Fluid Cyst On Ovary Image

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for Poly Cyst in Overies?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cyst Definition
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops near the surface of the ovary. The ovaries are two small organs on each side of a woman's uterus that produce eggs and female hormones. Mostly an ovarian cyst is small and benign (not cancerous). However, the larger ovarian cyst can cause pain and other problems. A woman can develop one or many ovarian cysts.

      Ovarian Cyst Causes
      Structures called follicles normally grow in the ovaries each month. They produce hormones and release an egg during ovulation. In some cases, follicles may become cysts. There are two main types:

      Functional cyst occurs when a normal monthly follicle does not mature properly and the egg is not released. These cysts often go away on their own within one to three menstrual cycles.
      Follicular cyst can occur after an egg is released. These cysts usually go away on their own in a few weeks.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional cysts and only occur during childbearing years. Many other, less common types of benign cysts can also develop from ovarian tissue. For example, women with endometriosis may develop endometriomas. Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue from the uterine lining grows outside the uterus. Endometriomas are cysts that grow from the uterine tissue on an ovary.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is also associated with cysts. Women with this condition have several small cysts in their ovaries.

      A very small percentage of women have cysts that are caused by cancer.

      Ovarian Cyst Risk Factors
      A risk factor is something that increases your chances of getting a disease or condition. The main risk factor for ovarian cyst is being a woman of childbearing age.

      Ovarian Cyst Symptoms
      Most ovarian cysts do not cause symptoms. When they do, pelvic pain and irregular menstrual bleeding are the two most common symptoms. Pain is usually caused by:

      Direct pressure from the cysts on the ovaries and surrounding structures. This causes chronic pelvic fullness or a dull ache.
      Bleeding from a cyst into and around the ovary. This causes more intense, sharp pain.

      Pain may come and go on a regular basis. Or, it may become more noticeable just before or after a period or during intercourse.

      Other symptoms may include:

      Urinary discomfort associated with bladder pressure or irritation
      Nausea
      Diarrhea

      In rare cases, an ovarian cyst may become twisted and cut off its own blood supply. This can cause severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and fever. This requires immediate medical attention.

      Ovarian Cyst Diagnosis
      The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history, and perform a pelvic exam. This includes feeling the ovaries. ovarian cysts are often found during routine pelvic exams when there are no symptoms.

      If a cyst is suspected or found on physical exam, the doctor may recommend a pelvic ultrasound. This is a test that uses sound waves to create images of the ovaries, from which the doctor can determine the type and size of the cyst, and if treatment is needed.

      Other tests or procedures may be used if a cyst:

      Does not go away after several menstrual cycles
      Gets larger and more painful
      Does not appear to be a simple functional cyst

      Other tests may include:

      Laparoscopy A thin, lighted tube and other small instruments are inserted through several tiny incisions in the abdomen to look at the ovaries directly, drain fluid from a cyst, or take a sample for biopsy.
      Blood test for the protein CA-125 This test is done when a cyst is suspected of being cancerous. CA-125 is sometimes elevated in the case of ovarian cancer.

      Ovarian Cyst Treatment
      Treatment depends on your age, menstrual status, the size and type of the cyst, and your symptoms. The main types of treatment are:

      Wait and See This approach involves waiting a few months to see if the cyst goes away on its own.

      Birth Control Pills If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help make it smaller. If you get ovarian cyst often, birth control pills decrease the chance of new ones forming.

      Laparoscopic Surgery Pelvic laparoscopy may be recommended to remove a cyst if it:

      Grows larger or reaches a size greater than two inches
      Has some solid material in it
      Causes persistent or worsening symptoms
      Lasts longer than two or three menstrual cycles

      If the cyst is not cancerous, often just the cyst can be removed. However, in some cases, your whole ovary may need to be removed. If the cyst is cancerous, you may have your ovary and uterus removed. This requires an open surgical procedure, rather than a laparoscopy.

      Ovarian Cyst Prevention
      Since ovarian cysts are common, and are usually painless and benign, doctors do not routinely recommend any preventive interventions. Women who have recurrent symptomatic cysts may benefit from birth control pills over the long term. The best way to catch cysts early is to:

      Tell your doctor about any changes in your monthly cycles or periods
      Have regular pelvic exams

  2. QUESTION:
    info on ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      **What are ovarian cysts?
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac. They can form anywhere in the body. Ovarian cysts (sists) form in or on the ovaries. The most common type of ovarian cyst is a functional cyst.

      Functional cysts often form during the menstrual cycle. The two types are:
      --Follicle cysts. These cysts form when the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. Then the sac keeps growing. This type of cyst most often goes away in 1 to 3 months.
      --Corpus luteum cysts. These cysts form if the sac doesn't dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Then fluid builds up inside. Most of these cysts go away after a few weeks. They can grow to almost 4 inches. They may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. They are rarely cancerous. Some drugs used to cause ovulation, such as Clomid or Serophene , can raise the risk of getting these cysts.

      Other types of ovarian cysts are:
      --Endometriomas (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-muhs). These cysts form in women who have endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss). This problem occurs when tissue that looks and acts like the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterus. The tissue may attach to the ovary and form a growth. These cysts can be painful during sex and during your period.
      --Cystadenomas (siss-tahd-uh-NOH-muhs). These cysts form from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      --Dermoid (DUR-moid) cysts. These cysts contain many types of cells. They may be filled with hair, teeth, and other tissues that become part of the cyst. They can become large and cause pain.
      Polycystic (pol-ee-SISS-tik) ovaries. These cysts are caused when eggs mature within the sacs but are not released. The cycle then repeats. The sacs continue to grow and many cysts form. For more information about polycystic ovaries, refer to our FAQ about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

      **What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many ovarian cysts don't cause symptoms. Others can cause:

      pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdomen
      pelvic pain
      dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      problems passing urine completely
      pain during sex
      weight gain
      pain during your period
      abnormal bleeding
      nausea or vomiting
      breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      pain with fever and vomiting
      sudden, severe abdominal pain
      faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      rapid breathing

      **How are ovarian cysts found?
      Doctors most often find ovarian cysts during routine pelvic exams. The doctor may feel the swelling of a cyst on the ovary. Once a cyst is found, tests are done to help plan treatment. Tests include:

      --An ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see the cyst's:
      shape
      size
      location
      mass if it is fluid-filled, solid, or mixed
      --A pregnancy test. This test may be given to rule out pregnancy.
      --Hormone level tests. Hormone levels may be checked to see if there are hormone-related problems.
      --A blood test. This test is done to find out if the cyst may be cancerous. The test measures a substance in the blood called cancer-antigen 125 (CA-125). The amount of CA-125 is higher with ovarian cancer. But some ovarian cancers don't make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. Some noncancerous diseases also raise CA-125 levels. Those diseases include uterine fibroids (YOO-tur-ihn FEYE-broidz) and endometriosis. Noncancerous causes of higher CA-125 are more common in women younger than 35. Ovarian cancer is very rare in this age group. The CA-125 test is most often given to women who:
      are older than 35
      are at high risk for ovarian cancer
      have a cyst that is partly solid

      **How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. If you have a cyst, you may be told to wait and have a second exam in 1 to 3 months. Your doctor will check to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who:

      are in their childbearing years
      have no symptoms
      have a fluid-filled cyst
      It may be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. Your doctor may want to remove the cyst if you are postmenopausal, or if it:

      doesn't go away after several menstrual cycles
      gets larger
      looks odd on the ultrasound
      causes pain
      The two main surgeries are:

      --Laparoscopy (lap-uh-ROSS-kuh-pee) done if the cyst is small and looks benign (noncancerous) on the ultrasound. While you are under general anesthesia, a very small cut is made above or below your navel. A small instrument that acts like a telescope is put into your abdomen. Then your doctor can remove the cyst.
      --Laparotomy (lap-uh-ROT-uh-mee) done if the cyst is large and may be cancerous. While you are under general anesthesia, larger incisions are made in the stomach to remove the cyst. The cyst is then tested for cancer. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to take out the ovary and other tissues, like

  3. QUESTION:
    what can an ovary cyst do to you?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in a woman's ovaries. Most cysts are harmless, but some may cause problems such as rupture, bleeding, or pain. Moreover, surgery may be required in certain situations to remove the cyst(s). It is important to understand the function of the ovaries and how these cysts may form.

      Women normally have two ovaries that store and release eggs. Each ovary is about the size of a walnut, and one ovary is located on each side of the uterus. One ovary produces one egg each month, and this process starts a woman's monthly menstrual cycle. The egg is enclosed in a sac called a follicle. An egg grows inside the ovary until estrogen (a hormone), signals the uterus to prepare itself for the egg. In turn, the lining of the uterus begins to thicken and prepare for implantation of a fertilized egg resulting in pregnancy. This cycle occurs each month and usually ends when the egg is not fertilized. All contents of the uterus are then expelled if the egg is not fertilized. This is called a menstrual period.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst. If a follicle fails to rupture and release the egg, the fluid remains and can form a cyst in the ovary. This usually affects one of the ovaries. Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed.

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. The vast majority of ovarian cysts are considered functional (physiologic). This means they occur normally and are not part of a disease process. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment. While cysts may be found in ovarian cancer, ovarian cysts typically represent a harmless (benign) condition or a normal process. Ovarian cysts occur most often during a woman's childbearing years.

  4. QUESTION:
    Swollen left ovary - why?
    I just found out my left ovary is swollen (right one seems normal). I don't know how long it's been like this for. Should I be worried? What could it be? I am hoping it is nothing. I am too scared to find out what it could be .. if it could be bad news?

    thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      it's normal. you can get cysts on them and they generally go away sometime during the month. i used to get them all the time and went through exactly what you are describing. you can go get an ultrasound at the gynecologist if you are worried.

      What are ovarian cysts?
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. Clomid or Serophene, which are drugs used to induce ovulation, can raise the risk of getting this type of cyst. These cysts are almost never associated with cancer.

      There are also other types of cysts:

      Endometriomas. These cysts develop in women who have endometriosis, when tissue from the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus. The tissue may attach to the ovary and form a growth. These cysts can be painful during sexual intercourse and during menstruation.
      Cystadenomas. These cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      Dermoid cysts. The cells in the ovary are able to make hair, teeth, and other growing tissues that become part of a forming ovarian cyst. These cysts can become large and cause pain.
      Polycystic ovaries. The eggs mature within the follicles, or sacs, but the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. The cycle repeats, follicles continue to grow inside the ovary, and cysts form. For more information about polycystic ovaries, refer to our FAQ on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many women have ovarian cysts without having any symptoms. Sometimes, though, a cyst will cause these problems:

      pressure, fullness, or pain in the abdomen
      dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      problems passing urine completely
      pain during sexual intercourse
      weight gain
      painful menstrual periods and abnormal bleeding
      nausea or vomiting
      breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      pain with fever and vomiting
      sudden, severe abdominal pain
      faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      rapid breathing

      How are ovarian cysts found?
      Since ovarian cysts may not cause symptoms, they are usually found during a routine pelvic exam. During this exam, your doctor is able to feel the swelling of the cyst on your ovary. Once a cyst is found, the doctor may perform an ultrasound, which uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see how the cyst is shaped; its size and location; and whether it s fluid-filled, solid, or mixed. A pregnancy test is also done. Hormone levels (such as LH, FSH, estradiol, and testosterone) may also be checked. Your doctor may want to do other tests as well.

      To find out if the cyst might be cancerous, your doctor may do a blood test to measure a substance in the blood called CA-125. The amount of this protein is higher if a woman has ovarian cancer. However, some ovarian cancers do not make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. There are also non-cancerous diseases that increase the levels of CA-125, like uterine fibroids and endometriosis. These non-cancerous causes of increased CA-125 are more common in women under 35, while ovarian cancer is very uncommon in this age group. For this reason, the CA-125 test is recommended mostly for women over age 35, who are at high risk for the disease and have a cyst that is partially solid.

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      Laparoscopy if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.
      Laparotomy if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.
      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      Ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. Fortunately, the vast majority of cysts don t cause any symptoms, are not related to cancer, and go away on their own. Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice any changes in your period, pain in the pelvic area, or any of the major symptoms listed above. A pelvic exam, possibly with an ultrasound, can help determine if a cyst is causing the problem. If a woman is not seeking pregnancy and develops functional cysts, frequently, future cysts may be prevented by taking oral contraceptives, Depo-Provera, or Norplant.

      When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?
      Functional ovarian cysts usually occur during the childbearing years. Most often, cysts in women of this age group are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50-70) with ovarian cysts have a higher risk of ovarian cancer. At any age, if you think you have a cyst, it s important to tell your doctor.

      For More Information...
      You can find out more about ovarian cysts by contacting the National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC) at 800-994-9662 or the following organizations:

      Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ), HHS
      Phone: (800) 358-9295
      Internet Address: http://www.ahrq.gov

      National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), NIH, HHS
      Phone: (800) 370-2943
      Internet Address: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/womenshealth

      American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)
      Internet Address: http://familydoctor.org

      American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM)
      Phone: (205) 978-5000
      Internet Address: http://www.asrm.org

      InterNational Council on Infertility Information Dissemination, Inc. (INCIID)
      Phone: (703) 379-9178
      Internet Address: http://www.inciid.org

  5. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What are some of the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I have an ovarian cyst. Usually it only bothers me during and before my cycle, and when I move or twist certain ways.

      One burst a couple of months ago, and I experienced severe pain, but once it burst, it felt better (I went to the ER).

      Symptoms can be a pinching or cramping feeling, passing dry blood or "water" when it is not your time of the month.

      Sometimes they will do surgery for them. I don't want surgery because I'm on Coumadin, so I'm holding out as long as I can!

      Some are dangerous, and need medical attention...

      Here's some stuff you might find helpful:

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40 s, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are functioning ovarian cysts, which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20 s and 30 s, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common functioning ovarian cysts. Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it s just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

  6. QUESTION:
    differance between ovarian cyst and ovarian tumour?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst, by definition is a fluid filled, thin walled occurrence. A tumor, in this context has solid characteristics. Assuming you mean to differentiate characteristics of benign and cancerous entities on some sort of imaging study, this is a basic guideline.

      As for cancer potential, cysts are often observed in the absence of symptoms, rapid change, or large size, while solid lesions may warrant a more aggressive approach even when asymptomatic.

      In the ovary, the very nature of the organ lends itself to cyst formation. in fact, the creation of an egg culminates in the formation and ultimate rupture of a follicular cyst.

      Hope this helps -

  7. QUESTION:
    Would an ultrasound always show ovarian cysts if they are there?
    I don't mean to say that cysts might not show because they're so tiny, but rather, is it possible that they might not show due to some sort of physical positioning of one's anatomy? Sort of like when a woman is pregnant and if the baby moves, they can't always pick up the heartbeat with the fetal monitor? Is it possible that the cysts could be sitting in such a way that the ultrasound doesn't pick them up?

    • ANSWER:
      If the ovaries could be seen on the ultrasound, we would be able to see if there were cysts on them. As you know, cysts are fluid filled sacs, and ultrasound images any fluid filled structure very well. For example, the urinary bladder is seen very well when it is full of fluid (urine). A fetal stomach is easily seen on ultrasound, due to the amniotic fluid the baby swallows. Really, the only way ovarian cysts would be missed with ultrasound is when the ovary is not visualized at all. This can happen if the patient is obese, the bladder is not full enough on transabdominal scanning, or the patient is "gassy", as ultrasound cannot see through air.

  8. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a doctor appt. next week, bt just wondering if this sounds like one. Very irregular periods, almost certain i am not pregnant, painful sex, bloating, sharp pains and cramping in lower left side of my stomach. just wondering if this sounds like I may have a cyst? thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have them also and here is some information that helped me

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.
      What causes ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.
      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).
      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?

      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

  9. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between an ovarian cyst and ovarian cancer?
    My sister has an 'ovarian cyst' 15 cm i n width..... The average cyst rarely exceeds 5 cm...... can a cyst turn into cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cyst is:

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac in the ovary. Many cysts are completely normal. These are called functional cysts. They occur as a result of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary). Functional cysts normally shrink over time, usually in about 1 to 3 months. If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may want to check you again in 1 to 3 months to make sure the cyst has gotten smaller. In certain cases, your doctor may want you to take birth control pills so you won't ovulate. If you don't ovulate, you won't form cysts.

      If you are menopausal and are not having periods, you shouldn't form functional cysts. If you do have a cyst, your doctor will probably want you to have a sonogram so he or she can look at the cyst. What your doctor decides to do after that depends on your age, the way the cyst looks on the sonogram and if you're having symptoms such as pain, bloating, feeling full after eating just a little, and constipation.

      Ovarian Cancer:

      Recognizing ovarian cancer symptoms

      Ovarian cancer often shows no obvious signs or symptoms until late in its development. Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

      General abdominal discomfort and/or pain (gas, indigestion, pressure, swelling, bloating, cramps)

      Nausea, diarrhea, constipation, or frequent urination

      Loss of appetite

      Feeling of fullness even after a light meal

      Weight gain or loss with no known reason

      Abnormal bleeding from the vagina

      These symptoms may be caused by ovarian cancer or by other, less serious conditions. It is important to check with a doctor about any of these symptoms.

      To help find the cause of symptoms, a doctor evaluates a woman's medical history. The doctor also performs a physical exam and orders diagnostic tests. Some exams and tests that may be useful are described below:

      Pelvic exam includes feeling the uterus, vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, and rectum to find any abnormality in their shape or size. (A Pap test, a good test for cancer of the cervix, is often done along with the pelvic exam, but it is not a reliable way to find or diagnose ovarian cancer.)

      Ultrasound refers to the use of high-frequency sound waves. These waves, which cannot be heard by humans, are aimed at the ovaries. The pattern of the echoes they produce creates a picture called a sonogram.

      CA-125 assay is a blood test used to measure the level of CA-125, a tumor marker that is often found in higher-than-normal amounts in the blood of women with ovarian cancer.

      Lower GI series, or barium enema, is a series of x-rays of the colon and rectum. The pictures are taken after the patient is given an enema with a white, chalky solution containing barium. The barium outlines the colon and rectum on the x-ray, making tumors or other abnormal areas easier to see.

      CT (or CAT) scan is a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine.

      Biopsy is the removal of tissue for examination under a microscope. A pathologist studies the tissue to make a diagnosis. To obtain the tissue, the surgeon performs a laparotomy (an operation to open the abdomen). If cancer is suspected, the surgeon performs an oophorectomy (removal of the entire ovary). This is important because, if cancer is present, removing just a sample of tissue by cutting through the outer layer of the ovary could allow cancer cells to escape and cause the disease to spread.

      If the diagnosis is ovarian cancer, the doctor will want to learn the stage (or extent) of disease. Staging is a careful attempt to find out whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to what parts of the body. Staging may involve surgery, x-rays and other imaging procedures, and lab tests. Knowing the stage of the disease helps the doctor plan treatment.

  10. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts?
    Went to the doctor the other day as my husband and I are ttc without any luck. I explained to her that I had had some weird stomach cramps and my cycle was off. She sent me for an ultra sound which found that i have cysts around my ovaries. She said it was nothing to panic about but that she wanted to see me early next week. Does anyone know anything about them and will they affect me ttc in the future?
    ttc=trying to conceive

    • ANSWER:
      I HAVE HAD COUNTLESS CYSTS ON MY OVARIES. MOST GO AWAY AND SOME HAS TO BE TAKEN OFF BY SURGERY WHICH I HAVE HAD DONE. I STILL THOUGH GOT PREGNANT TWICE. I HAVE A 4 YEAR OLD THEN LAST YEAR HAD A MISCARRIAGE.
      YOU CAN STILL GET PREGNANT EVEN IF YOU HAVE CYSTS ON YOUR OVARIES. I ALSO HAD ENDOMETRIOSIS AND CONCEIVED.

      What are ovarian cysts?
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. Clomid or Serophene, which are drugs used to induce ovulation, can raise the risk of getting this type of cyst. These cysts are almost never associated with cancer.

      There are also other types of cysts:

      Endometriomas. These cysts develop in women who have endometriosis, when tissue from the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus. The tissue may attach to the ovary and form a growth. These cysts can be painful during sexual intercourse and during menstruation.
      Cystadenomas. These cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      Dermoid cysts. The cells in the ovary are able to make hair, teeth, and other growing tissues that become part of a forming ovarian cyst. These cysts can become large and cause pain.
      Polycystic ovaries. The eggs mature within the follicles, or sacs, but the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. The cycle repeats, follicles continue to grow inside the ovary, and cysts form. For more information about polycystic ovaries, refer to our FAQ on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many women have ovarian cysts without having any symptoms. Sometimes, though, a cyst will cause these problems:

      pressure, fullness, or pain in the abdomen
      dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      problems passing urine completely
      pain during sexual intercourse
      weight gain
      painful menstrual periods and abnormal bleeding
      nausea or vomiting
      breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      pain with fever and vomiting
      sudden, severe abdominal pain
      faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      rapid breathing

      How are ovarian cysts found?
      Since ovarian cysts may not cause symptoms, they are usually found during a routine pelvic exam. During this exam, your doctor is able to feel the swelling of the cyst on your ovary. Once a cyst is found, the doctor may perform an ultrasound, which uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see how the cyst is shaped; its size and location; and whether it s fluid-filled, solid, or mixed. A pregnancy test is also done. Hormone levels (such as LH, FSH, estradiol, and testosterone) may also be checked. Your doctor may want to do other tests as well.

      To find out if the cyst might be cancerous, your doctor may do a blood test to measure a substance in the blood called CA-125. The amount of this protein is higher if a woman has ovarian cancer. However, some ovarian cancers do not make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. There are also non-cancerous diseases that increase the levels of CA-125, like uterine fibroids and endometriosis. These non-cancerous causes of increased CA-125 are more common in women under 35, while ovarian cancer is very uncommon in this age group. For this reason, the CA-125 test is recommended mostly for women over age 35, who are at high risk for the disease and have a cyst that is partially solid.

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      Laparoscopy if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.
      Laparotomy if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.
      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      Ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. Fortunately, the vast majority of cysts don t cause any symptoms, are not related to cancer, and go away on their own. Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice any changes in your period, pain in the pelvic area, or any of the major symptoms listed above. A pelvic exam, possibly with an ultrasound, can help determine if a cyst is causing the problem. If a woman is not seeking pregnancy and develops functional cysts, frequently, future cysts may be prevented by taking oral contraceptives, Depo-Provera, or Norplant.

      When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?
      Functional ovarian cysts usually occur during the childbearing years. Most often, cysts in women of this age group are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50-70) with ovarian cysts have a higher risk of ovarian cancer. At any age, if you think you have a cyst, it s important to tell your doctor.

      GOOD LUCK

  11. QUESTION:
    If its fluid filled cysts will they drain them?
    I go tomorrow for a diagnostic mammogram and breast ultrasound. I have been told from the sound of my symptoms it will be fibrocystic breast. If it does turn out to be cysts will they drain them? It us causing me extreme constant pain in both of my breasts that is not eased with ibuprofen or tylonol. Will they drain them right after the tests or will I have to go in again or to another doctor to get them drained? I am going to an imaging center for the tests

    • ANSWER:
      Yes they will drain them... I had a cyst on my ovary & one in my right breast (size of a gold ball) and they were trying to figure out how to get in & fix it... The pain was unbearable I couldnt even have sex... When I did try the darn thing ruptured and I slept for a week (because of the medicine they put me on)... I cant even describe how I felt... Just know I couldnt even lift my finger without pain shoot through my body...

      So make sure they get this taken care of asap because if it ruptures you will be in far worse pain than you are now...

  12. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    What is the normal size of an ovarian cyst? And how large does it have to be before it is considered abnormal? Also what does it mean if fluid is seen when you have an ultrasound done ?

    • ANSWER:
      Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed. Ovarian cysts have nothing to do with disease. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment.
      A woman may develop 1 or more of them.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst.

  13. QUESTION:
    Bad pains! Ovarian cyst?
    My grandma is currently suffering very bad pains on her lower left side. She can walk but not without being in a great amount of pain. She was diagnosed with a ovarian cyst about a week ago. She is being sick and the pain is going from the lower front side round to her kidney on the left side.
    What could be the cause and what should I do.
    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are benign and naturally go away on their own without treatment. These cysts cause little, if any, symptoms. But in a rare case, your doctor may detect a cancerous cystic ovarian mass during a routine examination.
      Ovarian torsion is another rare complication of ovarian cysts. This is when a large cyst causes an ovary to twist or move from its original position. Blood supply to the ovary is cut off, and if not treated, it can cause damage or death to the ovarian tissue. Although uncommon, ovarian torsion accounts for nearly 3 percent of emergency gynecological surgeries.
      Ruptured cysts, which are also rare, can cause intense pain and internal bleeding. This complication increases your risk of an infection and can be life-threatening if left untreated.
      Diagnosing an Ovarian Cyst | Diagnosis
      Your doctor can detect an ovarian cyst during a routine pelvic examination. He or she may notice swelling on one of your ovaries and order an ultrasound to confirm the presence of a cyst. An ultrasound is an imaging test that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce an image of your internal organs. Ultrasounds help determine the size, location, shape, and composition (solid or fluid-filled) of a cyst.
      Other imaging tools used to diagnose ovarian cysts include:
      CT scan: a body imaging device used to create cross-sectional images of internal organs
      MRI: a test that uses magnetic fields to produce in-depth images of internal organs
      Ultrasound: an imaging device used to visualize the ovary
      Because the majority of cysts disappear after a few weeks or months, your doctor may not immediately recommend a treatment plan. Instead, he or she may repeat the ultrasound in a few weeks or months to check your condition.
      If there aren t any changes in your condition or if the cyst increases in size, your doctor will request additional tests to determine other causes of your symptoms.
      They include:
      pregnancy test: to determine whether or not you re pregnant
      hormone level test: to check for hormone-related issues, such as too much estrogen or progesterone
      CA 125 Blood test: to screen for ovarian cancer
      Read more

      Treatment for an Ovarian Cyst
      If a cyst does not go away on its own or if it grows larger, your doctor may recommend treatment to shrink or remove the cyst.
      Birth Control Pills
      If you suffer from recurrent ovarian cysts, your doctor can prescribe oral contraceptives to stop ovulation and prevent the development of new cysts. Oral contraceptives can also reduce your risk of ovarian cancer. The risk of ovarian cancer is higher in postmenopausal women.
      Laparoscopy
      If your cyst is small and an imaging test rules out cancer, your doctor can perform a laparoscopy to surgically remove the cyst. The procedure involves your doctor making a tiny incision near your navel and then inserting a small instrument into your abdomen to remove the cyst.
      Laparotomy
      If you have a large cyst, he or she can surgically remove the cyst through a large incision in your abdomen. Your doctor will conduct an immediate biopsy, and if he or she determines that the cyst is cancerous, he or she may perform a hysterectomy to remove your ovaries and uterus.

  14. QUESTION:
    Has any one suffered with cysts in there breasts?
    i have 2 small cysts, but the hospital wont remove them, im going back for a 2nd visit to the consultant next week.
    Regards to purple,, could you email me please regarding how you were first diagnosed, only if you dont mind. im really sorry to hear your diagnosis. i just cant understand why the doctors didnt remove my cysts in the first place.

    • ANSWER:
      If you had imaging studies (specifically ultrasound), and the cysts are truely simple cysts and had none of the nine malignant characteristics, that sounds right. We make cysts in all kinds of parts of our bodies (liver, kidney, breast, ovaries to name a few). Cysts are simply fluid filled sacs. They are not cancerous in almost ALL cases. The only time a doctor will remove a cyst is if it is causing you pain or if it doesn't look like a classical cyst on imaging. Cysts come and go. If you remove a cyst, you more than likely will grow more. Aspirating a cyst with a needle is an alternative, but in 50% of the time, the cyst will return. If you are not having pain, generally we leave cysts alone. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

      I am unsure of the specifics of the woman, with breast cancer, who answered ahead of me. I can tell you that simple breast cysts do not become cancer. Someone who has breast cysts can develop breast cancer, but that is unrelated to the cysts. Anyone can get breast cancer, and having breast cysts does not raise your risks.

      Here is some things from the "experts":

      "Benign breast disease is a large group of non-cancerous conditions of the breast that includes cysts, fibroadenomas, and hyperplasia. Of all the types of benign breast disease, only hyperplasia is related to breast cancer."

      http://www.yourdiseaserisk.harvard.edu/hccpquiz.pl?func=show&quiz=breast&page=risk_list

      "Virtually all breast cysts identified as simple cysts by ultrasound are benign and remain so. It is estimated that perhaps 1 in 1,000 cysts may harbor a tumor (not necessarily malignant). These can usually be identified by their ultrasound appearance. Women with cysts are not at greater risk for the development of cancer although this risk may be minimally elevated if there is a positive family history for breast cancer (mother, sister, daughter)."

      http://www.cpmc.org/services/women/breast/breast_cyst.html

  15. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    About a month ago i went to the hospital because i was complaining of pressure pain in my pelvic area (i.e. the uterus, lower stomach) and they did a CT scan and noticed clear pelvic fluid and decided it was from a cyst that had ruptured. I then went to my gyno on wednesday and he did my pelvic exam and noticed I had blood at the top of my uterus and I actually started my period 3 hours later but he wanted to do an ultrasound on me a week after i started my period to see my ovaries when they r most enlarged to see if im prone to cysts. The period I had was so bad like I had really bad cramping and the period ended today im pretty sure and I still feel like bloated out like pressure is just sitting there in my pelvic area/lower abdomen. i also feel like im having cramping around that area almost like menstrual cramping at some little times. I also feel like there is a puffiness feeling in the area below my stomach. Could this mean I may have another cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      Usually women don't ever hear about their cysts, we get that "cramping" pain near our periods when the cyst ruptures but we never know what it is...

      When I was a teenager I had what they call poly-cystic ovaries, I'd get more than one cyst at a time (very painful)

      Hormonal therapies can do wonders as far as that goes.

      To answer your question, yes you could have another cyst but the puffiness doesn't mean that you do, your only clear way to find out is to visit your doctor and they will either do an ultrasound or another medical imaging proceedure to see if there is another cyst.

      For the moment all you can do is manage the pain, much like you would during your cramping before or during your period.

      Heated Blanket, Warm Bath, Plenty of Rest, Midol or Pamprin (extra strength)

  16. QUESTION:
    can ovarian cysts cause infertility?
    my doctor just told me that i have ovarian cysts on both of my ovaries. i just wanted to know if they cause infertility

    • ANSWER:
      yes! they sure can. have em checked out..

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?
      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?
      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      How are ovarian cysts treated? continued...
      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

      Ovarian Cysts At A Glance
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures.
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons.
      When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one.
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound.
      The treatment of ovarian cysts varies from observation and monitoring to surgical procedures.

      hope that this info helps.

  17. QUESTION:
    Corpus Luteum Cyst?
    I went for a 4-D ultrasound from an imaging center (not my doctor) and was told I have a corpus luteum cyst. I'm not sure how big they usually are, but she told me mine was 5.09 cm x 4.04 cm x 2.98 cm. That seems pretty big to me. Is it normal for them to be that big? And when will it go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Joshsgirl,

      This type of ovarian cyst occurs after an egg has been released from a follicle. After this happens, the follicle becomes what is known as a corpus luteum. If a pregnancy doesn't occur, the corpus luteum usually breaks down and disappears. It may, however, fill with fluid or blood and stay on the ovary. Usually, this cyst is on only 1 side and produces no symptoms. I've seen them bigger.... Sometimes if they get too big and filled with blood they are removed surgically, and referred to as chocolate cysts because the blood within them has turned brown and resembles liquid chocolate. If I were you, I'd make an appointment with a GYN, show him your ultrasound so your situation can be monitored. Hopefully things will resolve themselves and you will not have any further problems.

      Best wishes,

      S

  18. QUESTION:
    What's a cysts ?????????
    How are they formed ? How do they go away?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed capsule or sac-like structure, typically filled with liquid, semisolid or gaseous material - very much like a blister.Cysts occur within tissue, and can affect any part of the body. They vary in size from microscopic to the size of some team-sport balls - large cysts can displace internal organs.A cyst is not a normal part of the tissue where it is located. It has a distinct membrane and division on nearby tissue - the outer or capsular portion of a cyst is called the cyst wall. If the sac is filled with pus it is not a cyst, it is an abscess.The English word cyst comes from the Latin word cystis, which came from the Ancient Greek word kystis, meaning "bladder" or "pouch". What causes cysts?Tumors,Genetic conditions ,Infections ,A fault in an organ of a developing embryo ,Chronic inflammatory conditions ,Blockages of ducts in the body which cause a fluid build-up, Impact injury that breaks a vessel ,A parasite, Treatment for a cyst will depend on various factors, including the type of cyst, where it is, its size, and the degree of discomfort it is causing. A very large cyst that causes symptoms can be surgically removed. Sometimes the doctors may decide to drain or aspirate the cyst by inserting a needle or catheter into the cavity. If the cyst is not easily accessible, drainage or aspiration is often done with the help of radiologic imaging so that the doctor can accurately guide the needle/catheter into the target area. Sometimes the aspirated liquid is examined under a microscope to determine whether cancerous cells are present. If doctors suspect the cyst may be cancerous it may be removed surgically, or a biopsy of the capsule (cyst wall) may be ordered. Many cysts arise as a result of a chronic or underlying medical condition, as may be the case with fibrocystic breast disease or polycystic ovary syndrome - in such cases the focus of treatment is on the medical condition.the most common cysts.Acne cyst,Baker's cyst ,Bartholin's cyst,Breast cyst ,Chalazion cyst ,Colloid cyst ,
      Dentigerous cyst,Dermoid cyst ,Epididymal cyst ,Ovarian cyst ,Pancreatic cysts, and much more,Most cysts are benign and are caused by plugged ducts or other natural body outlets for secretions. However, some cysts may be tumors and are formed inside tumours - these can be potentially malignant. Examples include keratocysts and dermoid cysts,Signs and symptoms vary enormously, depending on what type of cyst it is. In most cases the patient becomes aware of an abnormal lump - as is usually the case with cysts of the skin or just below the skin. A cyst in the mammary glands (breasts) may be noticeable when the breasts are examined by touching them - the lump will be palpable. Breast cysts are often painful. Some cysts in the brain can cause headaches, as well as other symptoms. Many internal cysts, such as those in the kidneys or the liver may not have any symptoms and go unnoticed until an imaging scan (MRI scan, CAT scan, ultrasound) detects them. I hope that gave you an idea about the Cysts if you need anymore knowledge will be glad to help you..Good luck best wishes

  19. QUESTION:
    dr has told that i have some polycystic ovaries what does it means?
    on these i have been takeing treatment since 7 months

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic Ovaries
      The name polycystic ovary syndrome is derived from the cystic appearance of the ovaries of affected women. In 1935, Stein and Leventhal described the polycystic appearance of the ovaries of women with other symptoms that we now associate with the syndrome of PCOS. For this reason, PCOS has also been referred to as the Stein-Leventhal syndrome. Although this name is no longer used you may encounter it in other literature and should understand that it is simply a different name for PCOS.

      Polycystic is a term that simply means "many cysts." The polycystic ovary typically contains many small - usually less than 1 centimeter - cysts (fluid-filled sacs). These cysts are usually arranged around the surface of the ovary, just below the surface layer of the ovary. When examined directly or by ultrasound, these small cysts commonly are said to have a string-of-pearls appearance. The ovaries of affected women can be slightly enlarged when compared to unaffected ovaries.

      Examples of polycystic ovaries. (Click on images to enlarge.)

      Each small cyst represents a follicle, which contains a single egg or ovum that is attempting to develop to a stage where it will be ready to be released from the ovary (a process known as ovulation). However, because of the complex biochemical situation that exists in ovaries with PCOS, the development of these follicles is stopped too soon, resulting in a collection of small follicles and the lack of ovulation. This lack of ovulation is the reason why women with PCOS commonly have difficulty becoming pregnant.

      Not all women who are found to have polycystic-appearing ovaries on ultrasound have PCOS. Keep in mind, the polycystic ovary is a structural finding of the ovary, and this single finding should not be confused with the entire syndrome. In fact, many women who show no other signs or symptoms of PCOS have been found to have polycystic-appearing ovaries on ultrasound.

      Many women hear the term "polycystic ovary" and associate this with ovarian cancer. This is not the case. Polycystic ovaries are not cancer, and a diagnosis of PCOS does not mean that you have cancer. Also, having been told you have had or currently have an ovarian cyst does not mean you have PCOS. Remember, the normal ovary creates a cyst every month through the process of ovulation. The presence or history of an ovarian cyst does not make for PCOS.

  20. QUESTION:
    I have 3 cyst on my scalp??
    I ve had these two pimple like bumps on my scalp for like 4 years now... they are white... im pretty scared cause im just 15 and i dont wanna die!!! and my mom doesnt wanna take me to the doctor or anythng :( they are white about the size of a pencil eraser or maybe smaller... and they are just like a white pimple and hard! helpp me.. any suggestions on what to do!!!

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed sac-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in people of any age. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Cysts vary in size; they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump." For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (x-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CAT Scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI). Cysts may or may not produce symptoms, depending upon their size and location.

      The treatment for a cyst depends upon the cause of the cyst along with its location. Cysts that are very large and result in symptoms due to their size may be surgically removed. Sometimes the fluid contained within a cyst can be drained, or aspirated, by inserting a needle or catheter into the cyst cavity, resulting in collapse of the cyst. Radiologic imaging may be used for guidance in draining (aspirating) cyst contents if the cyst is not easily accessible.

      If there is any suspicion that a cyst is cancerous, the cyst is generally removed by surgery or a biopsy is taken of the cyst wall (capsule) to rule out malignancy. In certain cases, aspirated fluid from a cyst is examined under a microscope to determine if cancer cells are present in the cyst.

      If a cyst arises as part of a chronic medical condition (for example, in polycystic ovary syndrome or fibrocystic breast disease), treatment is generally directed at the underlying medical condition.

  21. QUESTION:
    I have 8 cysts on my breast. My doctor told me not to worry, no need for operation. Is it enough?
    My doctor gave me Vit. E (dl-alpha Tocopheryl Acetate + Selenium 400IU/50mcg) for my lifetime maintenance. I also drink carrot juice everyday. What can you say about this?

    • ANSWER:
      If you had imaging studies (specifically ultrasound), and the cysts are truely simple cysts and had no malignant characteristics, that sounds right. We make cysts in all kinds of parts of our bodies (liver, kidney, breast, ovaries to name a few). Cysts are simply fluid filled sacs. They are not cancerous in almost ALL cases. The only time a doctor will remove a cyst is if it is causing you pain or if it doesn't look like a classical cyst on imaging. Cysts come and go. If you remove a cyst, you more than likely will grow more. Aspirating a cyst with a needle is an alternative, but in 50% of the time, the cyst will return. If you are not having pain, generally we leave cysts alone. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

  22. QUESTION:
    can i use birth control while i have cyst?
    i have stopped using birth control since i had a side effect on them, i was over bleeding, my doc says that the cyst was causing it. is it true?

    • ANSWER:
      I found this Information for you hope it helps chic : What is an ovarian cyst?
      An ovarian cyst is a sac filled with fluid or a semisolid material that forms on or within one of the ovaries, the small organs in the pelvis that make female hormones and hold egg cells.
      Functional ovarian cysts, which are relatively common, should not be confused with other types of cysts that are disease-related. Conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian cancer also involve growths on the ovaries. Tell your health care provider if you have any of the symptoms listed below. He or she can determine the type of cyst you have.
      What are the symptoms of an ovarian cyst?
      Some smaller cysts cause no symptoms; you may not even know you have a cyst. Larger cysts may cause the following symptoms:

      A change in your normal menstrual bleeding (abnormal bleeding)
      Pelvic pain or a dull ache in your back
      A feeling of fullness (bloating) in your lower belly
      Pain during intercourse
      Painful periods
      Some prolonged symptoms may be associated with a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome, a hormonal imbalance that causes irregular periods and other hormone-related problems, including obesity and infertility. Other symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome include hirsutism (increased growth of body hair) and obesity.

      What causes an ovarian cyst?
      The exact cause of ovarian cysts is not known, but they tend to form when the ovary produces too much of the hormone estrogen.
      How is an ovarian cyst diagnosed?
      Your health care provider will first rule out pregnancy as the cause of your symptoms. He or she then may use the following tests to diagnose an ovarian cyst:

      A pelvic exam During this exam, the doctor uses an instrument to widen the vagina, which allows the doctor to examine the vagina, cervix and uterus. The doctor also feels the reproductive organs for any lumps or changes.
      Blood tests These tests are used to measure the levels of certain hormones in the blood.
      Ultrasound This test uses sound waves to create images of the body s internal organs. It can be used to detect cysts on the ovaries.
      Laparoscopy This is a procedure, performed in an operating room, in which the doctor inserts a small device through an incision (cut) in the abdomen. He or she views the reproductive organs and pelvic cavity using the device. During a laparoscopy, small cysts or samples of tissue for testing may be removed.
      How is an ovarian cyst treated?
      Functional ovarian cysts generally go away without treatment. Your health care provider may give you medications containing hormones (such as birth control pills) to stop ovulation. If you do not ovulate, you will not form functional cysts. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove a cyst.

      Types of surgery
      The type of surgery used depends on the size of the cyst and how it appears on the ultrasound. The different procedures used include:

      Laparoscopy This is a procedure in which the doctor inserts a small device through an incision in the abdomen. He or she views the reproductive organs and pelvic cavity using the device. If the cyst is small, the doctor can remove it through tiny incisions made in the pubic hairline.

      Laparotomy This procedure uses a bigger incision to remove the cyst. The cyst will be tested for cancer. If it is cancer, the doctor may need to remove one or both ovaries, the uterus, a fold of fatty tissue called the omentum and some lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped structures found throughout the body that produce and store infection-fighting cells, but may contain cancer cells.

      What are the complications of an ovarian cyst?
      If a cyst breaks open, it can cause severe pain and swelling in the abdomen.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      Taking medications that contain hormones (such as birth control pills) will stop ovulation. However, many women taking low-dose oral contraceptives may still ovulate. Although there has been no study that shows that oral contraceptive pills reduce the formation of the ovarian cysts, many physicians still do prescribe this regimen.

      When should I call my health care provider?
      Call your health care provider if any of the following occur:
      Your menstrual periods are late, irregular, or painful
      Your abdominal pain doesn t go away
      Your abdomen becomes enlarged or swollen
      You have trouble urinating or emptying your bladder completely
      You have pain during intercourse
      You have feelings of fullness (bloating), pressure, or discomfort in your abdomen
      You lose weight for no apparent reason
      You feel generally ill

  23. QUESTION:
    what are lung cysts, what is the cause?

    • ANSWER:
      Lung cyst

      a nonspecific term usually used to describe the presence in the lung of a thin-walled, well-defined and well-circumscribed lesion, greater than 1 cm in diameter. Cysts may contain either air or fluid, but this term is usually used to refer to an air-containing lesion, or air-filled cyst. Air-filled cysts are commonly seen in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis and lymphangiomyomatosis, but can be seen in other diseases as well (see cystic pulmonary metastasis, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP)). Cysts in patients with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia probably represent pneumatocoeles (Fig.1) Honeycombing also results in the presence of cysts. This term is not usually used to refer to the focal lucencies associated with emphysema (bullae) or cystic bronchiectasis. Unlike cavities, cysts are not usually the result of necrosis.

      Cysts can be caused by:

      * Tumors
      * Genetic conditions
      * Infections
      * A fault in an organ of a developing embryo
      * A defect in the cells
      * Chronic inflammatory conditions
      * Blockages of ducts in the body which cause a fluid build-up
      * A parasite
      * Impact injury that breaks a vessel

      Treatment for a cyst will depend on various factors, including the type of cyst, where it is, its size, and the degree of discomfort it is causing.

      A very large cyst that causes symptoms can be surgically removed. Sometimes the doctors may decide to drain or aspirate the cyst by inserting a needle or catheter into the cavity. If the cyst is not easily accessible, drainage or aspiration is often done with the help of radiologic imaging so that the doctor can accurately guide the needle/catheter into the target area.

      Sometimes the aspirated liquid is examined under a microscope to determine whether cancerous cells are present.

      If doctors suspect the cyst may be cancerous it may be removed surgically, or a biopsy of the capsule (cyst wall) may be ordered.

      Many cysts arise as a result of a chronic or underlying medical condition, as may be the case with fibrocystic breast disease or polycystic ovary syndrome - in such cases the focus of treatment is on the medical condition.

  24. QUESTION:
    11 cm complex ovarian cyst?
    I wanted to ask for some advice or opinions about an 11 cm "complex cystic structure" that has been found on my ultrasound.

    It started with pain in December - I had one episode, during my period , of severe pelvic pain. I waited a little while and the pain subsided some, so I did not go to the emergency room. I DID go to a doctor (actually, an NP), and she told me that I likely had a small ovarian cyst that had ruptured. She wanted me to go for bloodwork and an ultrasound, and follow up with a gynecologist at some point.

    I did the blood work right away (CBC, thyroid and metabolic panels - and they were fine), but the ultrasound got put off. Had a normal period this month.

    On Wednesday, I finally went for the pelvic ultrasound. I received a call THAT NIGHT from my NP that I needed to get an appointment with a gynecologist within the week.

    This is what the ultrasound results said:

    "There is a large, 11.4 x 8.3 x 7.2 cm, structure with diffuse low level echoes superior and posterior to the uterus abutting both right and left adnexa. On Doppler imaging, there are foci of flow within the structure. There is through transmission. This probably arises from one of the ovaries, maybe the right, but this is not certain."

    I got an appointment with ANOTHER NP (a gynecological one) the next day. She did a brief exam and showed my test results to the doctor there. After consulting with each other, they felt that my cyst is likely a complex ovarian cyst, and, more specifically, a dermoid cyst. Due to its size, and the fact that I had pain in December, they do not think that it is something that will go away on its own.

    I am going for another ultrasound (probably a transvaginal one this time) on Thursday at a different office, at which time I will also speak with a doctor who is a gynecologist AND a surgeon. If I need surgery, he'll likely be the one to do it.

    Surgery seems inevitable given the size of this monster and the fact that I now definitely feel something in there

    • ANSWER:
      Hi sorry your having pain. Er what is your question ??
      I have had dermiod cyst removed myself but not that big. It was explained to me in simple terms. Simply cysts are plain cysts with nothing in then but clar fluid so on scan will be totally black.
      But a dermid is a complex cyst as it contains other tissue.

      Sorry to gross you out but dermiod cysts have random tissu cells in them like hair and muscle and the gyn said even can contain tooth type matieral yukkkk lol.

      I had it removed as i was getting pain. If you have a specific qustion let us know but i could not see one in the text you posted.

  25. QUESTION:
    What happens after hemorrhagic cyst ruptures?
    Last week I was sent to imaging after discussing my abdominal pain with my doctor. We discovered I have ovarian cyst on each of my ovaries. The pain was from one on the right hemorrhaging. After imaging I was sent for blood work. I won't see my doctor again until next friday. I am wondering what happens to the blood from the hemorraged cyst? What will the next steps most likely be? Thanks for any guidance I get ahead of time!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello there,
      I'm sorry to hear about your situation. I spent about 15 hours with one of my daughters in the ER. Terrible pain as you mentioned and it was a ruptured cyst. Prior to it rupturing she had terrible pain during intercourse and then while traveling she felt like a pop and her stomach area felt hot. The doctor told us the fluids would leave her system and not cause harm, but the cyst, in time, can reform again and burst. They could see it ruptured via sonogram. He suggested I put her on birth control right away and said the hormone can control the growth. Unfortunately once you have one you should always monitor and be aware. See your gyn regularly. Thank goodness the cyst was ON the actual ovary and not inside the fallopian tube. Go see a gyn and discuss birth control / hormone options. See if this can limit the growth or alleviate it.

      Best of luck to you.

  26. QUESTION:
    Complex masses on ovaries......advice plllllease!!!?
    Hello everyone... I had a partial hysterectomy on Dec. 16 due to pre cancer cells on my cervix. I thought my problems were over. Well last Tuesday I went to the hospital because I was haing left side pains and thought it was kidney stones. The doc in the ER ordered a cat scan to see if he could see them. Well it turned out I had no stones but he told me that he had seen a few things that made him a little worried so he ordered a ultrasound. The ultrasound showed I have some masses on my ovaries. He also told me that he saw some fluid in my abdomen and my liver is enlarged. I dont understand why these masses were not seen when I got my hysterectomy done and I am very concerned.
    THE REPORT:
    Findings:
    The patient has reportedly had a partial hysterectomy. Blood flow is identified in both ovaries. The right ovary measures 3.5cm in lenght and contains solid or complex nodules, the largest measuring about 1.9 x 2.2 x 2.3 cm. The left ovary measure about 4.8 cm in length and contains multiple small cystic lesions or a complex septated cystic lesion measuring about 1.6 x 2.2 x 2.3 cm, as well as a dominant area of hypoechoic but apparently solid nodularity measuring about 3.0 x 3.4 x 3.4 cm. No significant free fluid is idenified in the pelvis.
    Impression: status post partial hysterectomy. Biliateral complex ovarian masses.
    Please give me your thoughts and opinion on the findings please. And thank you to everyone!!

    • ANSWER:
      As part of the diagnostic process (that identified your pre-cancerous cervical tissue) you would have undergone medical imaging of your entire abdominal area. This imaging would include the ovaries, so it is very unlikely that these nodules were present in December. On the other hand, three months seems like a very short time to form 2cm lesions.

      It is best to look forward, rather than back. You need a medical evaluation of your ovarian issue and a proper diagnosis. The cysts may not be cancerous, so don't jump to any conclusions.

      Attached is information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for ovarian cancer. Hopefully you will not need this, but it is a good reference. Best wishes for a good long term outcome.

  27. QUESTION:
    Corpus Luteum Cyst?
    I went for a 4-D ultrasound from an imaging center (not my doctor) and was told I have a corpus luteum cyst. I'm not sure how big they usually are, but she told me mine was 5.09 cm x 4.04 cm x 2.98 cm. That seems pretty big to me. Is it normal for them to be that big? And when will it go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Corpus Luteum Cyst of Pregnancy

      by Marjorie Greenfield, M.D.
      reviewed and revised by Marjorie Greenfield, M.D.
      Many women go for a routine ultrasound or pelvic examination early in their pregnancy and come away with the surprise finding of an ovarian cyst. Usually, this cyst comes from the corpus luteum. After an egg is released from the ovary, the corpus luteum is responsible for making the hormone progesterone. It is this hormone that prepares the uterus for pregnancy.

      A typical corpus luteum is round and fluid-filled and can range in size from less than two centimeters (about an inch) to six centimeters or more. On ultrasound, a fluid-filled (cystic) structure greater than three centimeters is technically classified as an ovarian cyst, even though it may well represent a normal finding.

      Ovarian cysts usually don't cause any symptoms. In fact, corpus luteum cysts appear toward the end of the menstrual cycle, last into early pregnancy, and then usually resolve over a period of time without any special treatment.

      Complications of ovarian cysts
      Occasionally a cyst will rupture, causing several hours of pain, followed by an aching feeling for a few more days. The pain often will be severe enough for a woman to go to the doctor or the emergency room, but the cause of the pain is usually obvious on ultrasound and the symptoms usually have begun to resolve by the time an evaluation is done.

      A cyst will in rare instances cause the ovary to twist (ovarian torsion), cutting off its blood supply and resulting in pain and nausea. Ovarian torsion requires surgery to untwist the ovary and remove the cyst. The symptoms of a ruptured cyst or ovarian torsion are not subtle. A woman usually knows there is something terribly wrong and seeks medical care.

      How to deal with a cyst
      If you have an ovarian cyst with only mild symptoms, rest assured that a significant complication is not likely to occur and you can go about your regular activities. Sometimes a cyst ruptures during sex, so your practitioner might recommend avoiding intercourse until the cyst resolves. Discuss with your practitioner any other activity concerns you might have. And remember: Corpus luteum cysts usually resolve painlessly by the beginning of the second trimester.
      http://www.drspock.com/article/0,1510,5335,00.html

  28. QUESTION:
    can a doctor at the er tell if a cyst on an ovarie is benign or cancer by having a ct scan?

    • ANSWER:
      Screening and diagnosis
      A cyst on your ovary may be found during a pelvic exam. If a cyst is suspected, doctors often advise further testing to determine its type and whether you need treatment.

      Typically, doctors address several questions to determine a diagnosis and to aid in management decisions:

      Shape. Is your cyst irregularly shaped?
      Size. What size is it?
      Composition. Is it filled with fluid, solid or mixed? Fluid-filled cysts aren't likely to be cancerous. Those that are solid or mixed filled with fluid and solid may require further evaluation to determine if cancer is present.
      To identify the type of cyst, your doctor may perform the following procedures:

      They don't list it, but I am sure they would do a needle aspiration to see if there is fluid in it.

      Pregnancy test. A positive pregnancy test may suggest that your cyst is a corpus luteum cyst, which can develop when the ruptured follicle that released your egg reseals and fills with fluid.
      Pelvic ultrasound. In this painless procedure, a wand-like device (transducer) is used to send and receive high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound). The transducer can be moved over your abdomen and inside your vagina, creating an image of your uterus and ovaries on a video screen. This image can then be photographed and analyzed by your doctor to confirm the presence of a cyst, help identify its location and determine whether it's solid, filled with fluid or mixed.
      Laparoscopy. Using a laparoscope a slim, lighted instrument inserted into your abdomen through a small incision your doctor can see your ovaries and remove the ovarian cyst.
      CA 125 blood test. Blood levels of a protein called cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) often are elevated in women with ovarian cancer. If you develop an ovarian cyst that is partially solid and you are at high risk of ovarian cancer, your doctor may test the level of CA 125 in your blood to determine whether your cyst could be cancerous. Elevated CA 125 levels can also occur in noncancerous conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids and pelvic inflammatory disease.

  29. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst problem?
    So, i know that i have an ovarian cyst and i have for several months now and it isn't going away. i looked up symptoms and i have all of them except for two. and couple of them fell under "if you have these symptoms, get help right away". But my mom won't let me get it checked out somewhere for i dont know what reason. so do you think doing something like talking to the school nurse would help me to be able to get this checked out? (oh and i'm in 9th grade)

    • ANSWER:
      How are you sure that you have one? Has a doctor told you for sure that you have one? A lot of cysts that you can get on your ovaries are OK and often come and go by themselves. However, there is a few types of cysts that you do need help for. Why wouldn't your mum let you get it checked out?

      Here's some info about different types of ovarian cysts:

      Follicular cyst: This type of simple cyst can form when ovulation does not occur or when a mature follicle involutes (collapses on itself). It usually forms at the time of ovulation and can grow to about 2.3 inches in diameter. The rupture of this type of cyst can create sharp severe pain on the side of the ovary on which the cyst appears. This sharp pain (sometimes called mittelschmerz) occurs in the middle of the menstrual cycle, during ovulation. About a fourth of women with this type of cyst experience pain. Usually, these cysts produce no symptoms and disappear by themselves within a few months. A woman's doctor monitors these to make sure they disappear and looks at treatment options if they do not.

      Corpus luteum cyst: This type of functional ovarian cyst occurs after an egg has been released from a follicle. After this happens, the follicle becomes what is known as a corpus luteum. If a pregnancy doesn't occur, the corpus luteum usually breaks down and disappears. It may, however, fill with fluid or blood and stay on the ovary. Usually, this cyst is on only 1 side and produces no symptoms.

      Hemorrhagic cyst: This type of functional cyst occurs when bleeding occurs within a cyst. Symptoms such as abdominal pain on 1 side of the body may be present with this type of cyst.

      Dermoid cyst: This is an abnormal cyst that usually affects younger women and may grow to 6 inches in diameter. This cyst is similar to those present on skin tissue and can contain fat and occasionally bone, hair, and cartilage.

      The ultrasound image of this cyst type can vary because of the spectrum of contents, but a CT scan and MRI can show the presence of fat and dense calcifications. These cysts are also called mature cystic teratomas.

      They can become inflamed. They can also twist around (a condition known as ovarian torsion), causing severe abdominal pain.

      Endometriomas or endometrioid cysts: This type of cyst is formed when endometrial tissue (the mucous membrane that makes up the inner layer of the uterine wall) grows in the ovaries. It affects women during the reproductive years and may cause chronic pelvic pain associated with menstruation.

      Endometriosis is the presence of endometrial glands and tissue outside the uterus.

      Women with endometriosis may have problems with fertility because 80% of all pelvic endometriosis is found in the ovary (1 or both).

      These cysts, often filled with dark, reddish-brown blood, may range in size from 0.75-8 inches.

      Polycystic-appearing ovary: Polycystic-appearing ovary is diagnosed based on its enlarged size usually twice normal with small cysts present around the outside of the ovary. This condition can be found in "normal" women and in women with endocrine disorders. An ultrasound is used to view the ovary in diagnosing this condition.

      Polycystic-appearing ovary is different from the polycystic ovarian syndrome, which includes other symptoms in addition to the presence ovarian cysts. Polycystic ovarian syndrome involves metabolic and cardiovascular risks linked to insulin resistance. These risks include increased glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes, and high blood pressure.

      Polycystic ovarian syndrome is associated with infertility, abnormal bleeding, increased incidences of pregnancy loss, and pregnancy-related complications.

      Polycystic ovarian syndrome is extremely common and is thought to occur in 4-7% of women of reproductive age and is associated with an increased risk for endometrial cancer.

      More tests than an ultrasound alone are required to diagnose polycystic ovarian syndrome.

  30. QUESTION:
    Ovarian complex cyst please explain?
    I just got my ultrasound results today and a cyst was found on my left ovary. The report says " The left ovary is bulky with dimensions of 50x49x39 mm (49ml) It contains a 33 mm complex cyst containing numerous internal echoes."

    What is a complex cyst and what are internal echoes? I was referred to a specialist in concerns to this and also had to do a tumor marker test which came back clear. I am trying to concieve will this cyst prevent me from falling pregnant?? Can anyone explain this to me?

    • ANSWER:
      Ultrasound is a scan that uses high frequency sound waves to demonstrate internal body structures. It is a commonly used to study the developing fetus, abdominal and pelvic organs, muscles and joints, the heart and blood vessels. Other names for an ultrasound scan include sonogram and ultrasonography.

      The ultrasound scan sends out high frequency sound waves, directed at the internal body part being examined. The reflected sounds, or echoes , are recorded to create an image that can be viewed on a monitor. The sound waves are emitted and received from a small, hand-held probe. The high frequency of the sound means the human ear can t hear it hence, it is called ultrasound.

      A complex cyst means that there is something going on in the cyst. There may have been some blood or some tissue growth within. The internal echoes mentioned in the report show that it is complex as opposed to simple.

      A simple cyst is just full of fluid. No solid structures, mucus or blood within.

      It's good news that the tumour marker test came back clear. That rules out cancer.

  31. QUESTION:
    ectopic pregnancy? ovarian cyst? help please?
    I have this pain that comes and goes, it is pretty intense sometimes. Its low and to my right side of my body, near where i think my ovaries would be.
    some of my symptoms are: The pain. nausea. peeing alot. decreased appetite. sleeping alot [but i think its just stress]

    I want to see an obgyn, but i dont have one, i have never seen one.
    What will they do if i go in for these problems?
    What tests will they have to do?
    Can i just call like i normally do to make an appointment and then ask to see an obgyn? or do i need a referal from my doctor or something?
    I have NO idea how this goes...i dont have my mum anymore so this kind of thing is really hard on me to figure out.

    Im only 17 and im scared.

    • ANSWER:
      When I had an ovarian cyst, I had some of those same symptoms. I was in intense pain, I peed alot, I didn't feel like eating. However, the most distinctive sympton was a feeling of fullness in my abdomen. Not fullness in the sense of hunger, but in the sense that that entire area felt bloated. It was very uncomfortable.

      A cyst or ectopic pregnancy are both very serious conditions. I would strongly suggest going to the ER now so that whatever is causing you pain can be determined. If you decide that you don't want to go to the ER, then call your GP for an appointment. Ask for the soonest one and go to it. When I did this, my GP listened to my symptoms and sent me to the local hospital for a CT scan and sonogram.

      CT Scan - you have two hours to drink 2 very nasty tasting drinks. After you drink those drinks, you're brought into the scanning room. You lay down on a table and are given an IV of tracer fluid, which will highlight different organs on the XRay. When the IV is opened, you get this warm feeling on your bum, almost like you peed your pants. Then they scan you.

      I had the CT scan and sonogram done on two different days. The sonogram consists of the nurse inserting a wand into your vagina. This wand projects an image of your uterus and ovaries onto a screen.

      They used both to determine that I had a cyst. The CT scan gave the location and rough size, while the sonogram gave a more exact size and density of the cyst.

      Again, I would suggest that if it's causing you pain, you should go to the ER and not wait to see your doctor. As for when you should call your GP vs. an OBGYN, that depends entirely on your health plan. With most HMOs, you have to have a referral from your GP. With most PPOs, you can call and ask if they are accepting your health plan.

  32. QUESTION:
    How can they tell?
    Hows can they tell the difference between a cyst and tumour on an ultrasound? What charaterstics do they have that differ from one another?

    • ANSWER:
      What is a cyst?

      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure that is not a normal part of the tissue where it is found. Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in persons of any age. Cysts usually contain a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Cysts vary in size; they may be detectable only under a microscope or they can grow so large that they displace normal organs and tissues. The outer wall of a cyst is called the capsule.
      What are the causes of a cyst?

      Cysts can arise through a variety of processes in the body, including:

      * "Wear and tear" or simple obstructions to the flow of fluid
      * Infections
      * Tumors
      * Chronic inflammatory conditions
      * Genetic (inherited) conditions
      * Defects in developing organs in the embryo

      What are the signs and symptoms of a cyst and how are they diagnosed?

      Sometimes you can feel a cyst yourself when you feel an abnormal "lump". For example, cysts of the skin or tissues beneath the skin are usually noticeable. Cysts in the mammary glands (breasts) also may be palpable (meaning that you can feel them when you examine the area with your fingers). Cysts of internal organs such as the kidneys or liver may not produce any symptoms or may not be detected by the affected individual. These cysts often are first discovered by imaging studies (x-ray, ultrasound, computerized tomography or CAT Scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or MRI).
      What are the types of cysts?

      There are hundreds of types of cysts that can arise in the body. Some of the more well-known types of cysts are:

      * Cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease)
      * Ovarian cysts
      * Cysts within the thyroid gland
      * Baker cyst (popliteal) behind the knee
      * Ganglion cysts of the joints and tendons
      * Cysts of the glands within the eyelid, termed chalazions
      * Sebaceous cysts of the small glands in the skin

      The majority of cysts are benign, but some may produce symptoms due to their size and/or location. Rarely, cysts can be associated with malignant tumors (cancers) or serious infections. If you're concerned about any abnormal swelling or "lump," talk to your doctor. He or she can recommend appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the cyst.
      What is the treatment for a cyst?

      The treatment for a cyst depends upon the cause of the cyst along with its location. Cysts that are very large and result in symptoms due to their size may be surgically removed. Sometimes the fluid contained within a cyst can be drained, or aspirated, by inserting a needle or catheter into the cyst cavity, resulting in collapse of the cyst. Radiologic imaging may be used for guidance in draining (aspirating) cyst contents if the cyst is not easily accessible.

      If there is any suspicion that a cyst is cancerous, the cyst is generally removed by surgery, or a biopsy is taken of the cyst wall (capsule) to rule out malignancy. In certain cases, aspirated fluid from a cyst is examined under a microscope to determine if cancer cells are present in the cyst.

      If a cyst arises as part of a chronic medical condition (for example, in polycystic ovary syndrome or fibrocystic breast disease), treatment is generally directed at the underlying medical condition.

      not sure what type of tumor you are referring to but if you go to www.webmd.com you can read more information on cysts and tumors. Hope this helps.

  33. QUESTION:
    Help I've been experiencing pain in my right ovary and in my right leg?

    could it be cancer (ovarian cancer)
    just had my period five days a go

    • ANSWER:
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many ovarian cysts don't cause symptoms. Others can cause

      * pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdomen pelvic pain
      * dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      * problems passing urine completely
      *pain during sex
      * weight gain
      * pain during your period
      * abnormal bleeding
      * nausea or vomiting
      * breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      * pain with fever and vomiting
      * sudden, severe abdominal pain
      * faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      * rapid breathing

      How are ovarian cysts found?
      Doctors most often find ovarian cysts during routine pelvic exams. The doctor may feel the swelling of a cyst on the ovary. Once a cyst is found, tests are done to help plan treatment. Tests include:

      An ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see the cyst's:

      shape, size, location, mass if it is fluid-filled, solid, or mixed

      A pregnancy test. This test may be given to rule out pregnancy.
      Hormone level tests. Hormone levels may be checked to see if there are hormone-related problems.
      A blood test. This test is done to find out if the cyst may be cancerous. The test measures a substance in the blood called cancer-antigen 125 (CA-125). The amount of CA-125 is higher with ovarian cancer. But some ovarian cancers don't make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. Some noncancerous diseases also raise CA-125 levels. Those diseases include uterine fibroids (YOO-tur-ihn FEYE-broidz) and endometriosis. Noncancerous causes of higher CA-125 are more common in women younger than 35. Ovarian cancer is very rare in this age group. The CA-125 test is most often given to women who:
      * are older than 35
      * are at high risk for ovarian cancer
      * have a cyst that is partly solid

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. If you have a cyst, you may be told to wait and have a second exam in 1 to 3 months. Your doctor will check to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who:

      are in their childbearing years
      have no symptoms
      have a fluid-filled cyst
      It may be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. Your doctor may want to remove the cyst if you are postmenopausal, or if it:

      doesn't go away after several menstrual cycles
      gets larger
      looks odd on the ultrasound
      causes pain
      The two main surgeries are:

      Laparoscopy (lap-uh-ROSS-kuh-pee) done if the cyst is small and looks benign (noncancerous) on the ultrasound. While you are under general anesthesia, a very small cut is made above or below your navel. A small instrument that acts like a telescope is put into your abdomen. Then your doctor can remove the cyst.

      Laparotomy (lap-uh-ROT-uh-mee) done if the cyst is large and may be cancerous. While you are under general anesthesia, larger incisions are made in the stomach to remove the cyst. The cyst is then tested for cancer. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to take out the ovary and other tissues, like the uterus. If only one ovary is taken out, your body is still fertile and can still produce estrogen.

      Birth control pills. If you keep forming functional cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to stop you from ovulating. If you don t ovulate, you are less likely to form new cysts. You can also use Depo-Provera . It is a hormone that is injected into muscle. It prevents ovulation for 3 months at a time.

      Can ovarian cysts be prevented?
      No, ovarian cysts cannot be prevented. The good news is that most cysts:

      don't cause symptoms
      are not cancerous
      go away on their own
      Talk to your doctor or nurse if you notice:

      changes in your period
      pain in the pelvic area
      any of the major symptoms of cysts

      When are women most likely to have ovarian cysts?
      Most functional ovarian cysts occur during childbearing years. And most of those cysts are not cancerous. Women who are past menopause (ages 50 70) with ovarian

  34. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cysts, or something else???
    A few days ago I started getting a pain in the area where my female organs are. It was sore across my entire pelvic area. I was complaining about feeling bloated, gassy, and swollen in that area. Then yesterday I started spotting which is not normal for me. Now I can pinpoint the source of the pain and it kind of radiates through that general region. It gets really painful at times and the rest of the time its a dull pain. I am on birth control, which is supposed to help with cysts. Is this possibly a cyst or what else could it be?? I have a drs appointment tomorrow morning but I just wanted to get other's opinions, experiences, etc.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Spotting should always be checked by your doctor. A good gynaecologist will be able to help. You will probably need to have a pelvic ultrasound scan to help diagnose the problem. You will be told to drink lots of water before you go for it--about 8 glasses. Ultrasounds are non-invasive but sometimes to get a better view they are done internally, so be prepared for that.

      A pelvic ultrasound uses sound waves to make a picture of the organs and structures in the lower belly (pelvis).

      A pelvic ultrasound looks at:

      * The bladder, ovaries, uterus, cervix, and fallopian tubes of a woman. See a picture of female organs seen on pelvic ultrasound.
      * The bladder, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles of a man. See a picture of male organs seen on pelvic ultrasound.

      Organs and structures that are solid and uniform, like the uterus, ovaries, or prostate gland, or are fluid-filled, like the bladder, show up clearly on a pelvic ultrasound. Bones or air-filled organs, like the intestines, do not show up well on an ultrasound and may keep other organs from being seen clearly.
      Pelvic ultrasound can be done three ways: transabdominal, transrectal, and transvaginal.

      * Transabdominal ultrasound. A small handheld device called a transducer is passed back and forth over the lower belly. A transabdominal ultrasound is commonly done in women to look for large uterine fibroids or other problems.
      * Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is shaped to fit into a woman's vagina. A woman may have both transabdominal and transvaginal ultrasounds to look at the whole pelvic area. A transvaginal ultrasound is done to look for problems with fertility. In rare cases, a hysterosonogram is done to look at the inside of the uterus by filling the uterus with fluid during a transvaginal ultrasound. Sometimes, a small sample of tissue (biopsy) may be taken with small tools inserted through the vagina during a transvaginal ultrasound. See ultrasound images of ovarian cysts.

  35. QUESTION:
    Is having sex harmful in case of cervix problems?
    Will sex magnify the problems if one has inflammation and cysts in cervix... I don't really know the medical terms.Anyone with accurate medical knowledge or personal knowledge, please help..

    Report Details: Normal ovaries and uterus. Significant free fluid in sul de sac. Cysts in cervix.

    • ANSWER:
      The presence of free fluid is a frequent normal physiologic finding in women. However, free fluid is also associated with both ruptured (more commonly) and unruptured ectopic pregnancies. In addition, the likelihood of rupture increases with the increase in quantity of free fluid. Since clotted blood in the pelvic cul-de-sac after tubal rupture can sometimes obscure the ultrasound image, a brief scan through the hepatorenal space can often lead to quick identification of active hemorrhage. In the first trimester, the presence of free fluid in the hepatorenal space of a patient without an intrauterine pregnancy is virtually diagnostic of a ruptured ectopic pregnancy.

      Cervical cysts, sometimes referred to as nabothian cysts, are small bumps that are found on the surface of the cervix, which is a 2-centimeter long area located at the bottom of the uterus. Like ovarian cysts, cervical cysts are usually not harmful or cancerous and do not present symptoms or require any treatment.

      Most cervical cysts are discovered during routine pelvic exams or gynecological exams, so getting these regular checkups is very important.

      Depending on their size, most cervical cysts do not interfere with sex, conception or pregnancy, but some larger cervical cysts may pose a problem in this area and may need to be removed.

  36. QUESTION:
    Does a transvaginal ultrasound show if your cysts have fluid in them, or are solid masses?
    I had a transvaginal ultrasound because of irregular bleeding between my period, pain in my abdomen, nausea, fever, and my dr. found five cysts on my right ovary. I got to see the ultrasound, and I want to know if by looking at the cysts on the ultrasound, can the dr. tell if they are fluid filled, or solid masses, or if they have both? I didn't think to ask at the time, but I'm waiting on my CA 125 test to come back and now was wondering about the ultrasound images I was shown.

    • ANSWER:
      yes the dr. can tell. they can see all of that in the ultrasound.

  37. QUESTION:
    HELP ME ..can u please help me understand my ULTRASOUND results.?
    Multiple transabdominal and transvaginal sonographic images of the pelvis were obtained.

    The uterus is anteverted measuring 7.9 x 4.7 x 3.3 cm. No focal myometrial mass identified. The endometrium measures 11 mm without evidence of endometrial fluid collection.

    The right ovary measures 3.6 x 2.7 x 2.4 cm. The left ovary measures 4 x 3.7 x 2.2 cm. There is an approximately 1.8 x 1.5 x 1 cm somewhat rounded isoechoic region left ovary demonstrating peripheral hypervascularity on color Doppler imaging which may relate to hemorrhagic corpus luteum.

    Otherwise, no adnexal mass demonstrated.

    There is a small amount of simple appearing free fluid in the cul-de-sac and right adnexal region.

    • ANSWER:
      This ultrasound indicates that everything is largely normal except for a small, possibly a cyst on your left ovary.

  38. QUESTION:
    Causes for enlarged uterus and ovaries?
    Hello, this is the first time I have ever posted a question online about my health. At the beginning of the year I found a lump on my right breast. I went for a mammogram and was sent to have an ultrasound. That all came back clear. While at the doctor, the nurse practitioner asked when my last pelvic exam was. I was sad to say it had been about 3 years. Moving on....

    I schedule my pelvic exam, and while talking to her she asks the normal questions. Are your periods regular, etc? Realizing then, I have had irregular periods the past few months and stomach aches. For about the past year I have had trouble sitting on hard surfaces and standing for long periods of time. The only way I know to describe it is that it feels like I am in the last weeks of pregnancy and my baby is crowning. But I am not pregnant! My bones down there feel like they are being pulled apart and I have sharp needle pains occasionally. With all of this, the nurse practitioner decided to do a pelvic ultrasound. When I went for that, I saw mass on my right ovary. She pulled me into another room and said that I had a complex mass on my right ovary and my uterus was a little large. She suggested birth control for 6 months and a re-evaluation. She also gave me the option to speaking with my gyno at the same office. I decided to do that. A few weeks later I met with my doctor and he seemed more concerned then the nurse practitioner did. He said that the mass was inside my ovary and the nurse said it was on the outside. She also said it was just under 4 and he described it as 6. Which, I am sure it could have grown. He seemed really concerned about the uterus. He mentioned it was scaled on a size 12, and with my body size should be about a size 5, no larger then 7. Because of my symptoms and extensive history of colon and breast cancer in my family, he wanted to do a laparoscopy. So a month later, and pains even more severe, I had that done yesterday. He said he was going to biopsy the uterus and the ovary and look around to see if he could find anything. He mentioned during my first meeting with him, that it was most likely endometriosis. After the surgery, he talked to my husband first and then me. He said the ovaries are swollen and the uterus is still large, but there is no sign of endometriosis, fibriods, or poly-cystic ovarian syndrome. So what could be causing everything? I go next week to go over the images he took and the biobsy results. I am hoping not cancer, especially because he does not seemed concerned yet. I was hoping someone on here could maybe share their outcome of a similar story!

    • ANSWER:
      Hmm. I'd be worried too. I'm sorry, I wish I could say something comforting, but the situation is a bit worrisome. The same genetic mutations that cause a genetic risk for breast cancer also cause a genetic risk for ovarian cancer. Which doesn't mean that that's what's wrong--most ovarian masses are not cancer. But it's especially weird they described what you have as a "mass". ovarian cysts (fluid filled sacs) are very very common and almost never dangerous. Masses are much more suspicious, especially if there is a history of ovarian cancer. Listen to me closely: you need to see a gynecologic-oncologist. This is a specialist in ovarian cancer. Again, I'm not saying you have ovarian cancer. What I'm saying is that if the water heater in your house is making strange noises, you have to get it checked out, and the person to check it out is not a carpenter, but rather a water-heater specialist! A gynecologist is not an ovarian cancer specialist! You might think he is because it's the same body part. But he's not! He might see ONE case of ovarian cancer in his entire career! So that's why you need to see a gyn-onc. They are the specialist. They are the ones who will best be able to diagnose you, operate on you, and treat you. And also best able to look at you and say that no, you don't have ovarian cancer, you're fine, go home, and be right in saying that. They have a MUCH better survival record than regular gynecologists. Get a referral. Or make an appointment if you don't need a referral. Do it now. Bring your biopsy results.

  39. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst Please help me to understand my trans vaginal ultrasound report..?
    Hi..
    I have been feeling horrible and hoping someone can help me to understand my trans vaginal ultrasound report..
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Finding:
    The uterus measures 7.4*4.8*4.1 cm endometrial thickness is 1.4 cm .It is heterogeneous.

    There is a heterogeneous right andnexal mass which abuts the uterus .There are regions which appear cystic and regions which appear solid or complex cystic .Normal ovarian tissue cannot be identified.

    The left ovary measures 5.5*4.6*3.3 cm .It is unclear how much of this represents normal ovarian tissue. and how much may be a mass similar to the right side.additionally there is 2.5*2.1*1.9 cm anechoic mass represent this is included the overall measurement of 5.5* 4.6 * 3.3 cm
    no free fluid.

    Complex Duplex doppler:
    In addition to gray scale imaging,spectral doppler and color doppler images were obtained Arterrial and venus flow was documented to both the left and right adnexal masses
    Impression:
    Bilateral adnexal masses,right greater than left.These are not simple cysts.Differential possibilities include complex cyst or endometriomas ,dermoids and other ovarian neoplasms.In the appropriate clinical setting, pelvic inflammatory disease could have this appearance . Pelvic Mri is recommended for further evaluation.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I know completed/complex cyst isnt a good thing but what about Arterrial and venus flow .Pls let me know ,my uterus is in normal size or not and why the endometrial thickness is indicate heterogeneous. is this abnormal.And which one is my right overy measurment.
    Im 25year old .I dont have any pain or any symptoms, and i have regular menstrual cycle.I did this ultra sound scanning on my 13 the day.

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    Cancer Question?
    My mother came back from a medical exam and said they found a "sis" ? I think that's what they said it was. I most likely butchered the way "sis" is spelled, but what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

  41. QUESTION:
    Pelvic ultrasound please help!?
    Uterus was normal in size and contour. It measured 7.4x4.0x3.78cm. The endometrial thickness was 0.85cm. The myometrial was uniform. The right and left ovary are normal in size and contains multiple follicular cysts. There is a 2.2 x 2.2 cm cyst in right ovary. (which i've had since 2010 now i'm in the army and the medical care isn't great) Right ovary measures 2.6x2.5x2.5 cm and left ovary measures 3.38x1.7x1.5cm. both ovaries demonstrated normal perfusion on color doppler imaging. Small to free fluid noted in posterior cul-de-sac. no adnexal mass noted.

    This is the medical findings report minus the words in ( ) those are mine.
    I mainly don't know what the follicular cysts mean, I just what to basically rule out endometrisis. Even though I've looked up the symptoms and I seem to almost match them to a "T"
    So would this make fertility/trying to conceive a challenge for me?

    • ANSWER:
      A follicular cyst can form when ovulation doesn't occur, and a follicle doesn't rupture or release its egg but instead grows until it becomes a cyst, or when a mature follicle involutes (collapses on itself). It usually forms during ovulation, and can grow to about 6cm (2.3 inches) in diameter. It is the most common type of ovarian cyst

  42. QUESTION:
    wierd lump on my finger...?
    Hi everybody. I have this strange lump about the size of a small pea on my right index finger at the bottom, and on the inside, so it rubs against my middle finger. It is hard, doesn't move around and doesn't hurt when I touch it. the skin around it seems normal. But, it does seem to slowly be getting bigger. It's been there about 8 weeks. I don't think it warrants a trip to the doctor, but what the heck is it? Anybody know?

    • ANSWER:
      What you may have is a cyst.

      A cyst is a closed sac- or bladder-like structure and
      usually contains a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance. Normally felt as a lump under the skin.

      Cysts are common and can occur anywhere in the body in persons of any age.

      What is the treatment for a cyst?

      http://www.medicinenet.com/cysts/page2.htm

      The treatment for a cyst depends upon the cause of the cyst along with its location. Cysts that are very large and result in symptoms due to their size may be surgically removed. Sometimes the fluid contained within a cyst can be drained, or aspirated, by inserting a needle or catheter into the cyst cavity, resulting in collapse of the cyst. Radiologic imaging may be used for guidance in draining (aspirating) cyst contents if the cyst is not easily accessible.

      If there is any suspicion that a cyst is cancerous, the cyst is generally removed by surgery, or a biopsy is taken of the cyst wall (capsule) to rule out malignancy. In certain cases, aspirated fluid from a cyst is examined under a microscope to determine if cancer cells are present in the cyst.

      If a cyst arises as part of a chronic medical condition (for example, in polycystic ovary syndrome or fibrocystic breast disease), treatment is generally directed at the underlying medical condition.

  43. QUESTION:
    what is the meaning of "follicle ruptured", in case of a female?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Hope this helps you with what you are looking for. I suffered from polysystic ovaries for years and it is NOT fun.
      Blessings to you.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does an ultrasound always show something?
    I recently had an ultrasound to detect an ovarian cyst. The scan did not show up anything, but my doctor said the woman may not have gone round far enough. Is it possible that a scan doe's not always show everything anyway?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes,

      It is possible it was not done correctly. Enough places checked, enough liquid. It can still be too early to see anything. You should go back within 3 weeks or go somewhere else just to be sure.

      Read:
      Endovaginal ultrasound: This type of imaging test is a special form of ultrasound developed to examine the pelvic organs and is the best test for diagnosing an ovarian cyst. A cyst can be diagnosed based on its appearance on the ultrasound.

      An endovaginal ultrasound is a painless procedure that resembles a pelvic exam. A thin, covered wand or probe is placed into the vagina, and the examiner directs the probe toward the uterus and ovaries.

      This type of ultrasound produces a better image than a scan through the abdominal wall can because the probe can be positioned closer to the ovaries.

      Using an endovaginal ultrasound, the internal cystic structure may be categorized as simple (just fluid filled), complex (with areas of fluid mixed with solid material), or completely solid (with no obvious fluid).

  45. QUESTION:
    Help me i need answers?
    ok so im 16 and i was diagnosed with polysystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) can someone explain this to me.

    • ANSWER:
      OK, if you really want to know, this is what I was told when I was diagnosed. It is very long, but may help.

      What is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), also known by the name Stein-Leventhal syndrome, is a hormonal problem that causes women to have a variety of symptoms.

      What are the symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      The symptoms of PCOS include:

      Irregular or no menstrual periods
      Acne
      Obesity, and
      Excess hair growth
      Other signs and symptoms of PCOS include:

      weight gain,
      acne,
      oily skin,
      dandruff,
      infertility,
      skin discolorations,
      high cholesterol levels,
      elevated blood pressure, and
      abnormal hair growth and distribution.
      Any of the above symptoms and signs may be absent in PCOS, with the exception of irregular or no menstrual periods. All women with PCOS will have irregular or no menstrual periods. Women who have PCOS do not regularly ovulate; that is, they do not release an egg every month. This is why they do not have regular periods.

      What causes polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      No one is quite sure what causes PCOS. Although women with PCOS often have a mother or sister with the condition, there is not enough scientific evidence to prove that the condition may be inherited. The ovaries of women with PCOS frequently contain a number of small cysts, hence the name poly (many) cystic ovarian syndrome. A similar number of cysts may occur in women without PCOS. Therefore, the cysts themselves do not seem to be the cause of the problem. A malfunction of the body's blood sugar control system (insulin system) is frequent in women with PCOS, and researchers believe that these abnormalities may be related to the development of PCOS. It is known that the ovaries of women with PCOS produce excess amounts of male hormone known as androgen. This excessive production of male hormones may be a result of the abnormalities in insulin production.

      How is PCOS diagnosed?

      The diagnosis of PCOS is generally made on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms as discussed above. The doctor will want to exclude other illnesses that have similar features, such as low thyroid hormone blood levels (hypothyroidism) or elevated levels of a milk-producing hormone (prolactin). Also, tumors of the ovary or adrenal glands can produce elevated male hormone (androgen) blood levels that cause acne or excess hair growth, mimicking symptoms of PCOS.

      Other laboratory tests can be helpful in making the diagnosis of PCOS. Serum levels of male hormones (DHEA and testosterone) may be elevated. However, levels of testosterone that are highly elevated are not unusual with PCOS and call for additional evaluation. Additionally, levels of a hormone released by the brain (LH) are elevated.

      Cysts are fluid-filled sacs. The cysts in the ovaries can be identified with imaging technology. (However, as noted above, women without PCOS can have many cysts as well.) Ultrasound, which passes sound waves through the body to create a picture of the kidneys, is used most often. Ultrasound imaging employs no injected dyes or radiation and is safe for all patients including pregnant women. It can also detect cysts in the kidneys of a fetus. Because women without PCOS can have ovarian cysts, and because ovarian cysts are not part of the definition of PCOS, ultrasound is not routinely ordered to diagnose PCOS. The diagnosis is usually a clinical one based on the patient's history, physical examination, and laboratory testing.

      More powerful and expensive imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also can detect cysts, but they are generally reserved for situations where other conditions, such as ovarian or adrenal gland tumors are suspected. CT scans require x-rays and sometimes injected dyes, which can be associated with some degree of complications in certain patients.

      What conditions can be associated with PCOS?

      Women with PCOS are at a higher risk for a number of illnesses, including high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer of the uterus (endometrial cancer). Much of this risk can be reversed by exercise and weight loss. Additionally, it is important for women with PCOS to have regular periods. If a woman does not have regular periods, her risk of cancer of the uterus (endometrial cancer) is increased. Medication is generally prescribed to induce regular periods. Obesity is a complication of PCOS. Reducing the medical risks from PCOS-associated obesity requires hard work on the part of the woman with PCOS and is often frustrating. For more information about obesity and management, please read the Obesity article.

      What treatments are available for PCOS?

      Treatment of PCOS depends partially on the woman's stage of life. For younger women who desire birth control, the birth control pill, especially those with low "androgenic" (male hormone-like) side effects can cau

  46. QUESTION:
    What does PCOS stand for?

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

      What is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), also known by the name Stein-Leventhal syndrome, is a hormonal problem that causes women to have a variety of symptoms.

      What are the symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      The symptoms of PCOS include:

      1. Irregular or no menstrual periods

      2. Acne

      3. Obesity, and

      4. Excess hair growth

      Other signs and symptoms of PCOS include:

      * weight gain,

      * acne,

      * oily skin,

      * dandruff,

      * infertility,

      * skin discolorations,

      * high cholesterol levels,

      * elevated blood pressure, and

      * abnormal hair growth and distribution.

      Any of the above symptoms and signs may be absent in PCOS, with the exception of irregular or no menstrual periods. All women with PCOS will have irregular or no menstrual periods. Women who have PCOS do not regularly ovulate; that is, they do not release an egg every month. This is why they do not have regular periods.

      What causes polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      No one is quite sure what causes PCOS. Although women with PCOS often have a mother or sister with the condition, there is not enough scientific evidence to prove that the condition may be inherited. The ovaries of women with PCOS frequently contain a number of small cysts, hence the name poly (many) cystic ovarian syndrome. A similar number of cysts may occur in women without PCOS. Therefore, the cysts themselves do not seem to be the cause of the problem. A malfunction of the body's blood sugar control system (insulin system) is frequent in women with PCOS, and researchers believe that these abnormalities may be related to the development of PCOS. It is known that the ovaries of women with PCOS produce excess amounts of male hormone known as androgen. This excessive production of male hormones may be a result of the abnormalities in insulin production.

      How is PCOS diagnosed?

      The diagnosis of PCOS is generally made on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms as discussed above. The doctor will want to exclude other illnesses that have similar features, such as low thyroid hormone blood levels (hypothyroidism) or elevated levels of a milk-producing hormone (prolactin). Also, tumors of the ovary or adrenal glands can produce elevated male hormone (androgen) blood levels that cause acne or excess hair growth, mimicking symptoms of PCOS.

      Other laboratory tests can be helpful in making the diagnosis of PCOS. Serum levels of male hormones (DHEA and testosterone) may be elevated. However, levels of testosterone that are highly elevated are not unusual with PCOS and call for additional evaluation. Additionally, levels of a hormone released by the brain (LH) are elevated.

      Cysts are fluid-filled sacs. The cysts in the ovaries can be identified with imaging technology. (However, as noted above, women without PCOS can have many cysts as well.) Ultrasound, which passes sound waves through the body to create a picture of the kidneys, is used most often. Ultrasound imaging employs no injected dyes or radiation and is safe for all patients including pregnant women. It can also detect cysts in the kidneys of a fetus. Because women without PCOS can have ovarian cysts, and because ovarian cysts are not part of the definition of PCOS, ultrasound is not routinely ordered to diagnose PCOS. The diagnosis is usually a clinical one based on the patient's history, physical examination, and laboratory testing.

      More powerful and expensive imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also can detect cysts, but they are generally reserved for situations where other conditions, such as ovarian or adrenal gland tumors are suspected. CT scans require x-rays and sometimes injected dyes, which can be associated with some degree of complications in certain patients.

      What conditions can be associated with PCOS?

      Women with PCOS are at a higher risk for a number of illnesses, including high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer of the uterus (endometrial cancer). Much of this risk can be reversed by exercise and weight loss. Additionally, it is important for women with PCOS to have regular periods. If a woman does not have regular periods, her risk of cancer of the uterus (endometrial cancer) is increased. Medication is generally prescribed to induce regular periods. Obesity is a complication of PCOS. Reducing the medical risks from PCOS-associated obesity requires hard work on the part of the woman with PCOS and is often frustrating. For more information about obesity and management, please read the Obesity article.

      What treatments are available for PCOS?

      Treatment of PCOS depends partially on the woman's stage of life. For younger women who desire birth control, the birth control pill, especially those with low "androgenic" (male hormone-like) side effects can

  47. QUESTION:
    low libido, weight gain, food cravings, acne, irregular periods facial hair?
    i have all of the above plus moodiness, pain during sex sometimes, sharp pains during ovulation, extreme fatigue and my doctor told me it could be post partum depression that just turned on late, or depression and put me on zoloft. i have stopped taking the zoloft because the only thing it tends to be doing is making me clench my jaw more. now i am not one to make a big deal out of nothing, but does anyone have any idea what else could be going on with me and should i push for more tests? i did ask my thyroid level to be tested and it came out normal. any suggestions?... i am 21 years old, and i had my daughter 16 months ago
    thank you for your answers, but as i did point out, i asked my thyroid levels to be checked and they all came out normal

    • ANSWER:
      It maybe Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

      What are the symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      The symptoms of PCOS include:

      Irregular or no menstrual periods
      Acne
      Obesity, and
      Excess hair growth on face or other parts of your body, called hirsutism (her-suit-is-em)

      Other signs and symptoms of PCOS include:

      weight gain,
      oily skin,
      patches of dark skin on the back of your neck and other areas, called acanthosis nigricans (a-can-tho-sis ni-gri-cans)

      What causes polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

      No one is quite sure what causes PCOS. Although women with PCOS often have a mother or sister with the condition, there is not enough scientific evidence to prove that the condition may be inherited. The ovaries of women with PCOS frequently contain a number of small cysts, hence the name poly (many) cystic ovarian syndrome. A similar number of cysts may occur in women without PCOS. Therefore, the cysts themselves do not seem to be the cause of the problem. A malfunction of the body's blood sugar control system (insulin system) is frequent in women with PCOS, and researchers believe that these abnormalities may be related to the development of PCOS. It is known that the ovaries of women with PCOS produce excess amounts of male hormone known as androgen. This excessive production of male hormones may be a result of the abnormalities in insulin production

      How is polycystic ovarian syndrome diagnosed?

      The diagnosis of PCOS is generally made on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms as discussed above. The doctor will want to exclude other illnesses that have similar features, such as low thyroid hormone blood levels (hypothyroidism) or elevated levels of a milk producing hormone (prolactin). Also, tumors of the ovary or adrenal glands can produce elevated male hormone (androgen) blood levels that cause acne or excess hair growth, mimicking symptoms of PCOS.

      Other laboratory tests can be helpful in making the diagnosis of PCOS. Serum levels of male hormones (DHEA and testosterone) may be elevated. However, levels of testosterone that are highly elevated are not unusual with PCOS and call for additional evaluation. Additionally, levels of a hormone released by the brain (LH) are elevated.

      Cysts are fluid filled sacs. The cysts in the ovaries can be identified with imaging technology. (However, as noted above, women without PCOS can have many cysts as well.) Ultrasound, which passes sound waves through the body to create a picture of the kidneys, is used most often. Ultrasound imaging employs no injected dyes or radiation and is safe for all patients including pregnant women. It can also detect cysts in the kidneys of a fetus. Because women without PCOS can have ovarian cysts, and because ovarian cysts are not part of the definition of PCOS, ultrasound is not routinely ordered to diagnose PCOS. The diagnosis is usually a clinical one based on the patient's history, physical examination, and laboratory testing.

      More powerful and expensive imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also can detect cysts, but they are generally reserved for situations where other conditions, such as ovarian or adrenal gland tumors are suspected. CT scans require x rays and sometimes injected dyes, which can be associated with some degree of complications in certain patients.

      I would suggest talking to your Dr. about this. It can result in Infertility & since you have just had a baby 16 months ago, possibly a hormonal imbalance post pregnancy has caused it. I would also suggest getting a Thyroid antibody titer blood test to look for Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. I have this & it is an autoimmune condition in which your body turns on itself and starts attacking the good thyroid cells, thus, putting you into a state of Hypothyroid but, it won't show up without the antibody test. You are way too young to be having these symptoms, if your Dr. isn't helpful you might try an Endocrinologist. They are really great when searching for hormone related problems or autoimmune issues. Good luck, hope you get an answer soon.

      EDIT: Ask for the Thyroid Antibody Test. THIS IS DIFFERENT THAN YOUR T3, T4, TSH test. This is an auto-immune anti-body test, it is not done normally in a Thyroid panel unless asked for or suspected as in a hereditary link.

      (I would bet your Dr. didn't do this test, when he did the Thyroid testing)

      Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are autoantibodies that develop in response to thyroid gland inflammation. TPO antibodies, in turn, cause thyroid inflammation to persist. Studies show that TPO antibodies:

      contribute to the development of postpartum thyroiditis
      contribute to autoimmune thyroid disease
      increase the risk of recurrent miscarriages
      are highly associated with postpartum depression
      are highly associated with fertility problems

  48. QUESTION:
    what is wrong with me?!?
    Four days ago, i had this sudden excruciating pain about 30 mins after i woke up around my bladder area,
    and in my rectum. It was more of like a 'cramp' sort of pain. It was so painful that I couldn't walk, and felt pain whenever i moved.

    I went to the hospital and they made me get an image scan,blood test and urine test to check to see if i had a bladder infection, or appendicitis which apparently all turned out fine?
    I'm guessing i had an ovarian cyst? The pain has mostly subdued, but yesterday, I felt EXTREMELY exhausted, to the point where i was going to collapse.
    My whole body ached and i felt feverish.. exactly like how your body feels when you have the flu.. today, i still have extreme body aches, and i find it difficult to breathe too.

    Any ideas ?! I want my body to go back to normal asap i can't afford being ill.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cysts Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment ...
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      Learn about ovarian cysts symptoms like lower abdominal pain, irregular periods, pain during or after sex, nausea, vomiting, or infertility. Causes, diagnosis, and ...
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      Ovarian cysts fact sheet | womenshealth.gov
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      Ovarian cysts fact sheet. What are ovaries? What are ovarian cysts? What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts? How are ovarian cysts found? How are cysts treated?
      Ovarian Cysts and Tumors - Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment of ...
      women.webmd.com/guide/ovarian-cysts Cached
      Learn more from WebMD about ovarian cysts and tumors, including symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
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      An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. Any ovarian follicle that is larger than about two centimeters is termed ...
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      Our weekly general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics. Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs or pockets within or ...
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      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac. In most cases a cyst on the ovary does no harm and goes away by itself. Most women have them sometime during their lives. Cysts are ...
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      An ovarian cyst is a sac filled with fluid that forms on or inside of an ovary.

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  49. QUESTION:
    Hi everyone, I placed this question in the womens section and I will have to ask this question regarding my?
    right ovary. on the 28th of last moth I got an ultrasound and it showed 2 septated ovarian cysts and fluid in the pouch of Doglous, and last Monday I bleed soooooo much when it was not my period I almost hemeraged. No the cysts did not burst becasue I was told I would be in a lot more pain than I was. Now today I had another ultrasound internally and it showed fluid still in my right ovary and the septated cyts have gone and now there is fluid in my pelvis for the first time, and it shoed a simple cysts or a follicle. What the? I cannot understand this. 3 weeks ago it was a sus septated cysts not it has gone and now shows a differnet cyst wtih fluid in my pelivs as well as the ovary. Is it possible that ovarian cancer is hard to detect and that will wlll show free range fluid but things that look like a cysts. I mean to go from a spetated one to a simple one ar possilbe follicle has me confused.What is this? Will I need a biopsy? Is it possible that it is cancerous and the fluid has
    from the ovary to the pelvis?I had a ca125 done about 3 weeks ago and it showed cancer antigen in my body of 21. Will I need an MRI? Please help. I am 38
    from the ovary to the pelvis?I had a ca125 done about 3 weeks ago and it showed cancer antigen in my body of 21. Will I need an MRI? Please help. I am 38

    • ANSWER:
      The normal values for a CA-125 depend on the lab running the test. In general, levels above 35 U/ml are considered abnormal.
      In pre-menopausal women, the test is less reliable as values are often elevated due to a number of non-cancerous causes, and a value above 35 is not necessarily a cause for concern.
      Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by mild obesity, irregular menses or amenorrhea, and signs of androgen excess (hirsutism, acne). Typically, the ovaries contain multiple cysts. Diagnosis is by pregnancy testing, hormone level measurement, and imaging to exclude a virilizing tumor. Treatment is symptomatic.
      Complications of PCOS:-
      * Sterility
      * Obesity-related conditions, like high blood pressure and diabetes
      * Increased the risk of endometrial cancer -- this is because the endometrium (lining of the uterine wall that sheds when you menstruate) can get thicker and thicker (hyperplasia) due to the lack of ovulation
      * Possible increased risk of breast cancer
      Please see the web pages for more details on Cancer Antigen-125 and Polycystic ovary syndrome.

  50. QUESTION:
    Severe abdominal pain, what could it possibly be?
    Okay, so I have a doctor's appointment tomorrow morning (the 5th doctor's appointment in a 3 week span, 3rd gynecologist I've seen). For the past 2-3 months I've been suffering from severe abdominal pain. The pain was so bad, I was rushed via ambulance to the hospital from work and I've had to resign because of it. I've had 2 ultra sounds and a CT. The physician at the ER diagnosed me with Ovarian Cysts and free fluid in the abdomen as a result of the cysts. My gynecologist, however, states that my ovary (I only have one ovary, one was removed 10 years ago due to torsion) does represent that of typical Poly-cystic Ovarian Syndrome (which I was diagnosed with in 2005). The pain is located in the lower right quadrant and appendicitis has been ruled out. The pain is similar to severe menstrual cramps, but honestly it feels as if I'm being stabbed and gutted out. It's excruciating! I'm tired of being passed from doctor to doctor (hence the reason I've seen 3 gynecologists), no body seems to know what's wrong, so they pass me off for another opinion. If both my ovary and appendix look normal in the ultra-sound and CT scan images, what else could be causing the pain? What are the chances of my right ovary torsioning like the left did?

    Thanks for your help. :)
    This question is serious and I really don't appreciate answers such as the first two. The pain is really inhibiting my daily life.

    • ANSWER:
      Wow, that's tough. I lost an ovary to torsion, too. Does the pain you are experiencing now feel at all like the pain of torsion? I don't know what the chance of torsion in your other ovary is. Torsion is common enough that that possibility always does exist. I wonder if it's possible that there's torsion and then it fixes and then has torsion again? Have you had an MRI? A CT scan just doesn't show the ovary very well at all. You really need an expert, one who won't jerk you around like these others. is there a better hospital you could go to, or are these gyns all at big teaching hospitals. if no, then do see a doc at a big teaching hospital. The pain could all be from a cyst. Don't let them operate unless you know they've absolutely agreed to save your ovary.


fluid cyst on ovary image