What Causes A Cysts On The Can Fallopian Tubes Be Removed And Ovaries Kept

Although there is no known cure for Alzheimers, there are a number of treatments which can be used to ensure the symptoms are kept under control and the sufferer's overall standard of life for the duration of the condition is as comfortable as it can possibly be. It still remains on the whole a mysterious condition, with very little known about its causes or the precise nature of its effects. Alzheimers disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the patient to suffer from progressive intellectual deterioration.

Various associations realted to the disease are usually non-profit organizations that focus on matters related to it; the primary concern is to develop a treatment for this disorder. In mid-2002, a hospital clinic in Portugal investigated to see if there was a link between drinking coffee and the reduction of the risk of developing Alzheimers disease. A university clinic located in Berlin, Germany, looked at the relationship between consumption of coffee and the delay in the onset of Alzheimers disease or reduction in the rate of progression of the disease.

At this time there are no known cures for the disease, but there are some medications and have shown promise in at least slowing the disease's progression, and medical science is optimistic about research into the field. Although there is no known definitive cause of the condition, there are many theories and tests currently ongoing to help unlock the key to this degenerative disease. It is thought that there are a number of factors which may help in forming an Alzheimers diagnosis, such as family history and any previous serious head injuries, which may indicate a likelihood of the condition.

The vast majority of patients suffering from the condition receive their Alzheimers help and care in their own home by a family member or friend. There are researches that suggest that Alzheimers disease may be hereditary, meaning if someone in the family has acquired this condition, other members are at risk. Past studies showed that people who play chess on a regular basis are at a significantly lower risk of falling victim to the condition as compared to the general population.

These behaviors are seen even in individuals that were shy, timid, or passive people prior to developing the disease. An Alzheimers patient displays unpredictable mood changes not typical of the person prior to his disease. Doctors have discovered that there are changes in the brain found in a patient diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimers disease affects the mind in such a way, that the person (at least in our situation) cannot function in normal situations. A person who has the disorder experiences trouble in completing a sentence. There are some Alzheimers medicines which have been proven to temporarily delay the process of mental deterioration.

A person with Alzheimers Disease might forget the simplest words, misplace things and have a loss of mental functioning including language, recognition of family, reading and writing. There are other more natural alternatives, including herbal preparations (gingko, lycopodium, salvia,) thyroid supplement (when hypothyroidism is the cause), nutritional supplementation using whole food preparations of vitamins such as inositol and lecithin, and a specific product called Cholodin which combines choline and several other nutrients (choline, phosphatidylcholine, methionine, inositol, and various B vitamins and antioxidants. Mutated genes that mingle with each other and with non-genetic factors cause AD, and the only recognized gene is one form of a protein called apolipoprotein E (ApoE).

Researchers do not yet fully recognize what is the actual cause of Alzheimer's disease. There are no actual tests that can be administered to a person who suffers from Alzheimer's disease pre-mortem.

The doctors don't know for sure - hopefully one day they will.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst and leg pain?
    I am 33 years old. have stage 4 endometriosis and polycystic ovarian syndrome, I have had 3 laproscopic precedures to "untwist" my ovaries etc (they keep moving and sticking to the wall), as well as to remove endometriosis. My fallopian tubes were removed several years ago, and I have since had one child through IVF. For the last few months I have begun getting cysts which cause incredible pain. Last night I woke to a stabbing pain, which I assume is another cyst, but there is also pain radiating down my legs and causing numbness in the calf area. Should I just assume this is like all my other cysts and just wait it out, or does the leg pain make it a possible different diagnosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Are you on birth control pills? If so, the leg pain could be a blood clot.

  2. QUESTION:
    Will I have Surgical Menopause?
    I am having my left ovary removed due to a dermoid cyst and my left fallopian tube and having my right fallopian tube taken out due to pain ont he right side. I was thinking of asking my doctor if i could just have a partial hysterectomy. I am keeping the right ovary cause its good and don't want to go into menopause at 23. I am young, i already have two children and plan to have no more. My question is will i go into menopuase if i only have the one ovary . I am calling her tommorow to ask, this surgery is kinda of sudden, went to doc tuesday for blood work results and now i am having it monday. I wasnt suppose to plan it till May 4th. So kinda wanted opinions. All comments are greatly appreciated

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe, maybe not. That is, if you leave in one ovary yet have the partial hysterectomy (by which i assume you mean getting your uterus removed), then you've put a great deal of stress on that one ovary--the blood supply is reduced, because anatomically, the ovaries are almost part of the uterus in terms of blood supply and some ligaments and such. That means that women who have had a hysterectomy, even with two ovaries, go through menopause earlier. And the effect is greater the younger one is when one has the surgery. Some even find the shock to the ovary is great enough that it stops working right away, or works for only a short time, then stops, meaning surgical menopause, basically. Most women who have hysterectomies have it in their 40s or older, anyway, so they're closer to menopause. You're further away from menopause, so the effect is possibly worsened. There are also a lot of side effects to getting a hysterectomy, like reduced ability to orgasm and less intense orgasms, incontinence, risk of vaginal prolapse, and, well, here' s a whole list: http://www.hersfoundation.com/effects.html . So you can risk all that if you want, but I personally don't advise it. Right now, you're taking your organs for granted--you don't know what it's like to be without them and don't realize how much they do for your well-being and health. It's doubtful, anyway, that a doctor will remove a uterus in a 23 year old, unless there are major problems.

      and such changes are irreversible so even if you regret it later, nothing can be done.

  3. QUESTION:
    I just "passed" two white blood clots. What causes it?
    I recently had surgery to remove two cysts out of my fallopian tubes and one off my ovary. I hadn't had a period since until about 3 and a half weeks ago. Before my surgery I hadn't had one in 4 or 5 months. I was just lightly spotting for two weeks and then suddenly started bleeding really heavily. About an hour ago I noticed two dime size white clots. I'm not sure what causes them. My mother suggested it could be a miscarriage but I'm on the depo shot and the doctors told me that due to my surgery it would be very rare for me even be able to get pregnant. I had a miscarriage 9 months before my surgery but never noticed anything different. I hurt like I did then but that's about it. Since the doctors said I couldn't get pregnant and that the shot would keep me from having a period I'm very concerned as to what is going on. However I don't want to have to make another appointment if there is nothing wrong and this is normal.

    • ANSWER:

  4. QUESTION:
    I have severe chronic endometriosis.?
    I had my fallopian tubes removed 4 yrs ago when they 1st discoverd it.It had ravaged my tubes.They recomended a complete hystorectomy.I have since found out that my uterus is hugely enlarged.my uterus lining is extremely thick.I have a uterus that is tilted to the back and over to the right with multiple cysts on my ovaries.every month I notice that I get weaker and weaker...sicker and sicker.Over 4 yrs it has progressed to the point that I have 1 good week per month that I am not swelled up like I am 8 months pregnant,hurt severly,have bowel trouble and only poop normal after I have started my period for a cple days.(I think the huge uterus keeps my bowels blocked off).the rest of the month I am in this kind of condition.I feel myself getting weaker and weaker.my immune system is down very low.I catch any kind of flue,virus,etc...that I come in contact with,I keep dehydrating vey easily,I am so weak and tired all the time that I sleep most of the time.is this disorder causing all of these symptoms?can it eventually kill me?

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, if you were advised to have the hysterectomy, why didn't you? You were losing your fallopian tubes, so what was the point of keeping the uterus? It's hard to be compassionate in a situation like this. When your doctors tell you what you need, but you refuse, what is there left to do? Write in to a forum like this for a second opinion?

  5. QUESTION:
    Recurring ovarian cysts?
    Ovarian cysts which keep coming back?
    I keep getting ovarian cysts. I am 14 and have had 6 over the last year and had 3 removed.
    GRR is there something i'm doing to keep getting them

    But because of my age they aren't even thinking about removing the ovary which is where all the cysts are growing (right ovary)

    Urmm also i have been on birth control since 13 (it's not helped!)

    Is this likey to be PCOS? Do i ask the doctor?!

    sizes of cysts:
    1) 6cm
    2) 7.5cm
    3) 12 cm (first to be removed)
    4) 11 cm (also removed)
    5) 5cm
    6) 13cm (Latest one to be removed)

    And the one i have now is : 8cm

    WHATS HAPPENING?!

    Urm also i have 5 cysts on my fallopian tube is this likey to cause pain or not?!

    • ANSWER:
      Could be PCOS. One of the causes of PCOS is a poor diet full of sugar and carbohydrates as well as stress, lack of exercise and toxins. Dr John Lee recommends using 15 to 20 mg of progesterone cream daily from day 14 to day 28 of your cycle. This link really explains it in further detail>>>>

      PCOS:
      http://www.cyst101.com/cause.htm

      Xenoestrogens cause ovarian cysts. This in found in plastic drinking bottles and plastics used with food, commercially raised beef, chicken and pork (in the USA), canned foods, birth control pills, preservative methyl paraben in skin lotions and gels and other cosmetics:

      Xenoestrogens:
      http://www.cyst101.com/xeno.htm

      How to avoid xenoestrogens:
      http://www.ehow.com/how_4515846_avoid-exposure-xenoestrogens.html

      Skin deep - cosmetics data base:
      http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/

  6. QUESTION:
    Could I have Endometriosis without having heavy bleeding?
    I am 24 years old and my husband and I have tried to have a baby for over 14 months now, my ob/gyn told me to keep trying for another 6 months and then he would look into possible causes for not getting pregnant. a few days after my doc visit my mother told me that she had fallopian tube blockage as well as cysts on her right ovary and had to have it removed. I have constipation/diarrhea /irregular periods(25-32day cycles)/painful sex during and something after in certain positions/ im always tired/depression/and painful cramps during my period so bad i just lay in bed all day. My question is is it possible to have endometriosis and not have a heavy period? My period i think is irregular and its light but with my mothers history and my symptoms i cant help to think it could be endo? I plan on seeing my doctor asap to discuss my family history but can anyone lend some insight on this?
    oh i have very painful ovulation also and days leading to it and after it

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is possible to have endometriosis although there is no heavy bleeding. Some women don't know they have endometriosis until they start to try to have a baby and find out that they can't.

  7. QUESTION:
    Could I have Endometriosis without having heavy bleeding?
    I am 24 years old and my husband and I have tried to have a baby for over 14 months now, my ob/gyn told me to keep trying for another 6 months and then he would look into possible causes for not getting pregnant. a few days after my doc visit my mother told me that she had fallopian tube blockage as well as cysts on her right ovary and had to have it removed. I have constipation/diarrhea /irregular periods(25-32day cycles)/painful sex during and something after in certain positions/ im always tired/depression/and painful cramps during my period so bad i just lay in bed all day. My question is is it possible to have endometriosis and not have a heavy period? My period i think is irregular and its light but with my mothers history and my symptoms i cant help to think it could be endo? I plan on seeing my doctor asap to discuss my family history but can anyone lend some insight on this?
    my doctor has yet to know about my family history as I have just learned about it recently.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure about having endometriosis but you should definitely get a second opinion about fertility testing. You should be able to at least be tested after a year of ttc with no success especially with your family history.

  8. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst Removal?
    I have posted this question before. But not getting the answer I want.

    I have had pain for the last 6 months. I was seen at the hospital almost 3 months ago and I had a cyst the size of a golfball. My DR said he wanted to keep an eye on it so a month later I had another ultrasound and it grew to the size a little bigger than a baseball. He wants to remove it now. I have my surgery on the 7th. He thinks he can take it out laproscopic.

    My question is, are my chances pretty good on that? I'm afraid its even bigger and when I'm under the knife he will have to do open surgery.

    I am a single mom of a 9 month old and am so scared that I will have the open surgery and my recovery will be longer and need more help with my son.

    Anyone with similar experience?

    The answer I am looking for is:

    I know the recovery for laproscopic. I don't want to know about that. But I want to know about chances of me having an open surgery? How big is TOO big for laproscopic?

    Please help me. I'm driving myself insane because I won't find out how it went til I wake up :-(

    • ANSWER:
      I had an ovarian cyst the size of a grapefruit a couple of months ago and the doctor wanted to remove it through laproscopic...when she went in, she discovered that because the cyst was so big it had caused my fallopian tube to wrap around itself 6 times...because it was attached to my tube she decided to just drain the cyst (leaving about 5% of the cyst on my ovary) and not remove it since it could cause scarring of my fallopian tubes and cause me to have problems having children later in life and since i was only 19 she didn't want to do that to me.

      the only thing that they had to do differently than expected was to make an additional incision on my abdomen (only about 1/4 in long) and drain the cyst instead of removing it completely. she put me on a low dose of birth control to prevent the cyst from getting any bigger and to prevent any additional cysts from forming again since i had multiple on both ovaries. recovery time was about 6 days and i was able to go back to college and walk around campus without a problem. i can no longer feel any pain and there have been no signs of cysts since.

      hope this helps and good luck :)

  9. QUESTION:
    I have an ovarian cyst? I have (lots of) questions?
    I have to do the u/s but then what?? Do I just live w/this pain off/on? If it's ruptured does it keep coming back?
    I have already had my children (2) and my hubby had a vasectomy done, I have NO desire to have more kids. Is taking out my ovaries an option to stop this? Do they even do that? I had a million questions at the DR but had my children w/me so it was impossible to address all my ques at the time.

    What is the link to cysts and cancer?? What causes some to have to have surgery while others just say it happens to me all the time? I have not taking b/c for about 1.5 years now...is this why it's happening to me now. Any help to any of my questions that you know would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. Clomid or Serophene, which are drugs used to induce ovulation, can raise the risk of getting this type of cyst. * These cysts are almost never associated with cancer. *

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      Laparoscopy if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.

      Laparotomy if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.

      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

  10. QUESTION:
    how serious is a diagnosis of a twisted ovary?
    a mass was found around the ovary, but two months ago they said it was a cyst, now the pain is severe & a sonogram showed a mass & possible twisted ovary (age 36--no children)

    • ANSWER:
      I just had my ovary & tube removed a few months ago for the same thing. It is serious, and VERY painful. I had a cyst on my ovary that kept growing until it pushed up against my appendix and twisted the fallopian tube. When that happens, the blood supply is cut off to that ovary & tube. If not treated, the blood keeps accumulating because it has no place to go. This puts pressure on you organ and causes unbearable pain. The tissue also dies and could further complicate things. The surgery to correct this isn't nearly as bad as the pain you have before surgery.

  11. QUESTION:
    HELP?! Signs of cysts on ovaries?? itching? ?
    Hi i know that i have a cyst on my ovaries. i went to the ER about 2weeks ago. The pain went away after about 3days and now that my period is over the pain is back and is even worse than before. Pain is coming and going and is very sharp when it does come mostly after ive been sitting and i get up or if i bend or lift up my daughter. this just began today. Also i noticed that starting today ive been very itchy on my face and neck and arms and stuff..... Is that a possible sign of ovarian cyst? and should i be worried that the pain is worse? I tried to make an appt. with my obgyn but was unable to get anyone on the phone. I'm just not sure what may be going on, and i just worry about it getting bigger and really scared of it bursting or something. Any helpful advice would be great

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you keep on trying to get a hold of your gynaecologist, or try to see another gynaecologist for further evaluation as sometimes cyst can twist or cut of the blood supply to your ovary causing a medical emergency.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  12. QUESTION:
    Will I go through early menopause if I get one ovary removed?
    I recently found out that I have a huge ovarian cyst on my left side and that I am going to need surgery ASAP! My gynecologist wants to remove the whole ovary because there is a very small chance that it could be malignant. Is there any possibility that it would cause me to go into early menopause if I keep the right ovary?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear Jesus_is.., So sorry for your Medical condition and hope you will feel better soon. that said as to your question Your doctor may conduct an ovary removal, or oophorectomy, as part of a hysterectomy or if you have an abnormal growth. This surgery is often performed by laparoscopy so you can go home the same day or the following day.An oophorectomy is the removal of one or both your ovaries (female reproductive structure responsible for producing eggs and generating hormones). When one ovary is removed, the procedure is called a unilateral oophorectomy, and when both ovaries...Surgical menopause is the removal of a woman's ovaries during surgery. Only the ovaries may be removed, or the woman may have a partial or total hysterectomy. Removing the uterus and fallopian tubes will not cause surgical menopause, only the...If only one ovary is removed, the woman will not go through surgical menopause because there is still another ovary producing hormones.Know Who Needs Surgical Menopause, Women who have ovarian cancer may have their ovaries removed during surgery. Women who suffer from painful fibroid tumors may also opt to have the ovaries surgically removed. Some women who are genetically predisposed to breast and ovarian cancer opt to have their ovaries removed, especially if their sisters or mother have developed breast or ovarian cancer. Mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a high risk for breast or ovarian cancer. If there is a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, get genetic testing to find out if you have the mutation.All surgeries have risks that are serious considerations for you. Excessive blood loss, infection and complications from anesthesia are just some of the risks of all surgery. Other complications for removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy) include unintentional injury to other internal organs during surgery and intestinal blockages.Predicting Hot Flashes, Yes! You will have all the symptoms of natural menopause after surgery to remove the ovaries. You may experience one or all of these symptoms immediately after surgery including hot flashes, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, night sweats, vaginal dryness, diminished sex drive and fatigue, unless you start on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) right away. HRT can be in the form of a pill, gel or a patch prescribed in the lowest possible dosage,Understand Hormone Replacement Therapy ,Estrogen Therapy alone does increase the risk of uterine cancer, so most women are given a combination of estrogen and progestin, called Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or Hormone Therapy. If you've had a total hysterectomy and the uterus has been removed, you no longer have to worry about uterine cancer. Progestin protects the uterus from cancer, which is why it's combined with estrogen to provide protection against cancer in HRT. Most doctors agree that women should remain on HRT for no more than 5 years. Side effects of HRT can include headaches and breast pain. Some women temporarily gain water weight. More serious side effects of HRT include bleeding, cancer, stroke, heart disease, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Go for regular check ups while you're on HRT, and contact your doctor if you experience any unusual side effects. I hope all these information helped you with more knowledge which will take you from Zero to hero. Good luck best wishes hope you get better soon. Sorry for your problems but you will get better dear hope for the best.

  13. QUESTION:
    how likely are you to get more than one ovarian cyst?
    9 years ago I had a very large ovarian cyst which I had removed along with my left ovary and fallopian tube. I have had a pain in my right ovary all morning and at first I thought it was ovulation pain but now I'm worried it might be another cyst. Last time I had no symptoms and we only noticed something was wrong when I had a large distended stomach. I have a big tummy anyway from too many krispy kreme but nothing like that last time. I'm so worried that my last hope for a child might be damaged. I've booked in with the doctor on Monday but I was just wondering if I have an increased likelihood because I've already had one cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, what I am about to type is not going to relax the worry factor for you. When a person's body starts producing cysts of this type it can and likely will continue to produce them. I have had a total hysterectomy with salpingo oophorectomy because of ongoing problems with HUGE ovarian cysts and other bleeding abnormalities.
      1. I know it is hard, but try to have happy thoughts this weekend. Take care of yourself. No heavy lifting or reaching or straining of any kind. If you do have a cyst, you do not wan that to rupture. Then you have nasty fluid in your abdominal cavity and that can cause sepsis and you could die if not treated. (this is what happened to me - not the dieing party though - haha).
      2. do not take hot baths. A cooler shower only. Raising your body temp right not is not a good reaction you want. Not cold water.
      3. Eat extremely healthy this weekend. If you would have to endure surgery, you will have some extra nutrients in your system to help get you through. And we all know how enjoyable the hospital food is......blah!
      Other than that, just use common sense and take care of yourself. Write down any meds you are on. Write down any symptoms you are having - almost like keeping a mini journal. That way when you go to the dr - you have good substantial information to give so that he/she can help you and your situation to the best of their ability.

  14. QUESTION:
    What are ovarian cysts and how do i know if have them?
    I'm panicking, my mom found out i used birth control and she told me that you can get some type of sickness, i dont know what it's called but she said that i can get like my grandfather if i keep using the pills, im not sure what happened but he couldn't talk, and he can't do a lot of force.. anyway i started researching to see if i can find anything that relates to that but now i read something about ovarian cysts.. it said something about it MAY not be cancerous so now im scared!!

    Should i stop taking birth control pills?? Ive been using them for almost 2 years now, what are the consequences of using birth control... i really need your help! and some advice would be great.. thanks in advance
    Sorry.. also should i change my birth control method?? my boyfriend keeps telling me to use Mirena but i'm too scared to use that, wont it get stuck?? i sound dumb but im freaking out yo! lol

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills are not dangerous. If they were, there would be millions and millions of women out there with problems and birth control pills would not be prescribed by doctors anymore, so unfortunately your Mum is wrong.

      Birth control pills are a synthetic form of the hormones progesterone and estrogen. They prevent ovulation by maintaining more consistent hormone levels. Without a peak in estrogen, then, the ovary doesn't get the signal to release an egg. No egg means no possibility for fertilization and pregnancy. They also thicken cervical mucus so the sperm cannot reach the egg, and make the lining of the uterus unreceptive to the implantation of a fertilized egg.

      Some common minor side effects of birth control pills can include some mild nausea when first starting birth control pills, spotting or breakthrough bleeding, breast tenderness, mood changes, decreased sex drive, weight gain, cervical changes and vaginal discharge.

      Birth control pills can be good at helping prevent ovarian cysts from forming on your ovaries as ovarian cysts usually form during ovulation.

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  15. QUESTION:
    what is a ovarian cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      It's a giant pain in the neck. So to speak.

      All kidding aside, an ovarian cyst is a growth caused by an improper release (or lack thereof) of the egg from the follicle.

      Normally, one or more of the follicles attached to the ovary holds onto the egg while gradually accumulating fluid throughout the month. Then, at ovulation, the follicle bursts open and releases the egg to travel through the fallopian tube on its way to either be fertilized or eventually discharged in menses.

      Sometimes though, this process doesn't work properly and the follicle holds onto the egg. The follicle accumulates more and more fluid and becomes an ovarian cyst in the sense we normally think of. Sometimes the cyst bursts later on after it's bigger than it should be, and this can be very painful for the woman. Sometimes the cyst stays at a small size and just sits there for a long time without ever getting much bigger - a lot of women have this type without ever even knowing it. And sometimes, as in my case, they just keep growing and growing and never burst, and eventually have to be surgically removed. That's not too common, however.

      Since this is posted in the cancer forum, I should mention that these types of cysts are almost always non-cancerous. If you have problems with them though, your doctor may decide to run a CA-125 to check for cancer markers. Never hurts just to be safe.

  16. QUESTION:
    If you are diagonosed with an ovarian cyst, does that mean you won't be able to have children later on?

    • ANSWER:
      no. Some simple functional cysts come and go each month and you don't even know it. Some cause pelvic pain much like menstrual cramps. Unless you have polycystic ovaries or other complications with your actual fallopian tubes than it should not hinder your ability to conceive. Some cysts can grow quite large. Your gyn should keep an eye on it and have it removed if it continues to cause problems or looks suspicious during the ultrasound. Usually they will monitor it for several months first before resorting to surgery. Majority of the time they can just remove the cyst and leave the ovary intact.

  17. QUESTION:
    Anyone ever suffer from pain caused by scar tissue?
    I have had several episodes of extreme abdominal pain and everytime the ER doctors have though it was my appendix! Come to find out it isn't and then they say is may be cyst on my ovaries! Well i did have a cyst but it has passed but i am still having severe abdominal pain that happens several hours every other day. I have had my gall bladder removed and had a c-section and tubal 2 years ago! anyone else have this kind of pain please let me know! The last doctor I was seen by said it could be scar tissue!

    • ANSWER:
      I went through something similar to what you're going through. I had endometriosis on my cervix and uterus, and ovarian cysts. The doc ended up removing the first two listed, and I kept my ovaries and fallopian tubes. A good site to go to is www.webmd.com There they have a symptom checker that I've used to many times to count. They also have boards for specific health issues (as well as generalized).
      Have you asked your doc about endometriosis? My understanding is that it's basically scar tissue that has built up on feminine organs for whatever reason, can cause a LOT of abdomenal/lower back pain, and can continue for years before it's discovered.

      The only way one can actually be truly diagnosed with endo is to have a laperoscomy...have you had that done before? It's three very small incisions on your abdomen?

  18. QUESTION:
    i have uterine fibroids that are 8mm big and i have a cyst on my ovary. my question is......?
    when should i start considering a hysterectomy? i am taking hormones (agystin) now to try and shrink them. my doctor said that it is supposed to work. exactly how big is an 8mm fibroid? should i be worried? if 8mm is really small then why do i bleed so bad and why do i hurt so much? if 8mm is huge then why not just do the hysterectomy? what other problems should i expect from a 8mm fibroid and cyst?
    i just turned 30 in january. me and my husband have 4 kids and my tubes have been "tied and burned" (tubaligation) so we are not having any more kids. what are the health risk of having a hysterectomy so young?

    • ANSWER:
      fibroid tumors are highly vascular, so when you cyle thru your period, they bleed quite a bit, a woman can become severely anemic from fibroids, but if you have only one, it's really not that big a deal. As for a cyst on your ovary, I am surprised your doctor did not explain to you that cysts form on ovaries normally to release an egg, the cyst breaks and the ova is propelled toward the fallopian tube. So, that too is a normal process.
      What you might want to discuss with your doctor is a D&C instead of a hysterectomy. And there is also the partial hysterectomy too, where only the uterus is removed and you keep your ovaries for the hormones they produce. I would not consider a total hysterectomy until there simply was no other choice based on heavy bleeding causing anemia, or debilitating pain.

  19. QUESTION:
    Depo Shot side effects and infertility?
    When i was 12 I had a cyst in my right fallopian tube. Because it was so big, my tube had to be removed. To keep my cysts under control i began taking the Depo shot at age 15, with no periods. I was on the shot for 3 years. I was wondering if there were any side effects i should know about and if the shot can cause infertility and if it can, what are the chances of being able to get pregnant? Also, what is the longest people should go taking the shot?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor has obviously put you on the shot for medical reasons. Depo only causes temporary infertility. It changes the cervical mucus and prevents the ovaries from releasing eggs. Women who were fertile before starting depo will usually return to their normal fertility between 1 and 18 months after their last shot.

  20. QUESTION:
    I took plan B over a month ago...ovarian cyst?
    On January 9 and accident happened with the condom. Within two hours I went to the pharmacy and I took the Plan B pill (Morning after pill). Two weeks later on january 21, I got my period on time, except that it was unsually light. It lasted 5 days but there was barely any blood.

    I should have gotten my next period last friday-saturday, around the 19th of febuary and I still havent got it. But I've been having pains on my right abdominal side. Its like an ache and its on and off.
    No pain in the pelvic region except twinges sometimes.

    I took a pregnancy test about a week and half ago (and it would have been acurrate by then because I took it weeks after my 'light period'. And it came up NEGATIVE.

    Now..I've red about ectopic pregnancys but most of information says that ectopic pregnancy will show up positive. Is that true?
    + my pain isnt sharp or unberable so I guess its not an ectopic?

    Then I red about ovarian cysts....and that I supose would make more sense. It says that it can cause irregular cycles (such as my light period and my now 7 day late period). and lower abdominal pain, etc. I also red a few places that plan B CAN soemtimes cause an ovarian cyst?

    What do you guys think? Let me know...I'm worried.

    • ANSWER:
      Generally an ectopic pregnancy should show a positive result, as you would be pregnant regardless of the fact the pregnancy is developing in the fallopian tube.

      I would be more inclined to run with the thought it may possibly be a cyst. If it gets worse, you need to seek help. I suffered with Endometriosis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endometriosis) from the age of 16 until I had a hysterectomy in my early 20's, although that is not the normal outcome for most, so please don't hit the panic button.

      Document your symptoms ... keep track using a daily pain scale out of 10, note when you have your period, rate your daily blood loss and so on, that will help you relay information to a doctor if or when you go ... they take more notice when you have the facts in front of you ... Good Luck

      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed an ovarian cyst. An ovarian cyst can be as small as a pea, or larger than an orange.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).[1] In the US, ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women.[citation needed]

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.

      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove cysts larger than 5 centimeters in diameter.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst

  21. QUESTION:
    A little help I'm losing hope :(?
    I had a tumor on my left ovary a couple of years ago and they had to remove it and my fallopian tube. So I have my right ovary and fallopian tube, last time I went to the doctor she said I had a small cyst on my ovary she wasn't concerned about it because it was tiny and hadn't grown she also said that I had some fluid in my fallopian tube. I asked about getting pregnant and she said she didn't think it would be an issue. This was in April. Now I've been trying to get pregnant I bought some ovulation test and have been taking them since the 16th of this month since I started on the 10th and I'm still getting the same results not ovulating. I can't get in to the doctor for another 6-8weeks. Is there any hope here? It seems like there is so many problems that it isn't going to happen. Has anyone else had problems similar to these and still got pregnant? How long did it take if so? Thanks
    Thank you cds I'm trying to keep positive it's just hard I know you understand that, thank you and good luck to you baby dust :)

    • ANSWER:
      I had a tumor removed from my right ovary 2 years ago, but the ovary remained and I'm not sure if it even works 100%. I cant believe how similar your case is to mine - tracking ovulation and everything! We've been ttc almost a year now, with no luck..yet...but dont give up hope, there's an angel there waiting for you guys too.
      I was actually phrasing an almost exact question when I found your post.
      Dont lose hope, keep trying, with the guidance of your doctor and it doesnt hurt to get a second opinion. Stress can affect your ovulation cycle so while it may be hard to take this off your mind it helps to keep a positive attitude.
      I can't give you the answer to getting pregnant (cause not even I have it yet :) but, what I can advise is not to lose hope - you're not in this alone. Stay comitted to this, remember to have fun - dont make it a chore, and keep checking with your doctor for guidance, and prayer helps to keep your sanity in tact. (oh, dont forget to take care of your health, and your guy's too!)
      Baby Dust & the best of luck for you!

  22. QUESTION:
    Is my cyst something to worry about?
    I have a cyst on my right ovary. Two months ago it was 5.4 cm.. My doctor didn't say which kind of cyst it was.. But he said we would wait and see if it goes away.. So I have an appt in a week. For another ultrasound.. But I've had horrible pains in my lower abdomen. And I always feel tired, dizzy, short of breath, and that's not normal for me.. My breast are sore as well.. And my periods are very irregular.. Does it sound like my cyst is worse than the doc said? I'm also very bloated all the time and it looks like I'm pregnant, but I'm not sexually active.. And I'm skinny so it's not bc I'm fat.

    • ANSWER:
      Most women get cysts and never even know that they have them. I have had really bad ones since before I was 15 years old. When I get them I have never had any kind of dizziness or short of breath, none of your symptoms should be from it except possibly the abdominal pain. I would ask the doctor about that. I don't think it has anything to do with it. The first one I had was one of the worse and had the bad pains in my lower ab from the size and pressure of it. I almost had to go in for surgery, but luckily it reduced in size by my second ultra sound. I have had several ultra sounds done over time and in the ultra sound you can see black circles around the fallopian tubes, but never felt a thing to know they were even there.

      The only thing I've been told to keep them under control is to go on birth control pills. Very rarely do they ever cause any problems with fertility. I've had multiple one on both sides many times. I am 32 and have had two babies with no problems.

      If it's large and is causing discomfort they can surgically remove them if they don't go down in size.
      5.4 cm is not small, but the one I had (that the doctor was watching) was larger then that, about the size of a fist.

      Ask the doctors about the other symptoms as soon as possible. They may just be from you being worried. Make sure you get it checked out again and maybe ask about birth control to help them as well as to regulate your cycle.

  23. QUESTION:
    Abnormal heavy bleeding & Severely large blood clots?
    (The hour that I was in the bathroom before going to the Dr. I had filled up a Regular Kotex Pad, sopping filled up & breaking apart, in 10-15minutes, to give an idea about the bleeding)
    Yesterday morning at about 9am I got my period, few trickles of blood on the toilet paper so I put in a tampon, 10minutes later I had blood flowing down my leg.

    I go into the bathroom & the tampon is completely drentched in blood, I sit on the toilet and I am literally gushing out blood and passing blood clots larger than quarters. This went on for about an hour until I made an emergency appointment with a Dr. I lost about 2pints of blood.

    The doctor told me "I suspect miscarrrying" well I wasn't pregnant, and she did a pregnancy test and it was negative, so then this woman says "I'm not sure what this is, here is a prescription for Ibuprofen, if it gets worse go to the emergency room, I'm also sending you to get blood work done to check for anemia" She never performed an examine, just checked my blood pressure and asked questions.

    The heavy bleeding and passing of large clots probably went on for about 5-6hrs, and then the bleeding turned to a normal period flow for me, which is very light and I was passing small clots. I was due for my period when all this began.

    I'm also on Loestrin 24, this is my second month taking the pills, I'm freaking out, I don't know what the hell went on.

    Before this happened, I was very nauseas and very tired, and I am still this way, My abdomen & lower abdomen look like they are inflammed, and are hard to the touch. I have minor pain on my left side.

    I plan on going to my regular doctor after the bleeding subsides to get a full exam, my regular doctor didnt have any appointments available.

    Does anyone have any ideas of what could have happened? Or has this happened to anyone else?

    The largest blood clot was about the width of a soda can, and the smallest about the size of a quarter.
    I guess I should add my age, I'm 18.

    • ANSWER:
      Your experience sounds exactly like mine...I was 11 at the time, they even gave me pregnancy tests (though I was a virgin) and told me there was nothing wrong, it was just my period.

      Sounds like you may have dysfunctional uterine bleeding, which could be caused by an ovarian cyst or swollen ovary - that's what happened to me. I had horrible pains in my right side and bled quarts of blood an hour for about two days, before they took me to the ER and put me on birth control. Perhaps you need to switch pills. Unfortunately this is a problem that's really hard to diagnose, so just keep visiting the ER or your OB/GYN until they come up with a solution.

      For me, I had to go on the pill, then have my right ovary & fallopian tube removed... The problems have since stopped, but that's a pretty terrible experience. It took about seven months for them to fix it.

      Best of luck, hon, I hope you don't have to go through what I did. Just keep going to the doctor until they give you a straight answer!

  24. QUESTION:
    I have booked my first appointment with a new doctor I have never been to.?
    and i am very nervous and scared cause i need to tell the doctor sll this
    I am so nevous cause it is a new doctor i have never been to before. I dont no how to tell her all this. I no I will get to the appointment and just forget it all or not say it all as I will be so nervous and scared as. This is what i need to tell her well i think so. The first day of my period is always the worst. I get server cramps, stabbing like sensation, feel like vomiting, like headed, faint/ dizzy, cant walk. Just wondering what it might be. It last for 2 days and i cant go to work. from then on till my period goes away which is about 7 days total i just have the server cramps and headaches gallore. I have tried advil, period pain panadole, heat packs, ice packs, warm bath, herbal tea. This has last for now 2 years am I am 19 almost 20 I have had my period since I was 9 so about 10 years. how can i tell her and is it all important for her to no if not what isnt important. hekp
    What are the types of questions a new doctor will ask.
    also what did a new doctor want to do. like will they just want to take my blood pressure or what.

    • ANSWER:
      From the sounds of what you are describing, it is very likely that you have endometriosis. This can be a very painful condition. Endometriosis is a condition where the lining that is developed inside your uterus also starts to grow outside the uterus. Growths can be found on the ovaries, the outside of the uterus, fallopian tubes, liver, kidneys, abdominal wall, and several other areas of the abdomen. Theses growths do not shed monthly like the lining that is grown inside the uterus every month, which is shed from the body during your menstrual cycle. There is no way to see if this is a problem without doing exploratory surgery. These growths can not be seen on ultrasound, CT scans, or MRI's. When you get these endometrial growths on the outside of the uterus it is almost like coating your uterus with concrete. Since the uterus is a muscle, the more endometrial lining that is on the outside, the worse your pain will be. This can also lead to infertility in the future if it is not addressed now.

      The surgery is simple. The doctor makes three small incisions in your pelvic region and uses a laser to burn off any of the growths that are found in your abdomen. The doctor will also usually do a D&C which is Dilation and Curettage. This is where the doctor will scrape out all the lining that is currently inside the uterus. A few days after the procedure you will either start Danazol, which is a daily oral steroid or Depo Lupron injections which are done either monthly or every 3 months. Both drugs basically cause a medically induced menopause causing natural hormone production to stop, and therefor stop ovulation and your menstrual cycle. This is usually done for 6 months. After that, the doctor will start you on continuous birth control, which is where you only take the active pills and skip the placebo week and move on to the next pack. Basically, if the doctors can stop your periods, or make it so you only have them once every 6 months, this will keep the endometriosis from growing back so quickly. The BC does not stop the growth but it does slow it down dramatically.

      Make sure you see an OB/GYN or fertility specialist to get this problem addressed. You need to tell the doctor everything that you said here. Let them know how long it has been happening, what the level of your pain is during your menstrual cycle (scale of 1-10), and the most severe symptoms you experience. This should set off alarm bells in a good doctor's mind that you have developed severe endometriosis. I was first diagnosed when I was 19. The doctor I saw did not take me seriously, but agreed to do exploratory surgery to see if this was the problem. It took him nearly two hours to laser off all the areas where it had grown, and he also had to remove 2 large ovarian cysts while he was in there. He came out of surgery and told my mom that he would have given me a hysterectomy if I had not been 19. It was that bad.

      The healing time afterward was about a week. The medication that was used to put me into menopause was not fun because you do get hot flashes and night sweats, which really sucks. I remember waking up in the middle of the night a week after I had my first shot and the sheets and my pajamas were drenched with sweat. I had to go outside, where the temperature was about 30 degrees, and stand in the cool air for about 20 minutes just to cool off.

      Please be sure to tell this doctor everything. If you are concerned about leaving out the details, write them down on a piece of paper, along with any questions you may have, and take it in to your appointment. This will insure that you tell the doctor everything he needs to know and that you will get some answers to your questions. If it would help, you can also have a friend or family member go in with you because you may get a ton of information and they can take notes for you while the doctor is talking. This way you will not have to worry about forgetting any information that is relayed in the appointment. I hope you can find some relief soon. I know how it feels to have such painful periods and be so young. It interrupts your entire life for a week every month and that sucks when you are young and trying to have fun.

  25. QUESTION:
    i think i have cervical cancer but no one is taking me seriously?
    ok it all started last june when i had an ectopic, i found out i was pregnant and began getting dull pains in one side of my stomach, where my ovary is. i went to hospital and after tests they said ectopic and i had an operation to remove the left fallopian tube, even though my pain was on the right side. they also said i was only 6 weeks pregnant so not far on enough for ectopic to cause pain. the pain, coming and going from dull to sharp carried on for 2 months,(worse with my period) then i found out i was pregnant again, same pain, went to hospital and they did tests and said miscarriage. i had one normal period after that then was pregnant again with my history i went to the hospital and they did a scan, baby was ok but i had an ovairain cyst about 3cms on the right hand side. 2 days later i misscarried agian. not wanting to go through it again i had the implanon fitted a week later on 27th november. i started my period boxing day and finished 26th jan. ive had bleeding, brown and clotted and then when i get the sharp pain ( brought on by coughing or sneezing) i get dark red blood, ive had a normal period in feb ten the spotting again. my right breast is VERY tender and i have smelly discharge down below, i have a wee about 20 times a day, i havnt been able to have sex with my husband since jan because it hurts too much. if i strain at the toilet i feel as both ovaries are going to POP out. i cant sit still or stand in the same place for more than five minutes without getting pain. i saw went to the hospital and the doc examined me and said i can have a scan in 4 weeks and that bleeding is normal and she gave me tramadol for the pain and the oral pill for bleeding. i feel like no one is taking me seriously. im also nearly 24 if that makes a difference, please help me
    sorry i forgot to say iv felt faint the last 3 weeks and fainted twice last wednesday while i was sat down watching telly.

    • ANSWER:
      You mention the doctor a lot but what kind of dr are you seeing? Is it a GYN or OB-GYN? It makes a difference. Another thing I would have done right away is get another opinion. You keep returning to the same Dr and all he's doing is trying out different things without really taking a serious look at things. I agree with you. I don't think they're taking you serious. Oh, no, I really DO NOT beleive that you have cervical cancer. This sounds like either a very bad yeast infection, which would account for the foul odor, or some other kind of infection. Have they done any blood work on you? The constant miscarriages and the ectopic pregnancy is something that happens once in a while on a woman, unless you are the kind that cannot carry a baby full term. This happened to a very dear friend of mind. She could not carry a baby full term because her cervix would always dilate at around 4 months into her pregnancy and she lost her baby. Then they came up with something that worked. Remember, we are talking over 40 yrs ago. When she got pregnant again, the Dr put one stitch in her cervix to prevent it from opening. She had to remain on bed rest, but it worked. She had a beautiful baby girl and later on, a son. Now, I couldn't tell you if that's what going on with you, but I seriously believe you should seek out help somewhere else. Go to a hospital that specializes in this. Another thing, my mother had an ectopic pregnancy, which by the way was in the 1940's and all they did was remove the baby not the fallopian tube. She went on to have more babies, 12 in all. That's why I'm wondering. If they didn't remove my mother's fallopian tube in the 40's, what was the reason for removing yours. That tube is so tiny, that when an ova stops moving along the tube and the sperm joins up with it in the tube, that's when trouble begins, as you know. Some women have even died as a results of ectopic preganancies. 6 weeks pregnant in the tube, wow, you must have a high tolerance for pain. Honey, please, see someone else if just for another opinion. I may be way off base, but this sounds like a bad infection and this would also cause you to have pain during sex because if you have an infection, and it's going untreated, then yes, all those sypmtoms would occur. How I pray I'm wrong, but at least call someone else. Get some answers, demand answers. I will pray for you. God bless you Honey.

  26. QUESTION:
    I HAVE A 2.7 CM MATURE TERATOMA OR DERMOID & I AM FREAKING OUT NEED ANSWERS PLEASE?
    Last Sunday I went to the ER cause I had some pain in my side and in my back I really thought I had a kidney stone just cause I have history of having them. After a CT scan this is what the report said word for word: 1. No evidence of nephroureterolithiasis or obstructive uropathy or cystitis 2. No free fluid in the pelvis 3. Fat-containing lesion in the left adnexa measuring 2.7 cm could represent a dermoid or mature teratoma. I also did have a bladder infection and was put on a antibiotic but as with what they did see I have several questions 1. does left adnexa mean in my uterus or abdomen cause honestly I have had cysts on my ovaries and where I am currently having pain is much higher up and feels like it is no where near my ovary but the ER doctor said to make an appointment with my Gyno (which I did and my apt is today( Thursday Sept 4th) But I want to know and understand more about where this tumor is actually located. I have read it only occurs in certain places mainly on the ovary in the case of woman again I really don't think it is near the ovary however it feels like it is in my uterus is that possible that is is no where near my ovary, I also know I want it removed I feel like there is an alien in me or I have been invaded it just hurts too. I will insist on having it removed I am just super curious if it is something I was born with or caused from me having children and it was one of my children's twin I keep hearing twin was I one or was one of my children one or is the twin thing just a myth all together . I also have a mirena is having an IUD the reason I now have this growth, after much research I am confused was there something I could have done to avoid getting this I keep seeing No it just happens. I am really freaking out cause I do have a higher risk of cancer cause my dad is in remission from large cell Lymphoma so when I heard Tumor I instantly thought cancer. Another question how quickly will my doctor schedule surgery I would love to be sent from her office directly to surgery I even decided not to eat after midnight just in case so I could get surgery if they will do it cause not only do I just want this thing out before it gets bigger but cause it is causing me moderate pain in my left side. Please just give me info so that when I go to the gyno I am armed with information and can understand what is about to happen! I really hope cause it is causing me so much pain they will do emergency surgery is that a possibility?

    • ANSWER:
      The adnexa means the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and associated structures related to the uterus structurally or functionally (including ligaments etc.). Teratomas are thought to have been present since birth, dermoids are just cystic teratomas. Both are usually benign. Unless it is an immediate threat to your life, I seriously doubt they'll consider it an emergency. If you are in pain, they're likely to prescribe you drugs to relieve that until the surgery date. How far out they will schedule you, if they decide surgery is needed, will depend on the surgeon's schedule.

  27. QUESTION:
    What exactly is Endometriosis?
    Please tell me everything you know about it...what are the most common symptoms? If you show symptoms how do you go about getting it checked out? If you the cysts on your ovaries and get surgery how long is the recovery? What is the chance of infertility? Everything please!

    • ANSWER:
      Endometriosis occurs when endometrial tissue, the tissue that lines the uterus and is shed during menstruation, grows outside of the uterus on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, ligaments supporting the uterus, and other areas in the pelvic cavity. Endometriosis can also appear in a woman's bladder, bowel, vagina, or other places in her body.

      Like the lining of the uterus, these areas of endometrial tissue respond to the hormones of the menstrual cycle they build up tissue each month, then break down and bleed during menstruation. But unlike the uterus lining, when these endometrial implants (also called growths or lesions) outside the uterus bleed, they can irritate a woman's body.

      71 to 87% of women studied with chronic pelvic pain were found to have endometriosis. Scar tissue buildup is thought to be a cause of chronic pelvic pain.

      A woman may experience other symptoms including painful menstruation and pain during sexual intercourse.

      Among infertile women, about 30 to 45% have endometriosis.

      Not all women with endometriosis will have the same experience. In order to have a beneficial discussion with your doctor, it is important for you to become familiar with some of the most common signs and symptoms of the disease. They are:

      Chronic pelvic pain
      Dysmenorrhea, pain before and during menstruation
      Dyspareunia, pain during and after sexual intercourse
      Irregular vaginal bleeding
      Infertility
      Painful bowel movements during menstruation
      It is also important to know that the amount of pain you may be experiencing is not related to the number or size of your endometrial growths. Some women with visible disease at laparoscopy have no pain, while others without visible disease experience severe pain. This may be one reason why an accurate diagnosis of the disease can be very challenging.

      One way you can partner with your doctor in his or her diagnosis is through a detailed talk about your symptoms, and the effect they are having on you. Use our Doctor Discussion Guide as a way to start the first crucial conversation.

      You can also prepare to talk with your doctor by keeping track of your monthly pain in our interactive Pain Diary and sharing the printouts at your next visit. Working together with your doctor can help you get answers to the questions you have about your symptoms.

      If you are diagnosed with endometriosis, your doctor will consider your age, symptoms, and desire for pregnancy before prescribing a course of therapy individualized to your needs.

      Your doctor may recommend treating your endometriosis with surgical therapy (surgically removing or destroying endometrial growths), or medical therapy (reducing growth size and providing symptom relief). In many cases, your doctor may suggest a combination of surgical and medical therapy.

      Read on to find out more about your treatment options.

  28. QUESTION:
    Complicated pregnancy/PCOS question?
    Okay, this is REALLY complicated. For starters, I have PCOS. Two years ago, I had part of my fallopian tube removed on my right side due to a large cyst. I have another large cyst on my left ovary now, but they aren't going to surgically remove it because it isn't causing me any problems.

    I took Yasmin birth control for years. I got off of it for a while and I had about 3 periods the whole time I was off of it. The only thing that makes me actually have a regular period, is birth control. I've never been more than a day or two late when I take birth control pills.

    Well, I've been taking my pills everyday....I'm on my last sugar pill and I still haven't started my period. This has never happened before. I have had my period since I've been diagnosed with this cyst, so it leads me to believe that it isn't due to that. I took a pregnancy test about two days after it was late and it was negative. Not to mention it was one of those tests.

    I feel like its almost impossible for me to be pregnant because of the PCOS, surgery, my pills, and the cyst on the one side that actually works. The doctors told me I would be able to get pregnant on my own, it would just be harder. I just don't see how it could happen when I haven't missed any pills (I didn't take them at the same time everyday, but I did make sure to take them everyday.) and I have all those other problems. I guess it IS possible, just not likely.

    Should I wait a few more days and take another test? Or is it too unlikely that I could be pregnant? At this point, I don't think I'm going to have one at all. I'm not spotting or anything. I'm pretty concerned and some answers would be greatly appreciated! Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      It's pretty unlikely you are pregnant if you have been taking birth control. I also have PCOS and there have been times my period wouldn't come when I was on the pill. The only thing that has really kept my periods normal is Metphormin. It actually helped me get pregnant too. Good luck!

  29. QUESTION:
    What is Endometriosis? Please Help!?
    My mum has just gone for a scan at the doctors and they have found that she has Endometriosis. I just want to know what exactly it is because even she does not know that much about it. I would also like to know if it can be potentially harmful or anything like that. Please help. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Endometriosis ( en-doh-mee-tree-OH-sus ) is a problem many women have during their childbearing years. It means that a type of tissue that lines your uterus is also growing outside your uterus. This does not always cause symptoms, and it usually is not dangerous. But it can cause pain
      The clumps of tissue that grow outside your uterus are called implants. They usually grow on the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the outer wall of the uterus, the intestines, or other organs in the belly. In rare cases, they spread to areas beyond the belly.

      How does endometriosis cause problems?

      Your uterus is lined with a type of tissue called endometrium (say en-doh-MEE-tree-um ). It is like a soft nest where a fertilized egg can grow. Each month, your body releases hormones that cause the endometrium to thicken and get ready for an egg. If you get pregnant, the fertilized egg attaches to the endometrium and starts to grow. If you do not get pregnant, the endometrium breaks down, and your body sheds it as blood. This is your menstrual period.

      When you have endometriosis, the implants of tissue outside your uterus act just like the tissue lining your uterus. During your menstrual cycle, they get thicker, then break down and bleed. But the implants are outside your uterus, so the blood cannot flow out of your body. The implants can get irritated and painful. Sometimes they form scar tissue or fluid-filled sacs (cysts). Scar tissue may make it hard to get pregnant.

      What causes endometriosis?

      Experts do not know what causes endometrial tissue to grow outside your uterus. But they do know that the female hormone estrogen makes the problem worse. Women have high levels of estrogen during their childbearing years. It is during these years usually from their teens into their 40s that women have endometriosis. Estrogen levels drop when menstrual periods stop (menopause). Symptoms usually go away then.

      How is it treated?

      There is no cure for endometriosis, but there are good treatments. You may need to try several treatments to find what works best for you. With any treatment, there is a chance that your symptoms could come back.

      Treatment choices depend on whether you want to control pain or you want to get pregnant. For pain and bleeding, you can try medicines or surgery. If you want to get pregnant, you may need surgery to remove the implants.

      Treatments for endometriosis include:

      * Over-the-counter pain medicines like ibuprofen (such as Advil or Motrin) or naproxen (such as Aleve). These medicines are called anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. They can reduce bleeding and pain.
      * Birth control pills. They are the best treatment to control pain and shrink implants. Most women can use them safely for years. But you cannot use them if you want to get pregnant.
      * Hormone therapy. This stops your periods and shrinks implants. But it can cause side effects, and pain may come back after treatment ends. Like birth control pills, hormone therapy will keep you from getting pregnant.
      * Laparoscopy to remove implants and scar tissue. This may reduce pain.

  30. QUESTION:
    Has anybody been diagnosed with endometriosis?
    If so, what stage are you and how do you cope with the pain?? I'm 29 yrs old and was diagnosed 11 years ago. I have been trying for years to have another baby, but with no luck:(

    • ANSWER:
      My sister had endometriosis.

      Treatment choices depend on whether you want to control pain or you want to get pregnant. For pain and bleeding, you can try medicines or surgery. If you want to get pregnant, you may need surgery.

      Endometriosis (say en-doh-mee-tree-OH-sus ) is a problem many women have during their childbearing years. It means that a type of tissue that lines your uterus is also growing outside your uterus. This does not always cause symptoms, and it usually is not dangerous. But it can cause pain
      The clumps of tissue that grow outside your uterus are called implants. They usually grow on the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the outer wall of the uterus, the intestines, or other organs in the belly. In rare cases, they spread to areas beyond the belly.
      How does endometriosis cause problems?

      Your uterus is lined with a type of tissue called endometrium (say en-doh-MEE-tree-um ). It is like a soft nest where a fertilized egg can grow. Each month, your body releases hormones that cause the endometrium to thicken and get ready for an egg. If you get pregnant, the fertilized egg attaches to the endometrium and starts to grow. If you do not get pregnant, the endometrium breaks down, and your body sheds it as blood. This is your menstrual period.

      When you have endometriosis, the implants of tissue outside your uterus act just like the tissue lining your uterus. During your menstrual cycle, they get thicker, then break down and bleed. But the implants are outside your uterus, so the blood cannot flow out of your body. The implants can get irritated and painful. Sometimes they form scar tissue or fluid-filled sacs (cysts). Scar tissue may make it hard to get pregnant.

      What causes endometriosis?

      Experts do not know what causes endometrial tissue to grow outside your uterus. But they do know that the female hormone estrogen makes the problem worse. Women have high levels of estrogen during their childbearing years. It is during these years usually from their teens into their 40s that women have endometriosis. Estrogen levels drop when menstrual periods stop (menopause). Symptoms usually go away then.

      How is it treated?

      There is no cure for endometriosis, but there are good treatments. You may need to try several treatments to find what works best for you. With any treatment, there is a chance that your symptoms could come back.

      Treatment choices depend on whether you want to control pain or you want to get pregnant. For pain and bleeding, you can try medicines or surgery. If you want to get pregnant, you may need surgery to remove the implants.

      Treatments for endometriosis include:

      * Over-the-counter pain medicines like ibuprofen (such as Advil or Motrin) or naproxen (such as Aleve). These medicines are called anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. They can reduce bleeding and pain.
      * Birth control pills. They are the best treatment to control pain and shrink implants. Most women can use them safely for years. But you cannot use them if you want to get pregnant.
      * Hormone therapy. This stops your periods and shrinks implants. But it can cause side effects, and pain may come back after treatment ends. Like birth control pills, hormone therapy will keep you from getting pregnant.
      * Laparoscopy to remove implants and scar tissue. This may reduce pain, and it may also help you get pregnant.

  31. QUESTION:
    is this due to depo-provera,that after 5 years i am still not pregnant,and have pcos?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes and no. I was on Depo for a little over a year. My friends and I thought it was the wonder drug. All of us have now been diagnosed with endometriosis and there is no history of it in any of our families. I did not know I had endometriosis until my dr. found a cyst and when it was removed, he found A LOT of endometriosis. Some women have symptoms/others don't. I didn't. While I was in the hospital, a nurse explained to me her daughter was going through the same thing due to the depo. No dr. is going to announce publicly that depo causes any problems. In fact, I don't think a dr. will say any birth control method causes any fertility problems. Keep this in mind though. When you use birth control, you are changing your body's normal hormone levels. When you decide to stop taking birth control, your body's hormones may return to normal other's may not. I ended up not producing enough progesterone and too much estrogen. The PCOS may also be causing the infertility--separate from the depo concern. When you have PCOS, your body does not release a "mature" egg and you are left with many "sacs" where eggs were trying to develop. If the egg is not mature enough, it will not fertilize. I am not a dr. but I have been through it all. I am now 36 weeks pregnant with twins after trying 3 IUIs and 2 IVFs. You need to see an infertility specialist--not your regular Gyn. They will do tests: checking your ovary (egg) reserve, testing your hormone levels, testing to see if your fallopian tubes are open, testing to see if you have any scar tissue/fibroids on your uterus--if this is the case, it is very hard for an egg to implant. I hope this helps but don't see a "regular Gynecologist" Please see an infertility specialist. They will take your history and current "status" into consideration before performing tests. Good Luck!


what causes a cysts on the can fallopian tubes be removed and ovaries kept