid away on me..the only sign that I had them was that i would have extremely painful periods. Well last year I went to bed christmas night and on christmas morning I woke up in agonizing pain in my lower right back and it was reaching around to my lower right adomen..i went to work thinking ohh this should go away, but it didnt. They ended up calling a family member and rushing me to the er where I spent a better portion of the day. They did blood work and x-rays and nothing showed up in them but when the docter did a Cat Scan and Ultrasound they found the cyst...I would say it is possible or you to have cyst..

      Ovarian cysts are very common. Most are related to ovulation and will disappear spontaneously. Cysts are usually diagnosed by vaginal examination or ultrasound. If the cyst persists it should be removed since it can rupture, undergo torsion or may be malignant. Benign cysts can be managed with the laparoscope, although if the cyst turns out to be a cancer it should be removed via a formal laparotomy. Depending on the situation and the age of the woman, the cyst may be removed on its own or the whole ovary may be removed.

  2. QUESTION:
    help about ovarian cyst problem?
    a few months ago i was having sex and started gettin a pain in my lower abdomen and got chills.. minutes later i felt like i had to puke, starting sweating, and the pain became horrible.. this lasted about 30 mins.. we went to the emergency room and all they said was that it was a urinary track infection.. which i get those often so i knew that wasnt what my pain was from. About 3 months later i get the same pain and same symptoms but its worse and lasted a whole lot longer.. the pain is unbearable and all i can do is just lay there and not move or it will worsen. I go to the doctor and they send me to the ER.. they take x rays and tell me they found a small ovarian cyst in my right ovary.. but all my pain was in the left.. all he did was give me a prescription for pain. does that mean im just gonna have to deal with this pain every time it happens? my grandmother told me she had ovarian cysts which would burst and cause the pain im describing and she said it lasted all through her teenager years till she hit menopause, so is that whats happening to me?

    • ANSWER:
      My wife suffered from Ovarian cysts for years. She was looking for info one day about a year ago and found this website with a natural cure on it. She has been sticking to the plan and has had no more pain since. Check it out.

      http://OvarianCystRemoval.net

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it an ovarian cyst?
    About a month or more ago I started getting sick to my stomach after I would eat. As well as some pain in the stomach and lower abdomen. I went to the doctor, the doctor sent me to the hospital for an x-Ray, and then they called me back to get a CT scan. They told me I had an ovarian cyst and that it would either get smaller and go away, get larger and they would remove it by surgery, or it would rupture. Then after that they never contacted me.
    I went about... 3 weeks later to another doctor, told her what had been the problem, and she said the symptoms I was having didn't exactly sound like an ovarian cyst. She sent me to get an Ultra Sound. When I went they later told me that they hadn't found anything. It was around Halloween and for a while I felt sick and terrible. But some days I wouldn't get sick at all. This past weekend, I'm sad to say, I ate waaay more than I should have. Yet no matter how much I did, I didn't get sick.
    Yesterday I was feeling immense cramps and thought I might start. I did, but it was very light. My periods have always been heavy. I woke up this morning and I feel like I'm already stopping, because I didn't see any blood when I wiped. But I suppose it's too early to tell so I'll be waiting later today to see if it continues on.
    But I don't know...I'm so confused at times. I looked at ovarian cyst symptoms and most of them fit, but then I remember that they didn't find anything when they did the Ultra Sound. So I don't know what I should do. Please help.
    So, lol, just after I posted this question I went and used the restroom (It was #2), and I think I had diarrhea. It was really runny, and then when I wiped the blood was back.
    So yeah.
    I still don't know what's going on.

    • ANSWER:
      Your cyst went away. The end.

  4. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between an ovarian cyst and ovarian cancer?
    My sister has an 'ovarian cyst' 15 cm i n width..... The average cyst rarely exceeds 5 cm...... can a cyst turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cyst is:

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac in the ovary. Many cysts are completely normal. These are called functional cysts. They occur as a result of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary). Functional cysts normally shrink over time, usually in about 1 to 3 months. If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may want to check you again in 1 to 3 months to make sure the cyst has gotten smaller. In certain cases, your doctor may want you to take birth control pills so you won't ovulate. If you don't ovulate, you won't form cysts.

      If you are menopausal and are not having periods, you shouldn't form functional cysts. If you do have a cyst, your doctor will probably want you to have a sonogram so he or she can look at the cyst. What your doctor decides to do after that depends on your age, the way the cyst looks on the sonogram and if you're having symptoms such as pain, bloating, feeling full after eating just a little, and constipation.

      Ovarian Cancer:

      Recognizing ovarian cancer symptoms

      Ovarian cancer often shows no obvious signs or symptoms until late in its development. Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

      General abdominal discomfort and/or pain (gas, indigestion, pressure, swelling, bloating, cramps)

      Nausea, diarrhea, constipation, or frequent urination

      Loss of appetite

      Feeling of fullness even after a light meal

      Weight gain or loss with no known reason

      Abnormal bleeding from the vagina

      These symptoms may be caused by ovarian cancer or by other, less serious conditions. It is important to check with a doctor about any of these symptoms.

      To help find the cause of symptoms, a doctor evaluates a woman's medical history. The doctor also performs a physical exam and orders diagnostic tests. Some exams and tests that may be useful are described below:

      Pelvic exam includes feeling the uterus, vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, and rectum to find any abnormality in their shape or size. (A Pap test, a good test for cancer of the cervix, is often done along with the pelvic exam, but it is not a reliable way to find or diagnose ovarian cancer.)

      Ultrasound refers to the use of high-frequency sound waves. These waves, which cannot be heard by humans, are aimed at the ovaries. The pattern of the echoes they produce creates a picture called a sonogram.

      CA-125 assay is a blood test used to measure the level of CA-125, a tumor marker that is often found in higher-than-normal amounts in the blood of women with ovarian cancer.

      Lower GI series, or barium enema, is a series of x-rays of the colon and rectum. The pictures are taken after the patient is given an enema with a white, chalky solution containing barium. The barium outlines the colon and rectum on the x-ray, making tumors or other abnormal areas easier to see.

      CT (or CAT) scan is a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine.

      Biopsy is the removal of tissue for examination under a microscope. A pathologist studies the tissue to make a diagnosis. To obtain the tissue, the surgeon performs a laparotomy (an operation to open the abdomen). If cancer is suspected, the surgeon performs an oophorectomy (removal of the entire ovary). This is important because, if cancer is present, removing just a sample of tissue by cutting through the outer layer of the ovary could allow cancer cells to escape and cause the disease to spread.

      If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will want to learn the stage (or extent) of disease. Staging is a careful attempt to find out whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to what parts of the body. Staging may involve surgery, x-rays and other imaging procedures, and lab tests. Knowing the stage of the disease helps the doctor plan treatment.

  5. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cancer question?
    Is there anybody out there who has ovarian cancer or knows someone who's had it? I am really worried that I may have it and am waiting for an ultrasound. I've done lots of reading about it, but it's mostly textbook type stuff. I'm not looking for a list of symptoms really, but am wondering if anybody can tell me their own story about how they were diagnosed etc. I have been having a lot of severe pelvic pain along with bleeding and I know that I have what might be cysts in my ovaries, but I'm scared that they might be cancerous. Please somebody, if you can share with me I would be most grateful, thank you!!

    • ANSWER:
      I am a male but I have seen few cases of Ovarian cancers. I have also seen few patient surviving if treated in the early stages and by removal of the reproductive system completely. Mere Ultrasound test is not enough to find various factors of the disease you may have. Please consult your Oncologist and he will have to do some other tests and biopsy explained below to evaluate the position and give proper treatment.

      Ovarian cancer is cancer of the ovaries, the egg releasing and hormone-producing organs of the female reproductive tract. Cancerous, or malignant, cells divide and multiply in an abnormal fashion.

      If ovarian cancer is suspected, several of the following tests and examinations will be necessary to make a diagnosis.

      * a complete medical history to assess all the risk factors
      * a thorough bi-manual pelvic examination
      * CA-125 assay
      * one or more various imaging procedures
      * a lower GI series, or barium enema
      * diagnostic laparoscopy

      Bi-Manual Pelvic Examination

      The exam should include feeling the following organs for any abnormalities in shape or size: the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina, bladder, and rectum. Because the ovaries are located deep within the pelvic area, it is unlikely that a manual exam will pick up an abnormality while the cancer is still localized. However, a full examination provides the practitioner with a more complete picture. An enlarged ovary does not confirm cancer, as the ovary may be large because of a cyst or endometriosis. While women should have an annual Pap test, this test screens for cervical cancer. Cancerous ovarian cells, however, might be detected on the slide. Effectiveness of using Pap smears for ovarian cancer detection is about 10-30%.

      Ca-125 Assay

      This is a blood test to determine the level of CA-125, a biomarker or tumor marker. A tumor marker is a measurable protein-based substance given off by the tumor. A series of CA-125 tests may be done to see if the amount of the marker in the blood is staying stable, increasing or decreasing. A rising CA-125 level usually indicates cancer, while a stable or declining value is more characteristic of a cyst. The CA-125 level should never be used alone to diagnose ovarian cancer. It is elevated in about 80% of women with ovarian cancer, but in 20% of cases is not. In addition, it could be elevated because of a non-ovarian cancer, or it can be elevated with non-malignant gynecologic conditions, such as endometriosis or ectopic pregnancy. During menstruation the CA-125 level may be elevated, so the test is best done when the woman is not having her menstrual period.

      Imaging

      There are several different imaging techniques used in ovarian cancer evaluation. A fluid-filled structure such as a cyst creates a different image than does a solid structure, such as a tumor. An ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves that create a visual pattern of echoes of the structures at which they are aimed. It is painless, and is the same technique used to check the developing fetus in the womb. Ultrasound may be done externally through the abdomen and lower pelvic area, or with a transvaginal probe.

      Other painless imaging techniques are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Color Doppler analysis provides additional contrast and accuracy in distinguishing masses. It remains unclear whether Doppler is effective in reducing the high number of false-positives with transvaginal ultrasonography. These imaging techniques allow better visualization of the internal organs and can detect abnormalities without having to perform surgery.

      Lower Gi Series

      A lower GI series, or barium enema, uses a series of x rays to highlight the colon and rectum. To provide contrast, the patient drinks a chalky liquid containing barium. This test might be done to see if the cancer had spread to these areas.

      Diagnostic Laparoscopy

      This technique uses a thin hollow lighted instrument inserted through a small incision in the skin near the belly button to visualize the organs inside of the abdominal cavity. If the ovary is believed to be malignant, the entire ovary is removed (oophorectomy) and its tissue sent for evaluation to the pathologist, even though only a small piece of the tissue is needed for evaluation. If cancer is present, great care must be taken not to cause the rupture of the malignant tumor, as this would cause spreading of the cancer to adjacent organs. If the cancer is completely contained in the ovary, its removal functions also as the treatment. If the cancer has spread or is suspected to have spread, then a saline solution may be instilled into the cavity and then drawn out again. This technique is called peritoneal lavage. The aspirated fluid will be evaluated for the presence of cancer cells. If peritoneal fluid is present, called ascites, a sample of this will also be drawn and examined for malignant cells. If cancer cells are present in the peritoneum, then treatment will be directed at the abdominal cavity as well.-

  6. QUESTION:
    What can an x-ray of the stomach / abdomen show?
    ive been having severe gastro symptoms. ive had a cat scan that just showed ovarian cysts. blood work showed nothing so far. my new doc ordered my extensive blood work, urine samples, and an xray. what would an xray of my abdomen / stomach show? i may need an endoscopy. would that be better in ur opinion?

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure why he would order an x-ray when a CT is basically an x-ray just more advanced. Prepare yourself for a long list of test. Gastro issues seem to puzzle docs or they do in my case leaving me with searching the internet which is leading to self diagnoses and fear of the worst! I am set for an upper and lower endoscopy in NOV. I swear I am cutting my self open to see whats in there after these test. LOL JK!

  7. QUESTION:
    Do I have ovarian cysts?
    On Aug 11, my mom took me to the doctor because I had some pain in my lower stomach area. My mom thought I had ovarian cysts because she has it and so do a lot of females in my family. The doctor said it was probably my kidneys, and she wanted me to get blood work, a urine test and a x-ray. The pain went away, and I thought it was just a stomach ache. Last night I was watching a movie and I started to get a horrible pain in the same place as before, and it progressed to my whole right side in a matter of minutes. It was so bad I couldn't even move. They took me to the hospital and they took the same tests as before. They let me go and they told me to come back for a ultra sound in the morning. During the ultra sound, they just checked both my sides and my bladder and they said "Nothing showed up on the tests. Go home." I went to my doctor again and she said I had a kidney infection and to take this medicine for 10 days then come back for more tests. One of my mom's friend had the same thing happen to her, and it was ovarian cysts and the doctors assistant said it probably was something like that as well, because each time I had the pain, it was about 2 weeks after my period. I checked the symptoms of both, and I had more symptoms of the ovarian cysts than the kidney infection. After the testing after 10 days, my mom will try to get my doctor to refer me to a gynecological. Do you think I have ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      It's possible you have cysts. I had a similar experience to yours and they sent me home just as they sent you home. But it was a misdiagnosis and I did have a cyst. Of course, there are also many girls who have the same experience and are sent home and told they don't have cysts... and it's true, they don't have cysts. So I'm not saying your diagnosis is wrong. You should definitely be referred to a gynecologist, and your mother should be aggressive about getting the referral quickly.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can ovarian cyst cause this much pain?
    It all started about 3 months ago, my left side really really hurt. If felt as if something was pulling at my side, I charlked it up to my IBS and moved on. I started noticing that every month since then, about a week before my peiod that my left side would hurt. I finally went to my Gyno and was told that I had a small cyst. I am curious if that is what could have been causing my side pain, it is also in the bend of my back as well. I went to a doctor this week and they said they thought I had pulled something, but they can't find what. This is after x-rays and blood tests. Has anyone had these symptoms with an ovarian cyst or should I insist on more tests. I don't know what to do, can someone please help!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Deffinately. I get cysts on my left ovary and they can be extremely painful, to the point of being in pain when i would walk. My doctor said that usually they are harmless and will go away on their own ( one of mine took 3 or 4 months to go down) and the reason for the pain the week before my period was because of ovulation.If the doctor says that the tests are necessary then I guess you should do them just to make sure something isn't wrong, but in all honesty it may not be needed. If you're in extreme pain i would say go to the emergency room just incase.

  9. QUESTION:
    questions about dvt and ovarian cysts?
    Any help is appreciated!

    Below is a copy of the document my mother sent to her Doctor. She is 80 years old and was making a plea for help to her provider of 20 plus years. She has lived with rheumatoid and osteoporosis for many years and tolerates pain well. Since mid November, the situation has added many other things. We cannot get questions answered out of any of the doctors involved and her life is not good. Any suggestions on what we should do? We are at a dead end and she cannot continue like this.

    I would like to discuss some of my questions. I am not sure if an appointment is necessary or the questions could be answered on the phone. I have compiled a list of the recent events. Due to all the changing symptoms and different tests, I get nervous. I cannot immediately think of my questions, or details that might help the doctor, so they are listed at the end.

    SYMPTOMS SINCE NOVEMBER 15, 2010
    PAST

    Pain lower back and running up from right knee up to the groin.

    For several days, I experienced unusual bowel movements, sometimes explosive then constipation. I thought this might be stopping the morphine pills, but I do not actually know this for a fact.

    When the leg pain stopped (not the lower back) extreme pain arrived horizontally across entire lower abdomen for the week.
    After the vetebroplasty, I had relief of back pain, except left side.

    CURRENT AND CONTINUAL

    I am EXTREMELY weak and tired. During the past 8 weeks, I rarely leave my house. December 7th, I had stomach cramping and terrible heart burn.

    I am not normal or functioning in any kind of usual way. I do not eat, and I feel nauseated constantly. Food has a nasty taste. In the above period of time, I have lost approximately 18 pounds. A few times, I have had an hour or two where I feel slightly better, but 98% of the time I just feel awful. Everything I do wears me out and I am short of breath.

    I still have left side pain above the hip joint. This is reoccurring and can be intense. We discussed that we should worry about this later.

    TESTS
    11/14/2011
    I had a routine appointment with Dr. Miniter. He did x-rays of the hip and knee right side.
    11/19/2011
    X-ray at 7th Street campus for extreme lower back and leg pain. I was told I had no broken bones or anything out of place and this was arthritis. I was given 2 morphine pain shots with no results.
    11/21/2011
    I received the MRI ordered by Dr. Miniter.

    11/18/2011
    I went to the ER west campus. A CAT scan revealed a cyst in right ovary, and hernia. The blood work did not indicate infection according to Dr Sowyers, ER physician.
    12/5/2011
    Appointment at the Pain Center in Moline. Dr. Wagle gave an injection in the back. No results.
    Next, you found L1 compression fracture.
    12/23/2011
    Vetebroplasty at Trinity west. After the procedure another CAT scan.
    12/28/2011
    A visit to check eye pressure with Dr. Wayne. Due to problems with second eye, I have an appointment in IA City in February. Dr. Wayne has never experienced this sort of problem after 5 laser treatments in her office.
    1/4/2012
    Ultrasounds various views at Trinity east campus. I will schedule another ultrasound to check cyst in 6 weeks.
    1/8/2012
    Mailed this document to the Doctor.
    1/12/2012
    Doctor called back. I went next door and missed call. He left message stating he would call back.

    1/18/2012
    Still no call back. In the morning called office to remind him. That afternoon nurse called back and said he did not have any further need to talk to me. I asked her a about the cyst. She said we would see at the next 6 week ultrasound. End of conversation.

    QUESTIONS
    ABOUT THE CYST
    Is this liquid or solid?

    Do you have any indication this is cancer?

    Do you feel any treatment will be required in the future?

    ABOUT THE BLOOD CLOT
    What indicated a possible blood clot?

    Any symptoms I should watch for in the future?

    Has this resolved itself or do we need to treat this?

    GENERAL
    Are any of my past or present symptoms related/typical of a blood clot, the ovarian cyst, or the hernia?

    Are any of my current problems due to taking Fosimax for eight years?

    Any other ideas on why all these symptoms are happening in this short period of time?

    Will a pain patch, such as xylocaine (not sure of the spelling), help the reoccurring left side pain?

    I need help to feel better. This is not easy and has lasted greater than 8 weeks. I feel something is very wrong.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, much of what she wrote is of little use to me. There's much that's missing. An MRI was performed but no body part was mentioned and no report included. Dr. Wagle gave her an "injection in back". Was this an epidural? Why is morphine sulfate the drug of choice? Yes, I know it's the gold standard but what other analgesics were used first? So far as the oral form of morphine is concerned, was she taking MS Contin or Oromorph SR? What was the dosage and how long had she taken them? Why did she discontinue? How long has she had pain? What other conditions has she been diagnosed with that haven't been mentioned here? (I already see one -- osteoporosis as manifested by the L1 compression fracture. Picked up on that when she mentioned Fosamax but suspected it with the type of fracture). The vertebroplasty will have corrected the lumbar vertebra's (L1) position and repaired the fractured vertebral body (still talking about L1). Is she still experiencing pain in her lower back? About the ocular issues, these are vaguely described but may be about glaucoma in one eye (which one?). The laser procedure that helps reduce fluid and therefore intraocular pressure sometimes has to be done more than once and it doesn't work for all kinds of glaucoma but it should be used in conjunction with other methods. I expect that Dr, Wayne (who "has never experienced this sort of problem before") got some continuing education. Happens to us all. But this account doesn't tell me what sort of problems the ophthalmologist encountered. I have no information about the hernia, it's size or it's location.

      "QUESTIONS ABOUT THE CYST: Is this liquid or solid? Do you have any indication this is cancer? Do you feel any treatment will be required in the future?" -- Cysts are liquid-filled or semi-solid. If ultrasound has shown this to be cyst, then in all likelihood that's exactly what it is. Ovarian cysts are fairly common and usually don't require any special treatment and can go away on their own. Cysts form when there's inflammation. Does it matter if it's liquid-filled or semi-solid??? Cysts aren't cancerous (malignant). They're cysts, not tumors.

      "ABOUT THE BLOOD CLOT: What indicated a possible blood clot? Any symptoms I should watch for in the future? Has this resolved itself or do we need to treat this?" -- Where in this post was a blood clot mentioned? They tend to form in large veins, which are deeper and can be in either the upper extremities (arms, neck) or lower extremities (legs, pelvis). Was she told she's at risk for one? What are her risk factors? Symptoms of a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are pain, swelling, redness and warmth.

      "GENERAL: (1) Are any of my past or present symptoms related/typical of a blood clot, the ovarian cyst, or the hernia? (2) Are any of my current problems due to taking Fosimax for eight years? (3) Any other ideas on why all these symptoms are happening in this short period of time? (4) Will a pain patch, such as xylocaine (not sure of the spelling), help the reoccurring left side pain?" -- (1) No to the first, possibly to the second and third. Insufficient info. (2) No. (3) Your advanced age is a big factor. Your concurrent conditions. I don't know all your diagnoses but I suspect it's more than I'm seeing here. You may have inadvertently contributed to all this over the the years. (4) The primary use of a lidocaine 5% TD patch is to treat neuralgia (nerve pain) but it's also used to treat other chronic local pain. (You spelled xylocaine correctly but to my knowledge there's no patch) Ask about this. Will it help? Can't know until it's been tried. But better to find out WHY you have the pain to begin with.

      "I need help to feel better. This is not easy and has lasted greater than 8 weeks. I feel something is very wrong." -- Conditions left unaddressed or untreated can last longer than 8 weeks. They can last a lifetime.

  10. QUESTION:
    worried ovary cyst?
    so i went to da E.R ... because i had pain in my right side on da lower part of my stomache and they tought it was the appendix. so they did X-ray and found out dat i have a cyst on my right ovary the doctor said it was very small and that very common in women. He said to go to my gyno and see what they say. . . But im kinda scared b-cuz i've heard a lot of people who have cyst can't have kids. does anyone know what is the cause of da cyst on da ovaries. i know it's fluid but its there any other causes for it.

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have. I don't think that you have to worry if your cyst is small. It is really very common and I'm sure that it won't leave you infertile.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious) and I'm not having any fertility problems.

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  11. QUESTION:
    ovarian cancer symptoms please help?
    in oct of 06 i had emergency surgery on a cyst that burst.It was so bad that i had blood all inside me. im only 22 years of age. i know that they ran some tests and they said that i didnt have cancer. However,i dont have med insurance and im not working(at home taking care of my mom n bro)For the 1st few months afterwords i was ok.But recently i have been having alot more pains.Worst then b4.The same symptoms that i had b4 i have now but more frquent n more sever then b4.I have hormonal periods,abdomen pain,esp during period.some missed periods,But when i do get them its sever pain.wieght loss, loss of eating,nausea,back pain,constipation,diarrehea. I feel shortness of breath/tight chest feelings @ times shooting pain in arms or leg. My adomen pain feels like cramps,but they r 24/7. hurts to stretch,cough,sneeze, talk or walk. Im not sure if whats going on. can any1 give me advice or thoughts on what it can be or what to do. Thanks... laurissa_lala@yahoo.com

    • ANSWER:
      The following was sent to me by e-mail.
      I thought it was very informative and useful.

      (Sorry, This is the way it looked after I copied and pasted from the original e-mail .)

      SIGNS OF OVARIAN CANCER (even in the absence of Ovaries)

      THIS IS A MUST TO READ TO THE END

      An Eye Opener on Ovarian Cancer
      I hope you all take the time to read
      this and pass it on to all you can. Send this to the women in
      your life that you care about.
      Years ago, Gilda Radner died of ovarian
      cancer. Her symptoms were inconclusive, and she was treated for
      everything under the sun until it was too late. This blood test
      finally
      identified her illness but alas, too late. She wrote a book to
      heighten
      awareness. Gene Wilder is her widower.

      KATHY'S STORY: this is the story of
      Kathy West
      As all of you know, I have Primary
      Peritoneal Cancer. This cancer has only recently been identified
      as its OWN type of cancer, but it is essentially Ovarian Cancer.
      Both types of cancer are diagnosed in
      the same way, with the "tumor marker" CA-125 BLOOD TEST, and
      they are
      treated in the same way - surgery to remove the primary tumor
      and then chemotherapy with Taxol and Carboplatin.

      Having gone through this ordeal, I want
      to save others from the same fate . That is why I am sending
      this message to you and hope you will print it and give it or
      send it via E-mail to everybody you know.
      One thing I have learned is that each of
      us must take TOTAL responsibility for our own health care. I
      thought I had done that because I always had an annual physical and PAP
      smear, did >>> a monthly Self-Breast Exam, went to the dentist at
      >> least twice a year,
      etc. I even insisted on a sigmoidoscopy and a bone density test
      >> last >>> year. When I had a total hysterectomy in 1993, I thought
      >> that I did not have to worry about getting any of the female
      reproductive organ cancers.
      LITTLE DID I KNOW. I don't have ovaries
      (and they were HEALTHY when they were removed), but I have what
      is essentially ovarian cancer. Strange, isn't it?

      These are just SOME of the things our
      Doctors never tell us: ONE out of every 55 women will get
      OVARIAN or PRIMARY PERITONEAL CANCER.
      The "CLASSIC" symptoms are an ABDOMEN
      that rather SUDDENLY ENLARGES and CONSTIPATION and/or DIARRHEA.
      I had these classic symptoms and went to
      the doctor. Because these symptoms seemed to be "abdominal", I
      went to a gastroenterologist. He ran tests that were designed to determine

      whether >>> there was a bacteria infection; these tests were
      >> negative, and I was >>> diagnosed with "Irritable Bowel Syndrome". I

      >> guess I would have accepted
      >> >>> this diagnosis had it not been for my enlarged abdomen. I swear
      to
      >> you,
      >> >>> it looked like I was 4-5 months pregnant! I therefore insisted
      on
      > more
      >> >>> tests
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> They took an X-ray of my abdomen; it was
      >> >>> negative. I was again assured that I had Irritable Bowel
      >> Syndrome
      >> and
      >> >>> was encouraged to go on my scheduled month-long trip to Europe.
      I
      >> >>> couldn't wear any of my slacks or shorts because I couldn't get
      them
      >> >>> buttoned, and I KNEW something was radically wrong. I INSISTED
      on
      > more
      >> >>> tests, and they reluctantly) scheduled me for a CT-Scan (just to
      >> shut
      >> me
      >> >>> up, I think). This is what I mean by "taking charge of our own
      >> health
      >> >>> care."
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> The CT-Scan showed a lot of fluid in my
      >> >>> abdomen (NOT normal). Needless to say, I had to cancel my trip
      and
      >> have
      >> >>> FIVE POUNDS of fluid drawn off at the hospital (not a pleasant
      >> >>> experience I assure you), but NOTHING compared to what was ahead
      of
      >> me.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Tests revealed cancer cells in the
      >> >>> fluid. Finally, finally, finally, the doctor ran a CA-125 blood
      >> test,
      >> >>> and I was properly diagnosed.
      >> >>>
      >> >>> I HAD THE CLASSIC SYMPTOMS FOR OVARIAN
      >> >>> CANCER, AND YET THIS SIMPLE CA-125 BLOOD TEST HAD NEVER BEEN RUN
      ON
      >> ME,
      >> >>> not as part of my annual physical exam and not when I was
      > symptomatic.
      >> >>> This is an inexpensive and simple blood test!
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> PLEASE, PLEASE TELL ALL YOUR FEMALE
      >> >>> FRIENDS AND RELATIVES TO INSIST ON A CA-125 BLOOD TEST EVERY
      >> YEAR AS >>> PART OF THEIR ANNUAL PHYSICAL EXAMS. >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Be fore warned that their doctors might
      >> >>> try to talk them out of it, saying, "IT ISN'T NECESSARY."
      Believe
      >> me,
      >>
      >> >>> had I known then what I know now, we would have caught my cancer
      >> much
      >> >>> earlier (before it was a stage 3 cancer). Insist on the CA-125
      BLOOD
      >> >>> TEST; DO NOT take "NO" for an answer!
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> The normal range for a CA-125 BLOOD TEST
      >> >>> is between zero and 35. MINE WAS 754. (That's right, 754!). If
      the
      >> >>> number is slightly above 35, you can have another done in three
      or
      > six
      >> >>> months and keep a close eye on it, just as women do when they
      >> have >>> fibroid tumors or when men have a slightly elevated PSA
      >> test (Prostatic >>> Specific Antigens) that helps diagnose prostate

      >> cancer. >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Having the CA-125 test done annually can
      >> >>> alert you early, and that's the goal in diagnosing any type of
      >> cancer
      >> -
      >> >>> catching it early.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Do you know 55 women? If so, at least
      >> >>> one of them will have this VERY AGGRESSIVE cancer. Please, go to

      >> your
      >> >>> doctor and insist on a CA-125 test and have one EVERY YEAR for
      the
      >> rest
      >> >>> of your life.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> And forward this message to every woman
      >> >>> you know, and tell all of your female family members and
      friends.
      >> Though
      >> >>> the median age for this cancer is 56, (and, guess what, I'm
      exactly
      >> 56),
      >> >>> women as young as 22 have it. Age is no factor.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> A NOTE FROM THE RN:
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Well , after reading this, I made some
      >> >>> calls. I found that the CA-125 test is an ovarian screening test
      >> >>> equivalent to a man's PSA test prostate screen (which my
      husband's
      >> >>> doctor automatically gives him in his physical each year and
      > insurance
      >> >>> pays for it). I called the general practitioner's office about
      >> having
      >> >>> the test done. The nurse had never heard of it. She told me that
      she
      >> >>> doubted that insurance would pay for it. So I called Prudential
      >> >>> Insurance Co, and got the same response. Never heard of it - it
      >> won't
      >> be
      >> >>> covered.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> I explained that it was the same as the
      >> >>> PSA test they had paid for my husband for years. After
      conferring
      > with
      >> >>> whomever they confer with, she told me that the CA-125 would be

      >> covered. >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> It is in a GP's office and 5 at
      >> >>> the GYN's. This is a screening test that should be required just

      >> like
      >> a
      >> >>> PAP smear (a PAP smear cannot detect problems with your
      ovaries).
      >> And
      >> >>> you must insist that your insurance company pay for it.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Gene Wilder and Pierce Brosnan (his wife
      >> >>> had it, too) are lobbying for women's health issues, saying that

      >> this
      >> >>> test should be required in our physicals, just like the PAP and
      the
      >> >>> mammogram. PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO SEND THIS OUT TO ALL THOSE
      YOU
      > CAN.
      >> >>> BE IT MALE OR FEMALE, IT SHOULD NOT MATTER, AS THEY CAN FORWARD
      >> IT ALSO >>> TO THOSE LOVED ONES THEY KNOW.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> IF YOU HAVE! E A PROBLEM WITH FORWARDING
      >> >>> SOMETHING AS IMPORTANT AS THIS, HERE'S A LITTLE HINT THAT MAY
      ASSIST
      >> YOU
      >> >>> WITH YOUR DECISION ~ JUST PRETEND THAT THIS IS A JOKE, WHICH IT
      >> >>> CERTAINLY IS NOT, AND SEND IT OUT TO ALL THE FOLKS YOU WOULD IF
      IT
      >> WAS.
      >> >>> THANKS
      >> >>>

  12. QUESTION:
    I have Colitis and an Ovarian Cyst..?
    I was in the ER and they told me I have these.. A couple months ago I had Fatty Liver and it was enlarged. This is the 3rd day on Cipro and Metronidazole and I still have diarrhea (no blood, but did have some when I went into the hospital). I am also now very dizzy and feel a little sore in my abdomen. I have been dealing with this diarrhea for about 8 months now. I dont have insurance to see a dr, so when I feel bad I go to the ER. I was wondering if it's normal to continue to have diarrhea when on these meds and if the dizziness is normal? What could this be coming from? My white cells are low and I have a bacterial infection.. When should I go back to the ER? I did have mucus and blood before going into the ER and STRONG abdominal cramping..

    • ANSWER:
      The ovaries are part of what is called the "pituitary axis" that includes 4 glands, the thyroid gland, adrenal glands, ovaries, and pituitary gland. Anytime you have a problem with any one of these glands, it affects them all in a negative way. Dizziness is generally due to the lowering of your blood pressure and the adrenal glands can have a profound effect on you getting dizzy. A simple test for this is to sit in a chair for a few minutes until you are in a rest state then stand up quickly. If you get dizzy, it is a strong indication that our adrenal glands are weak and most likely exhausted.

      Fatty liver is another way of telling you that you have intrahepatic gallstones in your liver that do not show up in x-rays or scans because these stones have few minerals, just thickened and hardened bile in the liver that just looks like bile on these diagnostic tests. Your liver can function even when you have lost about 60% of its capability. A healthy person will produce about 1.5 quarts of bile per day and one of the jobs of bile is to sanitize the colon. When you get this liver clogging called fatty liver, you have greatly reduced your body's ability to do it's normal functions. Taking drugs should only be done in a life threatening situation because drugs damage the liver and exacerbate this problem. Further complicating this is taking antibiotics. Antibiotics work by turning the "B" cells of the humoral immunity on and this turns OFF the "T" cells because they are reciprocal. The "T" cells protect the body from cancer cells and infections.

      Colitis is generally a result of dysbiosis of the intestines creating a feeding ground for bacteria, viruses, and PARASITES. Most colitis is from parasites. Typical medical diagnosis used to find parasites is not good and in many cases do not find the bad guys.

      Organs develop cysts typically as a way to compensate for nutritional deficiencies and in many cases as a result of interference fields from scars or traumas.

      The medical solution to all this will be drugs. That is "MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH" and not a long term health solution because your body is in trouble nutritionally and loaded with toxins. Drugs will not address those issues, just simply treat the symptoms while you deteriorate as a result of the toxins and deficiencies. In fact, the antibiotics have destroyed 3/4 of your immune system by killing the intestinal flora in your intestines.

      From all indications of these problems, you have been following some very bad nutritional advice or just eating typical American toxins some call food. Eating bad fats and low fat diets set you up for a fatty liver situation and if you drink or take drugs, you cannot escape the liver clogging problem.

      The problem is that you need to detox your liver & gallbladder, but if you do that before getting better, you will overload your body with toxins and it will make you sicker. The first step should be getting your digestion working correctly, then up regulate your cellular energy. You can get rid of the parasites causing the colitis, but then you need to clean up that colon so you can get rid of that colitis issue. If you do have ovarian cysts, there is a protocol using glandulars that will help with that by supporting the health of the ovaries. You will also have to re-establish the intestinal flora, but that will take some time by changing your diet, etc. A healthy person will have about 3 pounds of intestinal flora. That takes time to establish.

      The liver & gallbladder cleansing takes some time and education on what to do. Along with taking some good herbs that support the liver, it works very well and will leave you with a good working liver and contribute to putting you on the road to real health.

      A Certified Nutritional Therapist can help you with all this.

      good luck to you

  13. QUESTION:
    Would this be symptoms of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction?
    Lower right back pain in the general area of the kidney brought on by a simple, every day action like bending or turning.
    Front thigh pain just above the knee occurring at the same time. Pain lasts for weeks at a time.

    My doctor has referred me to get an MRI done because she suspects a problem with a compressed disk. From what I've been reading, I'm leaning more towards Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction but I'm no doctor. Plus, I don't know if the front thigh pain would be a symptom. Anyone know?
    Thanks
    I can find plenty of information on back thigh pain due to sciatica but my pain in in the front thigh.

    • ANSWER:
      I had acute onset lower right abdominal pain, like appendix pain, only it took my breath away and my legs away. I ended up in ER and then we started the system, ended up in gynecology. All the tests, x-ray, ultrasound were normal so we can rule out appendix, kidney stones, gall stones, bladder stones, infection, ovarian cancer, cysts, STDs all the associated tubes and still NO answer. I then read up on referred pain, where you have a pain in your big toe but are having a heart attack. I have Arthritis in my spine, went to my GP said 'Could this be referred pain?' I was sent for a MRI, low and behold Disc Bulge? I was happy, had the reason. pain was acute lower right abdominal and kinda knee, thigh area? However the Disc shown on the MRI was the Disc for Sciatica which I did not have. In fact it seems this pain was coming from Disc higher up T12. Anyway St Patrick's Day stood up and BANG, this time lower right, lower left acute onset pain and sciatica! I have now lost the feeling to my right foot, waiting on the results of the EMG test as the area would be S1 and not L3/4 Bulge let alone T12, abdominal pain. Yes much depends on WHICH Disc! Could be more than one, could be nerve root involvement, could be nerve entrapment at the hip, the list is endless.

  14. QUESTION:
    So many symptoms, no answers?
    My partner started having severe low back/pelvic pain.She,s 40yr, non smoker, very active, goes to the gym eats right. It started 4 months ago when she realized she had pain when she sat for more than 2 hours,so at work she stood during her 10 hr shift.Then the pain came when she sat for more than 5 minutes,now she cant sit down at all.When she sleeps at night she wakes up screaming in pain when she goes to move or shift her position.She says it feels as if her pelvis is frozen,and has to "chip away at the ice" to move, which causes her pain that goes to 10 instantly.She's been to OB/GYN,Spine specialist,primary care MD,and GI,she,s had x-ray,cat scan, MRI,blood tests,and bone scan,other than an extremly slow colin they find nothing. She had endometriosis, frequent fibriods and ovarian cysts.She has not had endo pain in years and her pain does not come with her period.Yesterday a new symptom, pain and numbness down her left arm.She,s at the end of her road. please help
    She takes 15-20grams of fiber a day, vitamins, probiotics, anything and everything she has tried to solve this problem. She,s been a nurse for 20 years and knows the tricks of the trade so to speak. She,s been extremly proactive about solving this, no one seems to have an answer.
    As i sit here filling in her history her back/pelvic pain is combining with the sharp numbness in her arm, she now has the sharp shooting down her leg, the only thing that ties them is that their both on the left side. I,ve made moist heating pads by wetting towels , putting them in plastic bags and putting them in the microwave. aaahhh so frustrating

    • ANSWER:
      I hunted through all the things I could think of on this. The closest match for the pain symptoms is some kind of nerve trapping...but a slipped or collapsed disc would have been found by now.
      However there is one kind of nerve trapping where the foramen is narrowed by (usually bony) growths. These are the holes in the pelvic bone that nerves go through from the spine to the legs. I'm thinking, with all the endo fibroid cyst problems she's had, this could be blocked by lesions or scar tissue from the endo....not being womb lining these would not hurt at period time, it would just be scar tissue pinching the nerves. The suddenly worse when trying to move (especially lying on her back) is very much a pinched nerve symptom.
      There could also be scar tissue adhereing to the colon, NOT nice when that has to keep moving for digestion.
      If I were her, I'd get a little laparoscopic look-see for this type of thing, which being soft tissue would not show on xrays. Actually an ultrasound might show more.

      >>>>
      On the diet side of things...that looks like overkill to me! The role of fibre in diet is to provide bulk, to move other matter through the system. It should not be "taken" a supplements, but eaten together with that other food. Wholegrain everything, root vegetables. Then the probiotics are meant to improve digestion, again they need something to work on. Otherwise they will multiply like crazy in the gut, and a slow colon would contain enough partly digested food to keep the yeasts going for weeks. Add fibre for bulk, you get a long slow colon doubled in size with small bubbles of air. I'd be inclined to go on a two-week diet of very very bland foods, vegetables only steamed, fish or chicken, salads (oil dressing ok though) fruit (not citrus), rice or pasta (wholemeal) but no supplements, no sugar, no artificial sweeteners colours or preservatives, no milk products. This might take longer to go through the colon but it will not be bulky and blown up with trapped gas from lactobaccilus. So any external lesions on the colon would hurt less.
      No gym for those 2 weeks either.
      IDK - these are just my observations based on me and a large family with all kinds of problems over many years. Just hope some of it helps a little bit.

  15. QUESTION:
    Whats a cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      You can't get a cyst from sex, however if you were to have an ovarian cyst, it could cause pain during and after sexual intercourse.

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  16. QUESTION:
    Does a cyst go away on it's own or does it rupture?
    I was wondering. I had a 2 and a half inch cyst 2 years ago. Said it was gone but I'm having pain in the same ovary. Maybe endometriosis or another cyst? I don't know, I don't want to go to the doctors right now, they say the same stuff. How can I get this tenderness and pain to go away. It all started when I was pregnant in 03 thats when I felt the pain, it seemed like it was bowel dysfunctions though but i know now that it's not. Also, I had my tubes cut and burned 2 years ago.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of ovarian cysts since I was 17 and I'm 26 now. Usually ovarian cysts go away on their own after a few cycles, however sometimes they can continue to grow which can cause pain and tenderness.

      I had a 4.6cm ovarian cyst on my left ovary in April this year that caused me the worst pain I ever experienced and my gyno put me on bedrest for a week, the cyst ruptured in June but after it ruptured I continued to have the same pain and tender feeling like the cyst was still there.

      I had millions (not really millions although it felt like it) of tests which included urine samples, blood tests, ultrasounds, CT-scans, x-rays etc done but everything looked and came back normal. After months of suffering with pain and struggling to get a diagnosis, I saw a gyneacologist that was finally willing to listen to me and recommended doing a laparoscopy to look for endometriosis because based on my symptoms (which also included pain with intercourse, pain with bowel movements, intense period pain and cramping throughout my entire cycle and fatigue).

      Well 2 and 1/2 weeks ago I had my laparoscopy and was diagnosed with endometriosis. Finally a diagnosis.

      I would recommend you see your gyno and if you have and they say it's nothing, I would recommend you get a second opinion from another gyno to see what they say could be causing this.

      Good luck, I hope you find a cause to your pain.

  17. QUESTION:
    what should i expect for a first consultation about ovarian cysts?
    i thnk my mum said im going in january and that im going to have two at the same time( if tht makes sense)
    bcuz its like the first time
    anyway i went to the doctes and hes like yea u got ovarian cysts
    and blah blah

    i basically wanna know what stuff will the specialist will do to me
    like blood tests or sumthing
    and im 16 if it makes any difference

    i really dnt wanna blood test when the docter did it i had massive bruises
    lol
    (sorry for the spelling mistakes)

    • ANSWER:
      After the specialist (a gynecologist most likely for the second visit) takes your history-meaning asking about symptoms like pain if any he may do some other tests like an ultrasound.

      They may order other kinds of x-rays such as a special kind of X-ray called a CT Scan.

      If you would like to talk some more about this as far as more specifics about what might go on please feel free to e-mail me off site any time if your mom says it's ok but first let her know that you would like to talk to her some more about what's going to happen at the visit with the specialist because you have some questions.

      In the mean time here's the link to a site that might also be of some help: http://forums.obgyn.net/young-women

  18. QUESTION:
    what is a cyst?
    What causes it? How can one be removed? Does it go away by itself?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to, there are many different types of cysts.

      A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs. A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      I would recommend that if you have a cyst or think you have a cyst that you consult with your doctor for further evaluation and discuss any concerns with them.

      Good luck :)

  19. QUESTION:
    WHAT is a Cyst?
    I heard you can get it from sex.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are refering to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      You can't get a cyst from sex, however if you were to have an ovarian cyst, it could cause pain during and after sexual intercourse.

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  20. QUESTION:
    What is are cysts?????
    i have one in my left boob near my nipple and i am scared and im 13 HELP me plz!
    Plz answer

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      If you have a cyst in your breast, I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation to see what he/she says or recommends. Remember that cysts in young women are rarely a sign of something serious such as cancer and that breast cysts can also come and go just like ovarian cysts.

      Good luck :)

  21. QUESTION:
    what cause a cyst?????????????

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in people of any age. Sometimes they may be felt as an abnormal or new lump or bump anywhere in the body. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Since cysts vary in size, they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.

      Cysts can arise through a variety of processes in the body, including

      * "wear and tear" or simple obstructions to the flow of fluid,

      * infections,

      * tumors,

      * chronic inflammatory conditions,

      * genetic (inherited) conditions, and

      * defects in developing organs in the embryo.

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump." For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (X-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CT scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).

      There are hundreds of types of cysts that can arise in the body. Some of the more well-known types of cysts are

      * cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease),

      * ovarian cysts,

      * cysts within the thyroid gland,

      * Baker cyst (popliteal cyst) behind the knee,

      * ganglion cysts of the joints and tendons,

      * cysts of the glands within the eyelid, termed chalazions, and

      * sebaceous cysts of the small glands in the skin.

      The majority of cysts are benign, but some may produce symptoms due to their size and/or location. Rarely, cysts can be associated with malignant tumors (cancers) or serious infections. If you're concerned about any abnormal swelling or "lump," talk to your doctor. He or she can recommend appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the cyst.

  22. QUESTION:
    What is a cyst and where can you get them?
    I have heard this word 'cyst' thrown about, but do not understand what it exactly means.

    Are they bad, why do you some women get them, where can you get them, what are they exactly?!

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      You can't get a cyst from sex, however if you were to have an ovarian cyst, it could cause pain during and after sexual intercourse.

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  23. QUESTION:
    what is a cyst i really dont know lol?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  24. QUESTION:
    What are cyst? And how do women get them?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in persons of any age. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Cysts vary in size; they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.

      Cysts can arise through a variety of processes in the body, including:

      - "Wear and tear" or simple obstructions to the flow of fluid
      - Infections
      - Tumors
      - Chronic inflammatory conditions
      - Genetic (inherited) conditions
      - Defects in developing organs in the embryo

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump". For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (x-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CAT Scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).

      There are hundreds of types of cysts that can arise in the body. Some of the more well-known types of cysts are:

      - Cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease)
      - Ovarian cysts
      - Cysts within the thyroid gland
      - Baker cyst (popliteal) behind the knee
      - Ganglion cysts of the joints and tendons
      - Cysts of the glands within the eyelid, termed chalazions
      - Sebaceous cysts of the small glands in the skin

      The majority of cysts are benign, but some may produce symptoms due to their size and/or location. Rarely, cysts can be associated with malignant tumors (cancers) or serious infections. If you're concerned about any abnormal swelling or "lump," talk to your doctor. He or she can recommend appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the cyst.

  25. QUESTION:
    lots of symptoms. is this endometriosis? please help because my doctors aren't?
    Hi, So about a month and a half ago I started getting weird cramping in my lower abdomen, I thought it was just pms cramping, although it felt a little different. Then I spotted for 2 days before my period, which has never happened to me before. Then I got my period, but it only lasted 2 days, which is very abnormal for me (it has always lasted 5 days), then I spotted a day or 2 after my period. After this, my cramping started spreading to my lower back. Then it spread to my groin. I get stabbing pains, and cramping pains in all these areas. I went to my gyno when it first happened, and she sent me for a pelvic ultrasound and a transvaginal ultrasound, and both came back fine. She also did 2 blood test and a urine test. They came back fine. After not really hearing back from the gyno, I saw my family doctor to see if maybe it was a back problem. He took 3 more vials of blood and sent me for a lower back xray, and a pelvic xray. They all came back fine. Then I went to my gyno again and she told me to get a ct scan on my pelvis. I couldn't wait because they pain gets worse every single day. So I went to the emergency room 2 days ago, and got 5 more vials of blood and got the ct scan done. Everything came back fine again. The pain gets worse everyday, and no medicine that has been prescribed to me has worked at all. I have taken muscle spasm meds, celebrex, tylenol with codeine, oxycodone, and percosets. And my period is not due for another week or so, and yesterday and today I started having pink spotting. Has anyone had these symptoms? I don't know what to do anymore because my doctor and my gyno seem to be pushing me off to the other, and neither seem to have any idea or concern of what is wrong with me.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endometriosis based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done, which is the only way to determine for sure whether you have endometriosis or not as no ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, blood test or any other test can diagnose endometriosis.

      I was suffering similar symptoms to the one's you are describing, although I experienced the symptoms throughout my entire cycle and when my periods came on, they were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I had really heavy bleeding and also feel pain that feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experienced pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year October by having a laparoscopy done and my gyn burned off all the endo implants and removed a small endometrioma (blood) cyst.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past year and a half (even before I was diagnosed) and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example. You could also have Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), which I also have and which can cause very similar symptoms and pelvic pain to that of the endo. They often are found to go hand in hand.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants. For IBS there are many treatments available as well such as changing your diet or your doctor could prescribe some medicine for it, which is what my doctor did for me. I was on 4 different brands of the birth control pill for about a year and 3 months before, during and after my endo diagnosis, however I stopped taking the pill in the beginning of September this year as I also have migraines and were experiencing too many migraines, which my doctor thought was caused by the pill and so I stopped. Ever since then, my periods have become much more painful and unbearable again, although I'm only having the severe pelvic pain and symptoms during my period and not throughout the entire month.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  26. QUESTION:
    My 2 year old has a bone cyst in his upper femur?
    2 year old has a bone cyst in his upper femer. He started limping 2 months ago but diodnt have any sort of fall or insident. He just stated limping then crawling. We never had any issue with him until now. He had an x-ray and we were told that he d fractured the bone. He spent 4 weeks in a cast from chest to toe and 2 weeks in a brace. He s out of the brace 2 weeks now but still is limping badly. We re back for another check up in 3 week time. He had an operation where the hospital broke the cyst and injected steroids. They did see some bone growth on the the x-ray on the day they let him out of the brace which we re told is positive. We re also told that he ll have issues until he is in his late teens and has stopped growing but will break the leg a lot over the years. There is also an issue with cyst being enormous and tight against the growth plate. Apparently this could cause serious issues if damaged. Love to hear from anyone who s down the line with a similar story.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, please, don t be panicky. Study it carefully and discuss with Ur family members/friends and implement it for a month. By His grace, let us wish, U shall be fine in a few weeks.

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of--------Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi s Sarcoma, etc., Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, severe hair loss [with excessive accumulated heat in the body], FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst* Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It's important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      2. Tumor* Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      1. Cure for Cyst----------- Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor---- Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children's bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful.

      3. Bone-enlargement of Mixture CF 3x, CP 3x or 12x and
      S 12x, 3 times daily.

      Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, U may see a general surgeon/local homeopath for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers on any health issue.
      Source: HEALTH IN UR HANDS [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  27. QUESTION:
    whats is a cyst?
    wat is a cyst whats are the differences between cysts and what does it look like and how do you get rid of it

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in persons of any age. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Cysts vary in size; they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.

      Signs and symptoms of cyst and how they are diagnosed: Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump". For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (x-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CAT Scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).

      Different types of cyst are:Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
      Boils
      Branchial Cyst
      Breast Lumps In Women
      Chalazion
      Cystic Fibrosis
      Cysts
      Fibrocystic Breast Disease
      Ganglion
      Ovarian Cysts
      Polycystic Kidney Disease
      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      Thyroid Nodules

  28. QUESTION:
    I think I might have an ovarian cyst.....HELP?
    so... for the past few years my ( what I think are my ovaries) always hurt, especially when I pee in the morning, cough really hard, sneeze, and during my period it is always the worst no matter if I take midol or pamprin. I have never really paid much attention to it and just thought it was no big deal. I recently quit all my sports I used to play, and am not as active as I used to be. Also I have noticed that having sex hurts and the pain has been getting worse. There are a lot of symptoms that are the same like sore breasts, and abdominal pain but I'm just not sure if I should go to the doctor yet or just see if it will eventually go away. I'm really scared to go to the doctor, I'm almost 19 years old and have never seen the gynecologist and it just really freaks me out.... can anyone lead me in the right direction, I'm just really confused and in pain and would really appreciate any kind of answers.... thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You should look into both Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Endometriosis.
      Don't be scared to go to the gynecologist. This is their job and they have seen plenty of women. I've never experienced any pain while being examined. Some things can be a bit uncomfortable, but just focus on the ceiling and think nice thoughts. It is over before you know it!
      Good luck!
      Edited to add: They will probably use a transvaginal ultrasound to look at your ovaries, instead of an x-ray.

  29. QUESTION:
    low libido, weight gain, food cravings, acne, irregular periods facial hair?
    i have all of the above plus moodiness, pain during sex sometimes, sharp pains during ovulation, extreme fatigue and my doctor told me it could be post partum depression that just turned on late, or depression and put me on zoloft. i have stopped taking the zoloft because the only thing it tends to be doing is making me clench my jaw more. now i am not one to make a big deal out of nothing, but does anyone have any idea what else could be going on with me and should i push for more tests? i did ask my thyroid level to be tested and it came out normal. any suggestions?... i am 21 years old, and i had my daughter 16 months ago
    thank you for your answers, but as i did point out, i asked my thyroid levels to be checked and they all came out normal

    • ANSWER:
      It maybe Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

      What are the symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      The symptoms of PCOS include:

      Irregular or no menstrual periods
      Acne
      Obesity, and
      Excess hair growth on face or other parts of your body, called hirsutism (her-suit-is-em)

      Other signs and symptoms of PCOS include:

      weight gain,
      oily skin,
      patches of dark skin on the back of your neck and other areas, called acanthosis nigricans (a-can-tho-sis ni-gri-cans)

      What causes polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      No one is quite sure what causes PCOS. Although women with PCOS often have a mother or sister with the condition, there is not enough scientific evidence to prove that the condition may be inherited. The ovaries of women with PCOS frequently contain a number of small cysts, hence the name poly (many) cystic ovarian syndrome. A similar number of cysts may occur in women without PCOS. Therefore, the cysts themselves do not seem to be the cause of the problem. A malfunction of the body's blood sugar control system (insulin system) is frequent in women with PCOS, and researchers believe that these abnormalities may be related to the development of PCOS. It is known that the ovaries of women with PCOS produce excess amounts of male hormone known as androgen. This excessive production of male hormones may be a result of the abnormalities in insulin production

      How is polycystic ovarian syndrome diagnosed?

      The diagnosis of PCOS is generally made on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms as discussed above. The doctor will want to exclude other illnesses that have similar features, such as low thyroid hormone blood levels (hypothyroidism) or elevated levels of a milk producing hormone (prolactin). Also, tumors of the ovary or adrenal glands can produce elevated male hormone (androgen) blood levels that cause acne or excess hair growth, mimicking symptoms of PCOS.

      Other laboratory tests can be helpful in making the diagnosis of PCOS. Serum levels of male hormones (DHEA and testosterone) may be elevated. However, levels of testosterone that are highly elevated are not unusual with PCOS and call for additional evaluation. Additionally, levels of a hormone released by the brain (LH) are elevated.

      Cysts are fluid filled sacs. The cysts in the ovaries can be identified with imaging technology. (However, as noted above, women without PCOS can have many cysts as well.) Ultrasound, which passes sound waves through the body to create a picture of the kidneys, is used most often. Ultrasound imaging employs no injected dyes or radiation and is safe for all patients including pregnant women. It can also detect cysts in the kidneys of a fetus. Because women without PCOS can have ovarian cysts, and because ovarian cysts are not part of the definition of PCOS, ultrasound is not routinely ordered to diagnose PCOS. The diagnosis is usually a clinical one based on the patient's history, physical examination, and laboratory testing.

      More powerful and expensive imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also can detect cysts, but they are generally reserved for situations where other conditions, such as ovarian or adrenal gland tumors are suspected. CT scans require x rays and sometimes injected dyes, which can be associated with some degree of complications in certain patients.

      I would suggest talking to your Dr. about this. It can result in Infertility & since you have just had a baby 16 months ago, possibly a hormonal imbalance post pregnancy has caused it. I would also suggest getting a Thyroid antibody titer blood test to look for Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. I have this & it is an autoimmune condition in which your body turns on itself and starts attacking the good thyroid cells, thus, putting you into a state of Hypothyroid but, it won't show up without the antibody test. You are way too young to be having these symptoms, if your Dr. isn't helpful you might try an Endocrinologist. They are really great when searching for hormone related problems or autoimmune issues. Good luck, hope you get an answer soon.

      EDIT: Ask for the Thyroid Antibody Test. THIS IS DIFFERENT THAN YOUR T3, T4, TSH test. This is an auto-immune anti-body test, it is not done normally in a Thyroid panel unless asked for or suspected as in a hereditary link.

      (I would bet your Dr. didn't do this test, when he did the Thyroid testing)

      Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are autoantibodies that develop in response to thyroid gland inflammation. TPO antibodies, in turn, cause thyroid inflammation to persist. Studies show that TPO antibodies:

      contribute to the development of postpartum thyroiditis
      contribute to autoimmune thyroid disease
      increase the risk of recurrent miscarriages
      are highly associated with postpartum depression
      are highly associated with fertility problems

  30. QUESTION:
    What cause cyst and how cyst form?
    I had cyst third times... most of it is being removed from surgery.... The surgery takes about 10 minutes. I can't believe they charge up to 5 grand for just 10 minutes surgery!!!

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in people of any age. Sometimes they may be felt as an abnormal or new lump or bump anywhere in the body. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Since cysts vary in size, they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.

      Cysts can arise through a variety of processes in the body, including

      * "wear and tear" or simple obstructions to the flow of fluid,

      * infections,

      * tumors,

      * chronic inflammatory conditions,

      * genetic (inherited) conditions, and

      * defects in developing organs in the embryo.

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump." For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (X-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CT scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).

      There are hundreds of types of cysts that can arise in the body. Some of the more well-known types of cysts are

      * cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease),

      * ovarian cysts,

      * cysts within the thyroid gland,

      * Baker cyst (popliteal cyst) behind the knee,

      * ganglion cysts of the joints and tendons,

      * cysts of the glands within the eyelid, termed chalazions, and

      * sebaceous cysts of the small glands in the skin.

      The majority of cysts are benign, but some may produce symptoms due to their size and/or location. Rarely, cysts can be associated with malignant tumors (cancers) or serious infections. If you're concerned about any abnormal swelling or "lump," talk to your doctor. He or she can recommend appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the cyst.

  31. QUESTION:
    Lower back pain? Im 13?
    Around my kidneys
    Ina girl
    Been around for a month
    On and off
    Only when I get up from a chair
    Snezze couch or of I move wrong when I'm sitting
    Sometimes when I'm sitting my tailbone is sore
    Is it a lower back cyst
    Or even ovarian cyst
    Btw my lower back and butt look ok
    hELP im only 13 and worried

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to a doctor. I had the same symptoms when I was 14, went though 5 months of physical therapy for my back before my 4th doctor recommended an MRI. I had an ovarian cyst that was pushing into my kidney and stopped my kidney from working. The cyst was as big as a women's basketball and weighed 7 pounds. If it is an internal problem such as a cyst or kidney problems you need to talk to your doctor. Even if it is a bone or muscle problem, your doctor can help point you in the right direction, be it x-rays, MRI, physical therapy or anything else.

  32. QUESTION:
    Do I have endometriosis?
    Hi, I'm 16 and I think I may have endometriosis...

    here are my symptoms:

    -heavy periods
    -extremely bad cramps
    -lower back pain
    -some pelvic pain during the month

    or could I have a cyst on my ovaries?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering the same symptoms as you are describing throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I had very heavy bleeding and also felt pain like someone was stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experience pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 by having a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like you said - an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  33. QUESTION:
    Problem with my ovaries? Now getting worried. Cancer or Cyst?
    Whilst I have a fairly good understanding of medical issues, I'm struggling to understand this one. I hope somewhere out there, one of you may be able to help me with info. I am in my 40's. I had a hysterectomy due to bad fibroids when I was in my early 30's. They left both ovaries, (well at least one) and my cervix. I have no children.
    The last few weeks, I have CONSTANT heavy pain in the ovary area. It's like bad period pain and includes sudden needle-sharp pains too. After sex, it gets worse...so that's not encouraging! I also need to wee more, but there's no pain associated with that. I am also really tired which is unlike me, have lost weight...I am only small anyway. There is no history of Cancer in the family.
    When I had my abdominal Hysterectomy, four weeks later, I was admitted with blood-poisoning and had to have another (vaginal, so 'inside' the second time) operation to drain an abcess that had formed on my bladder, so kind of had 2 Hysterectomies in 5 weeks. Soon got better after that though and haven't had any problems till recently.
    What I'm hoping to find out. Are my symptoms an Ovarian Cyst, or Cancer? The Doctor said I look too well for Cancer, which I thought a little stupid and uncaring.
    Obviously, I have visited the Doctor and am due for some tests within the next 3 weeks. This seems a long way away right now and I'm not sleeping well as I'm so worried. I love my life and really don't want it to be cancer. Oh and by the way, I refuse conventional HRT, I take a herbal alternative which does work well.

    • ANSWER:
      I think your doctor is just trying to make you feel better. But you really need an MRI, ultrasound and blood work _ CA 125. Your symptoms could be an ovarian cyst, cancer, or a bladder problem. There is no easy route. Do step by step elimination until they discover what the problem is. Hang in there. When I had breast cancer, I had to go thru a battery of tests to see if I could withstand surgery and chemotherapy - they had to see if my heart was strong enough, had the cancer spread to my lungs or chest. Everything involved an x-ray, or dye injection or some other test. Just don't miss any appts and good luck!!

  34. QUESTION:
    Question about endometriosis?
    When my period is due i get really really bad pain, i get hot flushes, headaches, unbelievable backache and stomach ache which is sometimes quite 'stabby' feeling, and the last two times i felt like i could pass out.
    I was on birth control for a while when i was with my boyfriend but then we broke up and i decided to come off it, i had forgotten to take it for a while (no need at that point) and then decided to start again but after the first pill i suddenly felt really depressed and realised that it had been makin me feel like that every time i had taken it after having forgotten for a while so i decided to not take it until my next doctor appointment and ask to try another type. Anyway in the meantime my painful periods came back but a lot lot worse than they had been before i'd been on the pill.

    Anyway i kind of always assumed everyone has worse ones at different times but i was in college when the last pain came on (day before my period actually started) and my tutor asked if i was alright (guess i didnt look it lol) and i said yeah just girl stuff, then she told me she knew what that was like she had endometriosis.

    Well obviously i didnt want to start asking her loads of questions about it because although we have a pretty good friendship she is still my teacher, but i wondered if there is a chance i could have that? I dont want to go to the doctors and look silly if only older women get it lol. I basically just wondered what your thoughts were about it and if i should go get checked out for it.... I dont even really know what it is.
    I'm 19 by the way, forgot to say above... I thought i sounded like i could have it but i always thought that women who had it experienced the symptoms pretty much all the time and mine tend to come on only a couple days before- although i was getting cramps for a few days a couple weeks ago and thought i was going to come on but then didnt for another two weeks.

    Thanks for your answer pretzypie, i'm lookin at couple of the sites now...

    A couple more things, whats involved in a laproscopy? Is it a scan or needles or operation?! And also (sorry if this sounds stupid) but would a doctor look *down there* if i went and asked to be checked for it?
    And can it make you infertile??

    I have to admit, i am something of a doctor hater lol, i get very nervous whenever i have to go so hardly ever do unless i'm reaaally ill and forced to by someone...!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering some of the same symptoms as you are describing throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed.

      I have had quite heavy bleeding and also the pain that feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experience pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year October by having a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with a doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis.

      You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  35. QUESTION:
    Pelvic and period pain, possible endometriosis?
    My periods used to be relatively painless, but over the past few years and especially the last few months, I've been having unbearable pelvic pain. I kinow what menstrual cramps feel like, but these are different. The pain is really sudden and sharp and sometimes it gets so bad that I scream or cry uncontrollably and double over. I went to the Gynecologist and she didn't say anything about endometriosis, she just prescribed me some birth control pills. I have Fibromyalgia, a disease involving pain in muscles. I really think I have endometriosis, what do you think?
    I'm almost 18. I've had my period for 5 years, and only in the last 2 has it been painful.

    My family doctor suspected an ovarian cyst so I got an ultrasound but they didn't find anything.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering the same symptoms as you are describing throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I had quite heavy bleeding and also experienced pain that felt like someone was stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experienced pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 by having a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  36. QUESTION:
    Possible Endometriosis?
    My husband and I have been trying to conceive for 3 years. I am 21 and have very irregular periods and PCOS. I sometimes go 4 or 5 months with out having a period. For the last couple months I have gotten a period every month. I am not on any kind of medication for the PCOS to regulate me because my DR says that I am young and she wants to make sure we do the best thing for me. I dont think my age really matters but anyways. For the last couple months when I have gotten my period I have had these horrible cramps. They are so bad that I cant walk or move. All I can do is lay in bed and cry. I have had tons of pelvic and vaginal sonograms. Wouldnt this show up on the scan? My last vaginal sonogram was in June and she said that everything was fine and that I was actually ovulating when I went. Is that a sign off endometroisis? I'm very worried and starting to think that maybe I cant have kids. My husband has had his sperm count checked and everything is fine. So the problem is with me =[ .
    For 3 years.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering the same symptoms as you are describing throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I have had very heavy bleeding and also the pain that feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experience pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year when I had a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together, which could be the PCOS or something else that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      I hope this helped you somewhat. If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  37. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of endometriosis?
    Hello, Im 20 and for the last few months I have been feeling bloated, I would have bad lower back pain, and leg pain, and severe cramps, it was horrible. My doctor felt a lot of pressure in my stomach so she sent me to get a trans-vaginal ultrasound along with a abdominal one also. The results came back normal, then she sent me to get an x ray of my abdomen and that came back normal again. She said that she had no evidence to believe that it would be ovarian cancer or a cyst. she assured me not to worry about cancer, but im still kind of worried, i know its rare, but its still possible. She said that this could be the cause of endometriosis, but she said the only way to diagnose it was to do surgery, So what are the symptoms of endometriosis, and should I not worry about ovarian cancer because my test came back normal? Thanks for you help.

    P.S. I know im not pregnant!! Thanks again!

    • ANSWER:

  38. QUESTION:
    Endometriosis?
    I think I might have Endometriosis. Every time before I start my cycle I get severe cramps to the point that I faint and I scream because they are so painful. I have a very high pain tolerance too. I throw up and also have diarrhea. I saw that all these were symptoms of Endometriosis, and I was just wondering if anyone expierenced the same kind of thing or if anyone thought I had Endo. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering the same symptoms as you are describing throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I have had quite heavy bleeding and also the pain that feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experience pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year by having a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site: http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck! :)

  39. QUESTION:
    Suspected endometriosis but on birth control?
    I'm 26 yrs old and have been having severe cramps in my left side for over 6 months. I've been to see my doctor on numerous occasions and have ended up in A&E twice with the pain.

    On my most recent visit to A&E the doc told me she suspected I have endometriosis. I have had 2 ultrasound scans, blood and urine tests and all have come back normal. From research I have discovered taking birth control is one option in helping but i've been on the pill nearly 10 years. Could the A&E doc have it wrong??

    My symptoms are:
    Severe cramps in my lower left side not following any pattern with my cycle
    Cramps in my lower back
    Occasional bloatedness
    Fatigue
    Loss of appetite leading to weight loss
    Generally feeling off form and somethings not right

    Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering the same symptoms as you are describing throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I had quite heavy bleeding and also felt pain that feels like someone was stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experienced pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 by having a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  40. QUESTION:
    Can a Pelvic Transabdominal and endovaginal sonogram show endometriosis?
    My doctor asked me for doing a Pelvic Transabdominal and endovaginal sonogram for checking if I do have a cyst. He didn't feel anything touching. I've had problems with my bowel movements and I thought it was because of antibiotics. Now it is working, but it's still a little painful before, during and after the bowl movements. I'm going to a general doctor to do a check up and see if it's just a bowel problem or something else other than gynecologic . My gynecologist said to do the sonogram right after my next period. I was wondering if I do the Pelvic Transabdominal and endovaginal sonogram, is it possible to find out if I have endometriosis? I've felt something contracting inside when I'm urinating (not cistitis pain) and/or have bowel movements. Now that I'm not constipated anymore it hurts much less, but I'm still bloated and have some cramps eventually, even if I don't eat too much.
    I'm 27 years old and I stopped my birth control in October, and after that I started to have lots of pain that goes and back.
    Also, if is something with my intestines, this type of sonogram can find too?
    PS: I had never felt anything like that before in my periods or whenever, that's why I'm worried.
    And sometimes I feel something even when I'm sitting or walking. It's is not pain, it's something, that sometimes can be a sharp pain.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endometriosis based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done, which is the only way to determine for sure whether you have endometriosis or not as no ultrasound, CT scan, MRI or other test can diagnose endometriosis.

      I was suffering similar symptoms to the one's you are describing, although I experienced the symptoms throughout my entire cycle and when my periods came on, they were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I had really heavy bleeding and also feel pain that feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experienced pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year October by having a laparoscopy done and my gyn burned off all the endo implants and removed a small endometrioma (blood) cyst.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past year and a half (even before I was diagnosed) and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example. You could also have Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), which I also have and which can cause very similar symptoms and pelvic pain to that of the endo. They often are found to go hand in hand.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants. For IBS there are many treatments available as well such as changing your diet or your doctor could prescribe some medicine for it, which is what my doctor did for me. I was on 4 different brands of the birth control pill for about a year and 3 months before, during and after my endo diagnosis, however I stopped taking the pill in the beginning of September this year as I also have migraines and were experiencing too many migraines, which my doctor thought was caused by the pill and so I stopped. Ever since then, my periods have become much more painful and unbearable again, although I'm only having the severe pelvic pain and symptoms during my period and not throughout the entire month.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gyn about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consultation.html

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometriosis.htm
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  41. QUESTION:
    Painful Bowel Movements during Menstruation?
    Is it normal to have painful bowel movements during menstruation? Or painful intercourse during menstruation? Cervix pain when using tampons during menstruation?

    I know these are signs of endometriosis..but I have always (at least as long as I can remember) had these symptoms.

    I have had uterine type pain, and cramping, as well as somewhat irregular bleeding for a while now. Three ultrasounds...etc etc and no results. My symptoms are pretty consistent with endo...

    Can someone who has Endo help me out..I know it can be a long diagnostic process...what should I do to get the diagnosis/or get it ruled out? I'm utterly frustrated with getting sent home with pain meds but no diagnosis :(

    And is it normal to having painful BM's etc. during your period?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endometriosis based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done, which is the only way to determine for sure whether you have endometriosis or not as no ultrasound, CT scan, MRI or other test can diagnose endometriosis.

      I was suffering similar symptoms to the one's you are describing, although I experienced the symptoms throughout my entire cycle and when my periods came on, they were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I had really heavy bleeding and also feel pain that feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experienced pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year October by having a laparoscopy done and my gyn burned off all the endo implants and removed a small endometrioma (blood) cyst.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past year and a half (even before I was diagnosed) and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example. You could also have Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), which I also have and which can cause very similar symptoms and pelvic pain to that of the endo. They often are found to go hand in hand.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants. For IBS there are many treatments available as well such as changing your diet or your doctor could prescribe some medicine for it, which is what my doctor did for me. I was on 4 different brands of the birth control pill for about a year and 3 months before, during and after my endo diagnosis, however I stopped taking the pill in the beginning of September this year as I also have migraines and were experiencing too many migraines, which my doctor thought was caused by the pill and so I stopped. Ever since then, my periods have become much more painful and unbearable again, although I'm only having the severe pelvic pain and symptoms during my period and not throughout the entire month.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to consult with your doctor/gynaecologist about your options to have the laparoscopy or to find a gynaecologist/specialist that knows a lot about and has a lot of experience with diagnosing and treating women with endometriosis. You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consultation.html

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometriosis.htm
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  42. QUESTION:
    pains in lower stomach?
    any answers on pains in lower stomach plus back pain??? never had it before and these pains are alittle worse then period pains
    i am late for my period also and i no what period pains feel like and these fell different they have been going for bout 5-6 days now so not sure what it could be may be it is period pains..

    • ANSWER:
      Well, first of all, take a pregnancy test just in case.

      When you are certain that you're not pregnant, maybe you should consider seeing a doctor? You might have an ovarian cyst. That's just a guess; I'm not a medical doctor and obviously I wouldn't be able to diagnose you over the internet even if I were...

      The reason I mention ovarian cysts is that I had very similar symptoms to you and that's what my problem was. Many women get them. They're not dangerous unless they burst (can be VERY painful and can even damage ovaries). It took years to get it figured out, because it was hard to see these cysts using X-rays and other methods. So be persistent and keep mentioning the possibility of a cyst if the doctor can't find anything else wrong. Good luck.

  43. QUESTION:
    How can they tell?
    Hows can they tell the difference between a cyst and tumour on an ultrasound? What charaterstics do they have that differ from one another?

    • ANSWER:
      What is a cyst?

      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in persons of any age. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Cysts vary in size; they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.
      What are the causes of a cyst?

      Cysts can arise through a variety of processes in the body, including:

      * "Wear and tear" or simple obstructions to the flow of fluid
      * Infections
      * Tumors
      * Chronic inflammatory conditions
      * Genetic (inherited) conditions
      * Defects in developing organs in the embryo

      What are the signs and symptoms of a cyst and how are they diagnosed?

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump". For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (x-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CAT Scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).
      What are the types of cysts?

      There are hundreds of types of cysts that can arise in the body. Some of the more well-known types of cysts are:

      * Cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease)
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Cysts within the thyroid gland
      * Baker cyst (popliteal) behind the knee
      * Ganglion cysts of the joints and tendons
      * Cysts of the glands within the eyelid, termed chalazions
      * Sebaceous cysts of the small glands in the skin

      The majority of cysts are benign, but some may produce symptoms due to their size and/or location. Rarely, cysts can be associated with malignant tumors (cancers) or serious infections. If you're concerned about any abnormal swelling or "lump," talk to your doctor. He or she can recommend appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the cyst.
      What is the treatment for a cyst?

      The treatment for a cyst depends upon the cause of the cyst along with its location. Cysts that are very large and result in symptoms due to their size may be surgically removed. Sometimes the fluid contained within a cyst can be drained, or aspirated, by inserting a needle or catheter into the cyst cavity, resulting in collapse of the cyst. Radiologic imaging may be used for guidance in draining (aspirating) cyst contents if the cyst is not easily accessible.

      If there is any suspicion that a cyst is cancerous, the cyst is generally removed by surgery, or a biopsy is taken of the cyst wall (capsule) to rule out malignancy. In certain cases, aspirated fluid from a cyst is examined under a microscope to determine if cancer cells are present in the cyst.

      If a cyst arises as part of a chronic medical condition (for example, in polycystic ovary syndrome or fibrocystic breast disease), treatment is generally directed at the underlying medical condition.

      not sure what type of tumor you are referring to but if you go to www.webmd.com you can read more information on cysts and tumors. Hope this helps.

  44. QUESTION:
    Something serious or am I just crazy?
    Here's my story (bear with me): For the past week and a half I have been having flu symptoms (chills, dizziness, nausea, abdominal pain) so of course I went to the doctor. Over the past week she has taken blood work, stool sample, urine sample, chest X-Ray, CT scan of abdomen, ultrasound of abdomen (I have history of ovarian cysts), and influenza test. All tests have come back normal. White blood cells were slightly elevated but nothing out of range. Went to the ER one morning about 4 days back and they couldn't find anything but due to my horrible cough, diagnosed me with bronchitis. They gave me antibiotic and sent me on my way. Since taking the antibiotic, I've been quite worse. Called my doctor today, she wants me to continue on antibiotic. I've been having head pressure, ringing in the ears/slight hearing loss, abdominal pains, chills, night sweats, insomnia, low grade "fever" (99.4) for 8 days, period has not come for almost 2 months (doctor knows that too and my ultrasound came back normal aka no cysts)......

    Thing is, I have severe panic/anxiety disorder. Could I somehow be concocting all of these symptoms in my head? Even the temperature, chills and night sweats?

    Again, ALL my tests have come back normal. There is really no reason I should have missed menstruation for almost 2 months or be having the symptoms I'm having now. I just feel so awful. Too sick to even get out of bed. Living off Gatorade for 8 days now.

    Am I just crazy? o____0

    • ANSWER:
      I think it is rare for symptoms to actually develop when you have anxiety disorder, especially when you have all of the symptoms you do. I would go to another doctor for a second opinion. This doesn't seem right.

  45. QUESTION:
    Right sided abdominal pain?
    I have a pain on the mid-right side of my abdomen. It intensifies and lessons throughout the day. Sometimes I can bear the pain and then other times it hurts so bad I have to walk hunched over because standing straight gives me sharp pains on the right side. It also hurts when I push my belly button in. I was wondering if anyone has had this and knows what it could be. Also when I lie on my right side it hurts bad and takes me awhile to get up. I am a 32 year old female if that helps.

    • ANSWER:
      Could be your appendix (I doubt it though as you couldn't stand to press on it) or also an ovarian cyst. See your doctor.
      With appendicitis you want to lie absolutely still; later stages include severe vomiting (which strangely enough is not accompanied by diarrhea, because it sure feels like the flu from hell so where are the trots?)
      My surgeon's sure-fire test for appendicitis (after the ultrasounds and x-rays, of course) was to lift my right foot and give it a sound thump on the heel. He says when it's the appendix they "go for his throat every time" (I did)
      A year later when I had an ovarian cyst rupture I'd have sworn the man failed to take the appendix out...symptoms were very similar but milder with the cyst.

  46. QUESTION:
    Lyme Disease? Unexplained symptoms.. Help?
    I am begging for some input/advise for what could be wrong with me. My doctor hasn't been able to come up with an explaination for my systems...

    I am a 22 yr old female. I have an 8 month old and a 3 year old. I have had no previous health issues, no anxiety issues, no surgeries. I am not on any medications. I do have the nexplanon birth control in my left arm. It has been there for 7 months.

    I have had a chest x-ray and ECHO, MRI of head and neck, and an abdominal CT scan. Also some basic blood tests.

    Nothing has been found except for a 6cm ovarian cyst (the kind with teeth & hair). Which I was told is not believed to be causing any of my problems. Also I at some point in time I must have had mono, but the virus is not active at this time.

    It all started a month and a half ago I was suddenly really sick. I was weak, nauseous, had diarrhea, and generally feeling unwell. I had no appitite what so ever but felt excessively very thirsty. Now most of the virus-like symptoms have ended, but this is what has been going on ever since, for weeks and its getting scary:

    *Numbness, tingling and burning sensations most commonly in left palm, fingers and arm. Also in feet, legs, and right fingers/palm/arm.
    *Joint/musle pain in fingers, palms, forearms and elbows. (Also more common on left side) Chest & rib pain.
    *Stiff and painfull neck, pain in jaw and pressure/pain under chin.
    *Almost constant tremor, sometimes slight and sometimes very noticeable. (Tremor is worse in right arm/hand) Can often be felt severely in chest while resting.
    *Episodes of lightheadedness and feeling faint.
    *Diarrhea and stomach cramps often shortly after eating or after an episode of feeling faint.
    *New acid reflux.
    *Pounding heartbeat.
    *Burning sensation in abdomen and chest.
    *Muscle spasms/twitching.
    *Headaches in back of skull or in forehead/eyes causing slightly blurred vision.
    *Loss of appetite.
    *Feeling full much more quickly and bloated.
    *New red sore on gums
    *Food tasting differently

    • ANSWER:
      I hope the below link may help you out

  47. QUESTION:
    What does PCOS stand for?

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      What is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), also known by the name Stein-Leventhal syndrome, is a hormonal problem that causes women to have a variety of symptoms.

      What are the symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      The symptoms of PCOS include:

      1. Irregular or no menstrual periods

      2. Acne

      3. Obesity, and

      4. Excess hair growth

      Other signs and symptoms of PCOS include:

      * weight gain,

      * acne,

      * oily skin,

      * dandruff,

      * infertility,

      * skin discolorations,

      * high cholesterol levels,

      * elevated blood pressure, and

      * abnormal hair growth and distribution.

      Any of the above symptoms and signs may be absent in PCOS, with the exception of irregular or no menstrual periods. All women with PCOS will have irregular or no menstrual periods. Women who have PCOS do not regularly ovulate; that is, they do not release an egg every month. This is why they do not have regular periods.

      What causes polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      No one is quite sure what causes PCOS. Although women with PCOS often have a mother or sister with the condition, there is not enough scientific evidence to prove that the condition may be inherited. The ovaries of women with PCOS frequently contain a number of small cysts, hence the name poly (many) cystic ovarian syndrome. A similar number of cysts may occur in women without PCOS. Therefore, the cysts themselves do not seem to be the cause of the problem. A malfunction of the body's blood sugar control system (insulin system) is frequent in women with PCOS, and researchers believe that these abnormalities may be related to the development of PCOS. It is known that the ovaries of women with PCOS produce excess amounts of male hormone known as androgen. This excessive production of male hormones may be a result of the abnormalities in insulin production.

      How is PCOS diagnosed?

      The diagnosis of PCOS is generally made on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms as discussed above. The doctor will want to exclude other illnesses that have similar features, such as low thyroid hormone blood levels (hypothyroidism) or elevated levels of a milk-producing hormone (prolactin). Also, tumors of the ovary or adrenal glands can produce elevated male hormone (androgen) blood levels that cause acne or excess hair growth, mimicking symptoms of PCOS.

      Other laboratory tests can be helpful in making the diagnosis of PCOS. Serum levels of male hormones (DHEA and testosterone) may be elevated. However, levels of testosterone that are highly elevated are not unusual with PCOS and call for additional evaluation. Additionally, levels of a hormone released by the brain (LH) are elevated.

      Cysts are fluid-filled sacs. The cysts in the ovaries can be identified with imaging technology. (However, as noted above, women without PCOS can have many cysts as well.) Ultrasound, which passes sound waves through the body to create a picture of the kidneys, is used most often. Ultrasound imaging employs no injected dyes or radiation and is safe for all patients including pregnant women. It can also detect cysts in the kidneys of a fetus. Because women without PCOS can have ovarian cysts, and because ovarian cysts are not part of the definition of PCOS, ultrasound is not routinely ordered to diagnose PCOS. The diagnosis is usually a clinical one based on the patient's history, physical examination, and laboratory testing.

      More powerful and expensive imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also can detect cysts, but they are generally reserved for situations where other conditions, such as ovarian or adrenal gland tumors are suspected. CT scans require x-rays and sometimes injected dyes, which can be associated with some degree of complications in certain patients.

      What conditions can be associated with PCOS?

      Women with PCOS are at a higher risk for a number of illnesses, including high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer of the uterus (endometrial cancer). Much of this risk can be reversed by exercise and weight loss. Additionally, it is important for women with PCOS to have regular periods. If a woman does not have regular periods, her risk of cancer of the uterus (endometrial cancer) is increased. Medication is generally prescribed to induce regular periods. Obesity is a complication of PCOS. Reducing the medical risks from PCOS-associated obesity requires hard work on the part of the woman with PCOS and is often frustrating. For more information about obesity and management, please read the Obesity article.

      What treatments are available for PCOS?

      Treatment of PCOS depends partially on the woman's stage of life. For younger women who desire birth control, the birth control pill, especially those with low "androgenic" (male hormone-like) side effects can

  48. QUESTION:
    Lump in neck and possible Anxiety/Depression?
    Hello, about 12 days ago i have found a small, soft, painless lump on the right side of my neck, it is barely visible. Just a day or two before i found i had pretty heavy fever for about 2 days and i also went outside not dressed much when it was pretty cold. At the time when i found the lump i was feeling pretty fine all around. A week later i went to my doctor to check the lump out, he didnt say much just told me to get and x-ray, which is i am yet to do on monday. Ever since i went to doctor i have been feeling pretty worried as he didnt really explain anything to me and i have been researching a lot. In past few days i have been feeling hot in my head and eye, i have also been feeling pretty tired most of the time and im getting enought sleep. I also seem to have lost about 1kg of weight and i dont really have an appeptite. I have researched this sympthoms and the result came up as possible Lymphoma. I am rather scared right now and very worried, i dont know what to do, my x-ray is on monday and then i need to wait about another week for the result. Should i go to the emergency to get checked out? I just woke up today and i already feel kind of shaken up and my body is feeling rather hot. One of my thoughts is that i have just read a lot of terrible things that can be associated with the lump that i have and now i have this vision in my mind, which only making it worse for me. Also i forgot to mention during the period that i have had my lump so far, it hasnt really changed at all and i dont have temperature. If it is Lymphoma i dont want to waste any time and i want to get the results as fast as i can. What should i do? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Every lymph node enlargement can not be lymphoma nor cancerous. U may study and comply with, for total relief much before U get Ur X-ray results. Or U may as well postpone X-ray by a week or two on trying out the safe formula mentioned here under.

      ***Many of the questioners on this most benevolent Yahoo Answers site don't react. If every questioner is benefited and reacts, there shall be more and more enlightened & benevolent souls to help mass visitors.***

      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.

      Everyone MUST be aware of--------Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi s Sarcoma, etc., Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst* Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It's important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      2. Tumor* Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      1. Cure for Cyst----------- Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor---- Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children's bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, prudent* to see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers on any health issue.
      Source: HEALTH IN UR HANDS [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  49. QUESTION:
    Is menstrual spotting and an early period signs of endometriosis?
    in January of '08, I started experiencing menstrual spotting, once for 2 days 2 weeks before. 2 months ago, i started to spot more frequently, once after and 1 before, for 2 or 3 days. I have a really heavy painful flow when i do start to menstruate. For pain, I have to 2 800mg ibuprofen to bring the pain to a point where it's bearable. I've been advised by both an ER doctor and the school nurse, before i graduated, to get checked for endometriosis and to get birth control.and not to mention that I just got my period about week and a half early messes my schedule up. are these really signs of endometriosis?

    the other thing is, is that my mother is completely against birth control and thinks i would use it as an excuse to have sex even tough I'm not a virgin anymore anyway. not to mention that she thinks that menstrual pain is normal and that I'm just being a baby about it. I'm underage for a whole month still. what should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you could very well have endo based on your symptoms. However, you cannot know for sure until you have a laparoscopy done.

      I was suffering from severe pelvic cramping throughout my entire cycle, although my periods were so intense and painful that I could hardly get out of bed. I have had very heavy bleeding too and the pain feels like someone is stabbing me with a knife around my ovaries. I also experience pain with intercourse, pain with urination, pain with bowel movements, had lower back pain and fatigue.

      I had many tests done, which included ultrasounds, CT-scan, blood tests, swabs, papsmears, X-rays etc, for months (almost a year) and all of those tests came back "normal" and didn't show anything. I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis last year October by having a laparoscopy done.

      If you do in fact have endo then your best medicine is research. You have to be well informed and be proactive in your treatment process. I have done a lot of research over the past few months and have talked to many women who were told they "may" have endo or that they do have endo.

      Until you have the laparoscopy done and your gyno says for sure that you do have endo, don't get too concerned yet and don't drive yourself crazy worrying about it. You could have another gynaecological problem all together. Something that is far more treatable like an ovarian cyst as ovarian cysts can sometimes be missed even with ultrasound, especially if a sonography technician is not experienced enough to know about ovarian cysts and sometimes ovarian cysts can t be seen on ultrasound due to their location behind the ovary for example.

      There is no cure for endo and the only major medical treatments treat the symptoms itself not the disease. In other words pain management through drugs etc or surgery to burn/excise the endo implants.

      The first thing I would recommend you do is to talk with your Mom and tell her that you are not being a baby, that the pain you are feeling is not in your head and that you would like to see a doctor for further evaluation to find out what is causing your severe period pains, because it is not normal! Then, I would recommend you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist about your options to see what they say and if possible to have the laparoscopy to see whether you do infact have endometriosis.

      You may want to make a list of questions you have that you can discuss with him/her when you see them (have a look for some example questions at the following site:

      http://www.endometriosis.org/first-consu...

      Underneath is a link to some websites where you can find some great information:

      http://www.endometriosassn.org
      http://www.endocenter.org
      http://www.endometriosis.org
      http://www.gynsecondopinion.com/endometr...
      http://www.endometriosis.org.au/
      http://www.endo-resolved.com/symptoms.ht...
      http://adam.about.com/reports/000074_3.h...

      If you have any further questions you can email me direct, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Good luck. :)

  50. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have pcos?
    Well I am on clomid and this is our 3rd round the first 2 show that I didnt ovulate.So this month they raised the dosage to 150, I have had a hsg test and it was good my hubby had his check up and he waqs good.I was just searching the web and was wondering how do you know you have pcos? Would my obgyn have told me if I had it already? would the hsg test shown it? I was having a pain in my lower abodomien but she took a ultra sound and told me it was just a sprained muslce and that I could see a Pelvic threapist? ?Can anyone give me some advice? and if you have a success story about clomid i would appreciate reading it to cheer me up

    • ANSWER:
      I don't see how the HSG test would reveal whether you have PCOS or not. This test is an x-ray of your uterus and fallopian tubes. PCOS is an endocrine disorder (hormonal) that affects a woman's reproductive system. One of the symptoms are cysts on the ovaries, thus the name Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. However, the hormonal imbalance causes a multitude of symptoms, such as weight gain, excessive hair growth, trouble losing weight, irregular periods, etc. Typically diagnosis would be more dependent on your medical history, lab tests and a physical exam.

      I think this topic overview from Women's Health on WebMD is one of the best I've read. It should help you decide if your difficulty ovulating may be caused by PCOS and whether you need to bring it up with your doctor.

      http://women.webmd.com/tc/polycystic-ovary-syndrome-pcos-symptoms


what are the symptoms for ovarian cysts x-ray