Are Cyst Cancerous Diseases

Mesothelioma and its partner disease, asbestosis, are not limited to any one person or any one nation. Asbestos and asbestos products have been mined and manufactured, and sought after and sold, in nations around the world. The latent diseases of asbestosis and its cancerous partner, mesothelioma, are slowly developing into a world-wide epidemic.

Mesothelioma and asbestosis diseases have been clearly defined as being attributed to asbestos exposure. Despite these undisputable findings, world production of asbestos has risen from 2.18 million metric tons in 2006 to 2.20 million metric tons in 2007, according to the US Government s 2007 Minerals Handbook. The International World has yet to agree upon and abide by a universal consensus of asbestos safety levels. As some countries ban the use of asbestos, others continue to seek safe exposure levels, and yet others disregard the impending health epidemic. Many smaller nations continue to ignore the perilous diseases of asbestos, while asbestos workers may or may not be aware of their life-risking work environments. Even advanced nations fail to implement protection and procedures to protect workers exposed to asbestos for fear of substantial economic loss.

Even though the European Union banned asbestos in 2005, European companies still have financial interest in companies located in Africa, Canada and South America. Canada has been one of the world s largest asbestos producers, however they only use 29% of what they produce, and aggressive sales efforts are targeted towards Asia, Africa and South America. In Japan, local factory and building inspections failed to identify asbestos in more than half of the buildings inspected. Even with occupational laws in place, India and China fail to protect the majority of their asbestos workers.

The leaders of asbestos production, Russia, China, Kazakhstan, Brazil, Canada, and Zimbabwe, are responsible for 96% of the world s asbestos production. In China, the world s second largest asbestos producer, a significant portion of asbestos workers work without any protection in environments conducive to asbestosis and mesothelioma production. China not only fails to protect its workers from asbestosis and mesothelioma on a mass scale, but their asbestos producing factories are typically located near heavily populated cities. The effects of asbestos exposure and the incidences of asbestosis and mesothelioma are vastly unreported in highly populated areas due to lack of medical records, non-existent laws mandating lengthy medical record-keeping standards, and political interference.

Asbestosis and Mesothelioma are devastating diseases that can affect men, women and children that are exposed to asbestos. It is up to the socially responsible individuals and corporations to continue their advocacy work to protect hard working men and women from the incapacitating diseases of asbestosis and mesothelioma. With the prevalence of asbestos exposure that still exists, there is little doubt that asbestosis and mesothelioma will continue to develop well into the next century. The deadly misfortune of the disease on hardworking individuals can only be eradicated with an end to the demand for asbestos containing products.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is are cysts?????
    i have one in my left boob near my nipple and i am scared and im 13 HELP me plz!
    Plz answer

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      If you have a cyst in your breast, I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation to see what he/she says or recommends. Remember that cysts in young women are rarely a sign of something serious such as cancer and that breast cysts can also come and go just like ovarian cysts.

      Good luck :)

  2. QUESTION:
    Puppy - fluid filled cyst under skin?
    5 week old puppy has large (approx 1/2-3/4") cyst under skin. It moves, it's definitely filled with fluid. This pup has not received vaccines, just a oral wormer last week. Seems very healthy. What could this be?

    • ANSWER:
      Cysts, or tumors, are hollow spaces within tissues and contain either a liquid or a solidified material; the contents may be a natural bodily secretion or an abnormal breakdown product. Some cysts develop within a cancerous lump, but we re only discussing non-cancerous cysts here. Non-cancerous cysts include:

      True cysts, which form in glands as a result of blocked ducts. In animals, a common type of true cyst is the one that forms in sweat glands. Complete removal or destruction of the true cyst lining may be necessary to prevent recurrence.

      Follicular cysts, which are dilated hair follicles containing fluid or dark-colored cheesy material. They re also known as epidermoid cysts and are prone to secondary infections. Dilated pores and blackheads are related to follicular cysts but have wide openings on the surface.

      Sebaceous cysts, which are filled with sebum (skin oil) and develop in and around sebaceous glands associated with hair follicles. These common cysts are also prone to secondary infections.

      Dermoid cysts, which are complex congenital cysts, which means they re present at birth.

      False cysts,which are fluid-filled structures formed by hemorrhage or trauma that leads to tissue death; the fluid within them develops when the dead tissue liquefies.

      What causes cysts in dogs and cats?

      There are numerous causes for cysts to develop in pets:

      Injury
      Blockage of the opening of the hair follicle pore
      Sun damage or follicular inactivity (e.g. Mexican hairless and Chinese crested dogs)
      Treatment with certain drugs including steroids
      A lack of oily secretions in diseases such as sebaceous adenitis
      Inherited predispositions due to breed, such as Schnauzers and Yorkshire terriers
      Thin coats and little body fat
      Multiple and recurrent follicular cysts may develop on the heads of young dogs. Boxers have a predilection for these cysts.
      Dermoid cysts, which occur most frequently in the Rhodesian Ridgeback dog, develop because the skin fails to close properly so the outer epidermal tissue becomes trapped within the deeper tissue
      Hemorrhage, trauma or even an injection reaction

      How are these pet cysts diagnosed?

      For an accurate diagnosis, your vet will recommend a tissue examination under a microscope (called histopathy).

      Your veterinarian will either take a biopsy of the tissue or remove the entire lump and submit the tissue to a specialized laboratory for evaluation by a veterinary pathologist.

      If the sample is the complete lump, the pathologist can assess whether the entire mass was successfully removed.

      Histopathology can also help the pathologist determine the cause of the cyst, predict the behavior of the tumor (prognosis) and rule out other forms of cancer.

      What types of treatment are available?

      The most common treatment for cysts is surgical removal.

      If available, laser treatment is useful for sweat gland cysts.

      Topical treatment, such as a cream, can be used with multiple small follicular cysts.

      Other treatments may be needed to address the primary causes, and sometime if the underlying cause is removed, some cysts will decrease in size or disappear on their own. Cysts due to trauma can resolve in time.

      How can I help my pet?: If your dog or cat has a cysts removed, keep the area clean and protected until it heals.

      By following your veterinarian's guidance, you can help your cat or dog recover from cysts.

      Prevent your pet from rubbing, scratching, licking or biting the cysts so you can help reduce inflammation, infection and bleeding.

      If the cyst becomes ulcerated, you ll need to keep it clean and your pet may require a protective bandage over the area until it heals.

      After surgery, you ll need to keep the incision site clean and dry, and your pet shouldn t be allowed to interfere with the site.

      Call your vet immediately if you see significant swelling, bleeding, or loss of sutures after surgery. If you require additional advice on post-surgical care, please ask.

      How will I know if the cyst has been permanently cured?

      In many cases, excision leads to a complete cure.

      If your pet develops recurrent or multiple cysts, it s necessary to determine the underlying cause through diagnostic investigation. If cysts are genetic (e.g. Mexican hairless dogs), there will always be a tendency to develop further cysts.

  3. QUESTION:
    Found to have cyst in the liver. Please give me an advise on this.?
    I was found to have a cyst in the liver about 4 mm in diameter. Can someone educate me on this? Perhaps site where I can have full information? And please can you please refer me a site where I can get a cure by natural healing.

    • ANSWER:
      Cysts are usually fluid filled sacs. However, they can also have particles inside
      of them and are then known as complex cysts....or they could be cancerous, which is
      rare. Most cysts are benign.
      Usually, they do not do anything about them...but keep an eye on them.
      They don't want to remove the fluid in them because the fluid tends to build
      up fast again....and it may become infected by the procedure. They will
      usually do something if they notice that it continually enlarges because
      the cyst will put pressure on the cells around them and the cells could become
      damaged. If it enlarges too much, they may remove a portion of the cyst wall
      and let it drain. The body will absorb the solution.

      I do not know of any sites that can cure them by natural healing.
      For someone who has alot of cysts in the liver, known as polycystic liver disease...they have a special diet. You can find that here.
      http://www.polycysticliverdisease.com/index.htm

      Hope this information will help you.

  4. QUESTION:
    info on ovarian cysts?

    • ANSWER:
      **What are ovarian cysts?
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac. They can form anywhere in the body. Ovarian cysts (sists) form in or on the ovaries. The most common type of ovarian cyst is a functional cyst.

      Functional cysts often form during the menstrual cycle. The two types are:
      --Follicle cysts. These cysts form when the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. Then the sac keeps growing. This type of cyst most often goes away in 1 to 3 months.
      --Corpus luteum cysts. These cysts form if the sac doesn't dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Then fluid builds up inside. Most of these cysts go away after a few weeks. They can grow to almost 4 inches. They may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. They are rarely cancerous. Some drugs used to cause ovulation, such as Clomid or Serophene , can raise the risk of getting these cysts.

      Other types of ovarian cysts are:
      --Endometriomas (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-muhs). These cysts form in women who have endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss). This problem occurs when tissue that looks and acts like the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterus. The tissue may attach to the ovary and form a growth. These cysts can be painful during sex and during your period.
      --Cystadenomas (siss-tahd-uh-NOH-muhs). These cysts form from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      --Dermoid (DUR-moid) cysts. These cysts contain many types of cells. They may be filled with hair, teeth, and other tissues that become part of the cyst. They can become large and cause pain.
      Polycystic (pol-ee-SISS-tik) ovaries. These cysts are caused when eggs mature within the sacs but are not released. The cycle then repeats. The sacs continue to grow and many cysts form. For more information about polycystic ovaries, refer to our FAQ about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

      **What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many ovarian cysts don't cause symptoms. Others can cause:

      pressure, swelling, or pain in the abdomen
      pelvic pain
      dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      problems passing urine completely
      pain during sex
      weight gain
      pain during your period
      abnormal bleeding
      nausea or vomiting
      breast tenderness
      If you have these symptoms, get help right away:

      pain with fever and vomiting
      sudden, severe abdominal pain
      faintness, dizziness, or weakness
      rapid breathing

      **How are ovarian cysts found?
      Doctors most often find ovarian cysts during routine pelvic exams. The doctor may feel the swelling of a cyst on the ovary. Once a cyst is found, tests are done to help plan treatment. Tests include:

      --An ultrasound. This test uses sound waves to create images of the body. With an ultrasound, the doctor can see the cyst's:
      shape
      size
      location
      mass if it is fluid-filled, solid, or mixed
      --A pregnancy test. This test may be given to rule out pregnancy.
      --Hormone level tests. Hormone levels may be checked to see if there are hormone-related problems.
      --A blood test. This test is done to find out if the cyst may be cancerous. The test measures a substance in the blood called cancer-antigen 125 (CA-125). The amount of CA-125 is higher with ovarian cancer. But some ovarian cancers don't make enough CA-125 to be detected by the test. Some noncancerous diseases also raise CA-125 levels. Those diseases include uterine fibroids (YOO-tur-ihn FEYE-broidz) and endometriosis. Noncancerous causes of higher CA-125 are more common in women younger than 35. Ovarian cancer is very rare in this age group. The CA-125 test is most often given to women who:
      are older than 35
      are at high risk for ovarian cancer
      have a cyst that is partly solid

      **How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. If you have a cyst, you may be told to wait and have a second exam in 1 to 3 months. Your doctor will check to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who:

      are in their childbearing years
      have no symptoms
      have a fluid-filled cyst
      It may be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. Your doctor may want to remove the cyst if you are postmenopausal, or if it:

      doesn't go away after several menstrual cycles
      gets larger
      looks odd on the ultrasound
      causes pain
      The two main surgeries are:

      --Laparoscopy (lap-uh-ROSS-kuh-pee) done if the cyst is small and looks benign (noncancerous) on the ultrasound. While you are under general anesthesia, a very small cut is made above or below your navel. A small instrument that acts like a telescope is put into your abdomen. Then your doctor can remove the cyst.
      --Laparotomy (lap-uh-ROT-uh-mee) done if the cyst is large and may be cancerous. While you are under general anesthesia, larger incisions are made in the stomach to remove the cyst. The cyst is then tested for cancer. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to take out the ovary and other tissues, like

  5. QUESTION:
    Whats a cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      You can't get a cyst from sex, however if you were to have an ovarian cyst, it could cause pain during and after sexual intercourse.

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  6. QUESTION:
    Haemorragic cyst/endometrioma?
    Been told by my doc that I have 36x36x34mm cyst and might be either haemorrhagic cyst/polyp or fibroid pse help I am worried sick

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Hemorrhagic Cyst An ovarian cyst is a sac of fluid or tissue that develops on or inside an ovary. Types of cysts in the ovary may vary in size from pea-sized growths to a cyst as large as a grapefruit.

      Approximately 95 percent of ovarian cysts are harmless and benign. An ovarian cyst can occur in women of any age, but most often affect women during their childbearing years. Some ovarian cysts can rupture, bleed or cause pain. Painful or large ovarian cysts may need to be removed through surgery. A small percentage of ovarian cysts are cancerous, so all types of cysts should be carefully diagnosed.

      Ovarian Hemorrhagic Cyst
      Hemorrhagic cysts are amongst the most common types of cysts. This ovarian cyst is also known as a blood cyst or hematocyst. These occur when a blood vessel in the wall of a cyst breaks, causing blood to flood into the cyst.

      Hemorrhagic cysts are a type of functional cyst, meaning that they occur during the course of the female menstruation process and are affected by the hormones. Functional cysts, also known as simple cysts, have nothing to do with disease. These types of cysts can require no treatment, and usually resolve without the need for surgery.

      Symptoms of Hemorrhagic Cysts
      When women experience symptoms of hemorrhagic cysts, the first sign is usually abdominal pain. Ovarian hemorrhagic cyst pain usually develops on one side of the body. If these types of cysts rupture, it can bleed into the ovary, causing pain and the rapid stretching of the ovarian wall. If this occurs, a sonogram may reveal blood clots that have formed in the ovary. Anemia-related signs and symptoms may be present.

      While a ruptured ovarian hemorrhagic cyst is quite painful, the chance of these types of cysts rupturing is low. Most often, this type of ovarian cyst will regulate itself. In some cases, even hemorrhagic cysts that rupture resolve without the need for surgery. A large hemorrhagic cyst may require surgical removal.

      In order to ease minor pain or other symptoms of hemorrhagic cysts, medical professionals may prescribe:

      Narcotics
      OTC pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
      Prescription pain medications.
      Some other methods of releasing tension and stimulating circulation include using:

      Heating pads
      Hot water bottles
      Ice packs.
      If you have hemorrhagic cysts, or any type of ovarian cyst lasting longer than two or three menstrual cycles, talk to your doctor about treatment options. Women with a family history of ovarian cancer should have ovarian cysts checked carefully for signs of malignancy.

      Ovarian Hemorrhagic Cyst Surgery
      If ovarian cyst surgery becomes necessary, doctors often employ laparoscopy to remove hemorrhagic cysts. A laparoscopy is minimally invasive, often referred to as keyhole surgery or pinhole surgery. During a laparoscopy, a doctor will make very small incisions for hemorrhagic cysts, generally around the belly button area. He'll then insert a thin rod lens and camera system to perform surgery and remove the ovarian cyst.

      Some of the advantages of a laparoscopy ovarian cyst removal are:

      Less blood loss
      Less pain
      Less scarring due to smaller incisions
      Shorter recovery periods.
      Note that a very large ovarian hemorrhagic cyst may require a larger incision, and sometimes, a more traditional surgical method involving a large abdominal incision.

  7. QUESTION:
    fatty cyst like lump?
    on my mother's side of the family (her father's side) all have history of benign fatty cysts. my sister went to the dermatologist for her smaller one and her doctor just gave her cream and said if it gets bigger they can drain it. i know this is a gross subject but i am concerned about my health here. i found one on my back that does not cause pain and it shrinks from being accidentally popped. i told my mother about it and she said her father had a few of them, and both of her grandparents had them as well and they were just drained and harmless. i am embarrassed about it but noticed it was still there today and need to ask a doctor. i'm fearful of it being cancer. but with history of fatty cysts i am a little at ease in the situation. any thoughts? i was at the doctor when it was smaller and they didn't even bring attention to it just told me to use something for some acne on my back so i'm assuming it's okay? i no longer have acne but i still have that bump.

    • ANSWER:
      Fatty cysts are often cancerous nor do they become cancerous. The condition itself is thought to be of genetic origins. Normally the lumps do not cause any pain but there are some conditions under which they can become painful. This is a condition known as adiposis dolorosa or Dercum s disease and no one knows why the fatty cysts become painful. Treatment for this type of pain is accomplished with lidocaine given intravenously or mexiletine, which is taken orally.
      If you are one of the people who has many fatty cysts, you could develop Madelung s Disease. This is when the cysts grow in places where they can upset bodily functions. These places include the heart, lungs, larynx, intestines or esophagus. In these cases, the lumps will most likely be surgically removed.

      Fatty cysts are usually dome-shaped and they grow very slowly, many times over a number of months or years. The lump will feel rubbery or soft and it moves around when you touch it. A cancerous lump grows very fast compared to a fatty cyst and it is not soft, but hard to the touch and is not at all moveable. The majority of lipomas are not painful but cancerous lumps can be painful.

      There is a cancer caused by body fat but the lumps do not appear visibly under the skin like fatty cysts. They are deeper down and most often in the abdomen, groin or thigh. They cannot be felt through the skin but can become painful and cause obstructions. You can have a malignant lump for many years and not know until it is large enough to cause an organ not to function or block a passageway. Unfortunately by this time, there is less success in removing the lump in its entirety and eliminating the cancerous cells because it has gotten overly large and many times moved into other locations, such as the lymph nodes.

      Usually it is easy to tell if you have fatty cysts by the location and feel of the lump. But, it is best not to take it for granted, but to make an appointment with your doctor to have it examined. Your doctor can most often tell just with a physical examination. If there is any question at all as to whether it is malignant, a biopsy will be taken to make a diagnosis.

      Don t worry unnecessarily if you should feel a lump through the skin. It is not immediately cancerous as many people automatically assume. It can be a fatty cyst and you can have many of these over a lifetime. Fatty cysts are not pleasant but they are not life threatening either.

  8. QUESTION:
    WHAT is a Cyst?
    I heard you can get it from sex.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are refering to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      You can't get a cyst from sex, however if you were to have an ovarian cyst, it could cause pain during and after sexual intercourse.

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  9. QUESTION:
    if a complex ovarian cyst ruptures will it destroy your reproductive system?
    and does a complex cyst more than likely indicate cancer?

    please answer both questions!!!
    I was diagnosed with a complex ovarian cyst prior to my laparoscopy,and the surgeon just left it there
    why would he do that??

    ok,so,please answer all 3 parts!!
    but they didnt give me any medicine!!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi.
      The surgeon probably left it there because of the size of the cyst, and possibly the type of cyst.

      I had a large cyst that was to be removed laparscopically, and when he went in to do it, he discovered that it was a dermoid cyst.

      Dermoid cysts are filled with things like hair-gross.

      I had to do a laparotomy, because they did not want to run the risk of it rupturing during laparscopic surgery.

      I was glad for their caution, because as it turned out, the large cyst I had was a mucinous cyst with borderline malignancy.

      Had they done the laparscopic, all those pre-cancerous cells would have been flying through my body.

      As for whether it likely indicates cancer, that can't really be answered until they send it to pathology. Cancer is a weird disease, and different for every person. One person may have a tiny cyst that looks to be a normal, functional cyst. If removed, it may be cancer.

      Another person may have a giant cyst that is nothing at all, but a huge pain.

      Pathology will biopsy the tissue and determine if there was something there.

      And, your other question about the reproductive system, you have two ovaries, and as long as you have one working ovary, you can still get pregnant.

      Good luck.

  10. QUESTION:
    can a cyst be dangerous if not treated in time?
    if a cyst is not taken care of after a period of time, can the cyst be cancerous

    • ANSWER:
      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease or cancer related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that if you think you have an ovarian cyst that you consult with your doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 11 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  11. QUESTION:
    What is a cyst and where can you get them?
    I have heard this word 'cyst' thrown about, but do not understand what it exactly means.

    Are they bad, why do you some women get them, where can you get them, what are they exactly?!

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      You can't get a cyst from sex, however if you were to have an ovarian cyst, it could cause pain during and after sexual intercourse.

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  12. QUESTION:
    what is a cyst i really dont know lol?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to as there are a different number of cysts. A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs.

      A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated. Most cysts form for no apparent reason.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      All unusual lumps need to be investigated. Some cysts are cancerous and early treatment is vital. If left untreated, benign cysts can cause serious complications including:

      * Infection - the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia).

      * Peritonitis - if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.

      * Cancerous cysts - If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      If you think you have a cyst I would recommend that you discuss this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  13. QUESTION:
    Has any one suffered with cysts in there breasts?
    i have 2 small cysts, but the hospital wont remove them, im going back for a 2nd visit to the consultant next week.
    Regards to purple,, could you email me please regarding how you were first diagnosed, only if you dont mind. im really sorry to hear your diagnosis. i just cant understand why the doctors didnt remove my cysts in the first place.

    • ANSWER:
      If you had imaging studies (specifically ultrasound), and the cysts are truely simple cysts and had none of the nine malignant characteristics, that sounds right. We make cysts in all kinds of parts of our bodies (liver, kidney, breast, ovaries to name a few). Cysts are simply fluid filled sacs. They are not cancerous in almost ALL cases. The only time a doctor will remove a cyst is if it is causing you pain or if it doesn't look like a classical cyst on imaging. Cysts come and go. If you remove a cyst, you more than likely will grow more. Aspirating a cyst with a needle is an alternative, but in 50% of the time, the cyst will return. If you are not having pain, generally we leave cysts alone. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

      I am unsure of the specifics of the woman, with breast cancer, who answered ahead of me. I can tell you that simple breast cysts do not become cancer. Someone who has breast cysts can develop breast cancer, but that is unrelated to the cysts. Anyone can get breast cancer, and having breast cysts does not raise your risks.

      Here is some things from the "experts":

      "Benign breast disease is a large group of non-cancerous conditions of the breast that includes cysts, fibroadenomas, and hyperplasia. Of all the types of benign breast disease, only hyperplasia is related to breast cancer."

      http://www.yourdiseaserisk.harvard.edu/hccpquiz.pl?func=show&quiz=breast&page=risk_list

      "Virtually all breast cysts identified as simple cysts by ultrasound are benign and remain so. It is estimated that perhaps 1 in 1,000 cysts may harbor a tumor (not necessarily malignant). These can usually be identified by their ultrasound appearance. Women with cysts are not at greater risk for the development of cancer although this risk may be minimally elevated if there is a positive family history for breast cancer (mother, sister, daughter)."

      http://www.cpmc.org/services/women/breast/breast_cyst.html

  14. QUESTION:
    what is a cyst?
    What causes it? How can one be removed? Does it go away by itself?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends what type of cyst you are referring to, there are many different types of cysts.

      A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs. A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid. The common symptom is localised swelling, but a cyst may or may not be painful. Sometimes, depending on the cause and location, a cyst contains semi-solid or solid material. The typical treatment for any cyst is surgical removal and a routine test for cancer, even though most cysts are benign. All unusual lumps need to be professionally investigated.

      Some of the different types of cysts include:

      * Arachnoid cyst - the arachnoid membrane covers the brain. A baby may be born with an arachnoid cyst. It is caused by the arachnoid membrane doubling up or splitting to form an abnormal pocket of cerebrospinal fluid. This can be treated by surgical drainage if necessary.

      * Bartholin s cyst - the Bartholin glands are situated inside the vagina. A cyst occurs if the ducts become blocked. Treatment includes surgery and antibiotics.

      * Breast cyst - these cysts are usually painful and need to be drained with a needle. There is some evidence that breast cysts might indicate an increased risk of breast cancer.

      * Cystic hygroma - occasionally, a baby is born with a small cyst or bursa. This birth defect can be corrected with surgery.

      * Hydatid disease - a small tapeworm forms cysts in the liver or lungs. The tapeworm eggs are spread by contact with infected dogs, their faeces or anything contaminated with faeces such as soil. Treatment includes surgery and drugs.

      * Ovarian cyst - most are benign, but can grow to such a size that the woman looks pregnant. In some cases, the cysts are cancerous. Treatment includes surgery.

      * Pilonidal disease - a cyst, sometimes containing an ingrown hair, forms in the skin of the lower back. Pilonidal cysts can grow in clusters and sometimes create a hole or cavity in the skin. Treatment includes draining the cyst or surgical removal.

      * Sebaceous cyst - the skin is lubricated by sebaceous fluid. This fluid can build up inside a pore or hair follicle and form a hard lump filled with thick, greasy matter. Treatment includes drugs, draining the cyst with a small needle, or surgical removal. Sebaceous cysts are common on the face, back, scalp and scrotum.

      If a cyst is cancerous, treatment will depend on its size and location and on whether or not cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. The cyst will be surgically removed along with surrounding tissue. Further treatment might include radiotherapy (using x-rays to kill cancer cells) or chemotherapy (drugs).

      I would recommend that if you have a cyst or think you have a cyst that you consult with your doctor for further evaluation and discuss any concerns with them.

      Good luck :)

  15. QUESTION:
    Boyfriend with breast cancer (cysts)?
    My boyfriend has a cyst on his chest (breast cancer).
    He says that it is no big deal, he doesnt have life or health insurance, but is making money to get these insurances.
    I am worried for him, and don't want anything bad to happen.
    We have also had sex, and I dont know if I will have a chance of getting cysts as well.
    Are also planning on having kids together, (promise ring), and am even more worried that the kids will have a chance of getting cysts.

    If anybody could give me answers to my questions, I would be very happy, thank you.
    this is what he has

    cysts in the breast which are part of benign proliferative ("fibrocystic") disease (fibrocystic breast disease)

    • ANSWER:
      Benign means non-cancerous. A cancerous cyst is malignant.
      A cyst is rarely cancerous and it would be very more unusual for a young man to develop breast cancer. Breast cancer rarely occurs in men, although it is possible.
      Please click on these links for a simple explanations of fibrocystic disease, cysts and breast cancer.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/fibrocystic_breast_condition/article.htm
      http://www.breastcancer.org/questions/benign.jsp
      Unless your boyfriend has been examined and diagnosed by a medical doctor, it sounds like he is either pulling your leg for some sort of dramatic effect or is simply unknowledgeable and rather careless about his health. If he got the diagnosis of benign proliferative diease from a doctor, he didn't ask for a thorough explanation of terms he didn't understand.
      If he really thought he had cancer, wouldn't he immediately seek treatment?
      No hospital would let him go without treatment because he has no insurance. A hospital social worker would help him make financial arrangements AFTER examination by a doctor, including application for public medical assistance and hospital grants.
      Any hospital ER will accept anyone, with or without insurance or money, for initial evaluation and treatment. It's the law, for one thing. And a hospital can refer you to a free or income-based clinic in your area for follow-up care.
      Cysts are not contagious. Cancer is not contagious, either.
      A predisposition to getting cysts may run in families, but this is a matter of conjecture. You both should talk to his examining doctor and ask any questions you have.

  16. QUESTION:
    How to treat an ovarian cyst?
    I just found out I have a little ovarian cyst. I've already been in pain for two weeks. I can't take anymore. What's gonna happen?? Supposebly they go away on their own, how long till it goes awayy? Help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      Menstrual irregularities
      Pelvic pain a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      Pressure on your rectum or bladder difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  17. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    I have a doctor appt. next week, bt just wondering if this sounds like one. Very irregular periods, almost certain i am not pregnant, painful sex, bloating, sharp pains and cramping in lower left side of my stomach. just wondering if this sounds like I may have a cyst? thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      I have them also and here is some information that helped me

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.
      What causes ovarian cysts?

      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.
      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.
      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).
      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?

      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

  18. QUESTION:
    What's a cysts ?????????
    How are they formed ? How do they go away?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a closed capsule or sac-like structure, typically filled with liquid, semisolid or gaseous material - very much like a blister.Cysts occur within tissue, and can affect any part of the body. They vary in size from microscopic to the size of some team-sport balls - large cysts can displace internal organs.A cyst is not a normal part of the tissue where it is located. It has a distinct membrane and division on nearby tissue - the outer or capsular portion of a cyst is called the cyst wall. If the sac is filled with pus it is not a cyst, it is an abscess.The English word cyst comes from the Latin word cystis, which came from the Ancient Greek word kystis, meaning "bladder" or "pouch". What causes cysts?Tumors,Genetic conditions ,Infections ,A fault in an organ of a developing embryo ,Chronic inflammatory conditions ,Blockages of ducts in the body which cause a fluid build-up, Impact injury that breaks a vessel ,A parasite, Treatment for a cyst will depend on various factors, including the type of cyst, where it is, its size, and the degree of discomfort it is causing. A very large cyst that causes symptoms can be surgically removed. Sometimes the doctors may decide to drain or aspirate the cyst by inserting a needle or catheter into the cavity. If the cyst is not easily accessible, drainage or aspiration is often done with the help of radiologic imaging so that the doctor can accurately guide the needle/catheter into the target area. Sometimes the aspirated liquid is examined under a microscope to determine whether cancerous cells are present. If doctors suspect the cyst may be cancerous it may be removed surgically, or a biopsy of the capsule (cyst wall) may be ordered. Many cysts arise as a result of a chronic or underlying medical condition, as may be the case with fibrocystic breast disease or polycystic ovary syndrome - in such cases the focus of treatment is on the medical condition.the most common cysts.Acne cyst,Baker's cyst ,Bartholin's cyst,Breast cyst ,Chalazion cyst ,Colloid cyst ,
      Dentigerous cyst,Dermoid cyst ,Epididymal cyst ,Ovarian cyst ,Pancreatic cysts, and much more,Most cysts are benign and are caused by plugged ducts or other natural body outlets for secretions. However, some cysts may be tumors and are formed inside tumours - these can be potentially malignant. Examples include keratocysts and dermoid cysts,Signs and symptoms vary enormously, depending on what type of cyst it is. In most cases the patient becomes aware of an abnormal lump - as is usually the case with cysts of the skin or just below the skin. A cyst in the mammary glands (breasts) may be noticeable when the breasts are examined by touching them - the lump will be palpable. Breast cysts are often painful. Some cysts in the brain can cause headaches, as well as other symptoms. Many internal cysts, such as those in the kidneys or the liver may not have any symptoms and go unnoticed until an imaging scan (MRI scan, CAT scan, ultrasound) detects them. I hope that gave you an idea about the Cysts if you need anymore knowledge will be glad to help you..Good luck best wishes

  19. QUESTION:
    chronic lymphocytic leukemia in adults?
    hi, this is sad to inform you that for first time i heard this dieses name called "CLL". it become a panic time in our family because my mother had this dieses which is techniqally proved by test. please let me know what is CLL? how it affects? is it curable? how much cost need to spend for cure.. please please help me, i know everybody know the valuve of word called "Mother".......
    it will be great help me to find the answer for my questions..

    by wetted eyes..

    • ANSWER:
      Tumors and cysts, cancerous cells form when the lymphatic system is not moving fast enough in a particular area of your body. The body always has cancer cells, except it gets rid of them quick enough so they don't spread. When the lymphatic system is impeded, cancer cells have a chance to proliferate.

      There are plenty ways to get rid of tumors, cancer cells.

      Tumors and cancer are just a sign that your body is unhealthy.
      Cancer cells are just mutated cells, fed on by foreign matter. Foreign matter includes all dairy, cooked meats, wheat, soy, pasta, cooked grains, unsoaked raw grains, cooked eggs, sweets and refined sugars, flour, cooked potatoes. These foreign matters over time form buildups in certain parts of the body, and cause disease and cellular damage in those areas as a result. Mucus is formed when foreign matter is ingested. The body is full of mucus. Especially dairy foods are mucus forming. Dairy foods are the most constipating foods. They impede the lymphatic system, the very system that helps remove wastes from the body, filtering out the kidneys at first, or through the skin.

      The best way to get your body healthy is through detoxification. That includes the removal of waste, mucus, foreign matter, mutated or damaged cells.

      You want to cleanse the blood, the liver, and all the organs and glands in your body. This may take a while to do, and be in no rush to get it over with. In the process, cysts, cancer cells, tumors will go away.

      The best way to cleanse yourself is to stop ingesting foreign matter into your body. Foreign matter feeds cancer and tumor cells. Foreign matter is cooked food. So to stop putting foreign matter into your body, you need to eat only raw, clean foods. These include raw fruits and vegetables, soaked raw nuts and seeds, raw honey, and soaked raw ancient breads and grains(Ezekiel, Spelt, Kamut, Barley, Brown rice). Many people claim that raw animal products like raw milk and raw meat can be apart of a raw food diet, whilst it can, but it is usually not recommended.

      The body in general, requires a high amount of glucose and low amount of fat to function optimally. This is especially true of the cells. All of the bodies cells run off of glucose as its main energy source. Every sugar converts to glucose in the body.

      Possibly, the body can get rid of many toxic matters in as little as three weeks if on a raw food program. But it doesn't stop there, it may take up to 10 to 20 years to fully cleanse the body of all the toxic waste previously put into it.

      It is especially important to ingest water and particular citrus fruits, grapes, berries, and melons in order to have electrical flow to the body. The carbohydrates in the fruits give electrical energy to the body, and are easy to digest. Long term consumption of fruits and vegetables may result in improved brain function, improved liver function, improved skin, less disease, improved digestion, improved energy, etc....

      Whilst ingesting the fruits, particular herbs have the ability to improve functions of glands and organs. Take them with a raw food diet, and you have synergy. Certain herbs are more powerful than others-be wise of that.

      There are many other ways of getting rid of tumors, cysts, cancer in the body. Exercise is one of them. Others are fasting, excretion, getting rid of mucus, sweating, drinking lots of water. However, the fastest way is fasting. There are many ways to fast, including water fasting, juice fasting, fruit fasting, mono fasting. You want to dissolve as much mucus as you can in your body so your pipes have a clear pathway.

      Please enjoy your journey on raw food. Its only the beginning.

  20. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts??????
    I went to the ER in August b/c I was having an early miscarriage. They did an ultrasound to confirm the miscarriage (which was a blighted ovum), and found I had a 21mm cyst on my right ovary (which made sense b/c I was having sharp shooting pains in my right side). They said it was small and functional and not to worry about it since there were no masses. Got my period in normal time and everything was back to normal (no pains). My second cycle post-miscarriage was really weird. When I ovulated it was late and I had severe bloating and cramping the evening I ovulated, then it went away, but for the 2 weeks before my period I had weird symptoms that made me think I was pregnant (breasts got huge, felt sick to my stomach, etc). And when I did get my period I felt a little throbbing on my right side for the 1st day or so. Then it went away. My 3rd post-miscarriage period started last night, and I have felt some little jabs in my right side, but they have gone away this morning. I should mention I've been to my OBGyn twice in the last 4 weeks as well as the ER (there was no pain but I was just worrying myself sick b/c I tend to obsess about this kind of stuff and I wanted to be seen asap) and had 3 pelvic exams and was told everything was completely normal and my ovaries felt totally normal and not to worry. But I can't help worrying... do you think the cyst they found on the ultrasound went away and these are all different cysts? Could I have had these all my life and never known? Some info on me that may help- I'm 29, have an 18-month-old son, weigh 130 pounds. Hubby and I will start trying for #2 in a few weeks so I just want to make sure everything is good to go!
    Thanks everyone- I really already know all the info that is out there on the internet about cysts- I really just want to hear personal stories from other women who have had them- thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most ovarian cysts are functional in nature, and harmless (benign).In the US ovarian cysts are found in nearly all premenopausal women, and in up to 14.8% of postmenopausal women. The incidence of ovarian carcinoma is approximately 15 cases per 100,000 women per year.Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. They occur most often, however, during a woman's childbearing years.
      Some ovarian cysts cause problems, such as bleeding and pain. Surgery may be required to remove those cysts

      Some, called functional cysts, or simple cysts, are part of the normal process of menstruation. They have nothing to do with disease, and can be treated.

      There are also types of other ovarian cysts you caould of been missed diagnoised with functional-more info here-
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_cyst

      Symptoms
      Some or all of the following symptoms may be present, though it is possible not to experience any symptoms:

      Dull aching, or severe, sudden, and sharp pain or discomfort in the lower abdomen (one or both sides), pelvis, vagina, lower back, or thighs; pain may be constant or intermittent -- this is the most common symptom
      Fullness, heaviness, pressure, swelling, or bloating in the abdomen
      Breast tenderness
      Pain during or shortly after beginning or end of menstrual period
      Irregular periods, or abnormal uterine bleeding or spotting
      Change in frequency or ease of urination (such as inability to fully empty the bladder), or difficulty with bowel movements due to pressure on adjacent pelvic anatomy
      Weight gain
      Nausea or vomiting
      Fatigue
      Infertility
      Increased level of hair growth
      Increased facial hair or body hair

      Treatment
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. [citation needed]

      Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:

      pain relievers, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain.NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain.
      a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation.
      chamomile herbal tea (Matricaria recutita) can reduce ovarian cyst pain and soothe tense muscles.
      urinating as soon as the urge presents itself.
      avoiding constipation, which does not cause ovarian cysts but may further increase pelvic discomfort.
      in diet, eliminating caffeine and alcohol, reducing sugars, increasing foods rich in vitamin A and carotenoids (e.g., carrots, tomatoes, and salad greens) and B vitamins (e.g., whole grains).
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
      Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

  21. QUESTION:
    Painful Cysts on Ovaries?
    I get cysts on my ovaries that rupture!! It is one of the most painful feelings other than giving birth. They are fine while taking Birth Control but my hubby and I are planning to stop having kids. He can get a vasectomy but I will still have the cyst on my ovary problem. I do NOT want to take Birth control forever!!! IUDs don't work for me and pills make me crazy! Any suggestions on a solution?

    • ANSWER:
      You may want to see if your doctor can do something to remove the cyst, or you may be able to get your ovaries removed (Which is called an Oophorectomy, or a Bilateral Oophorectomy if you get both removed)

      And I just looked this part up on Wikipedia.com for you:
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      ***** Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:
      pain relievers, including acetaminophen (Tylenol), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain. NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain. a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation
      combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

      For more serious cases where cysts are large and persisting, doctors may suggest surgery. Some surgeries can be performed to successfully remove the cyst(s) without hurting the ovaries, while others may require removal of one or both ovaries.

      Most of the patients that have the ovarian cysts that come into our office don't have much pain, so I haven't witnessed someone getting any of these treatments, but I hope this helps, feel better!

  22. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for Poly Cyst in Overies?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cyst Definition
      An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops near the surface of the ovary. The ovaries are two small organs on each side of a woman's uterus that produce eggs and female hormones. Mostly an ovarian cyst is small and benign (not cancerous). However, the larger ovarian cyst can cause pain and other problems. A woman can develop one or many ovarian cysts.

      Ovarian Cyst Causes
      Structures called follicles normally grow in the ovaries each month. They produce hormones and release an egg during ovulation. In some cases, follicles may become cysts. There are two main types:

      Functional cyst occurs when a normal monthly follicle does not mature properly and the egg is not released. These cysts often go away on their own within one to three menstrual cycles.
      Follicular cyst can occur after an egg is released. These cysts usually go away on their own in a few weeks.

      Most ovarian cysts are functional cysts and only occur during childbearing years. Many other, less common types of benign cysts can also develop from ovarian tissue. For example, women with endometriosis may develop endometriomas. Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue from the uterine lining grows outside the uterus. Endometriomas are cysts that grow from the uterine tissue on an ovary.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome is also associated with cysts. Women with this condition have several small cysts in their ovaries.

      A very small percentage of women have cysts that are caused by cancer.

      Ovarian Cyst Risk Factors
      A risk factor is something that increases your chances of getting a disease or condition. The main risk factor for ovarian cyst is being a woman of childbearing age.

      Ovarian Cyst Symptoms
      Most ovarian cysts do not cause symptoms. When they do, pelvic pain and irregular menstrual bleeding are the two most common symptoms. Pain is usually caused by:

      Direct pressure from the cysts on the ovaries and surrounding structures. This causes chronic pelvic fullness or a dull ache.
      Bleeding from a cyst into and around the ovary. This causes more intense, sharp pain.

      Pain may come and go on a regular basis. Or, it may become more noticeable just before or after a period or during intercourse.

      Other symptoms may include:

      Urinary discomfort associated with bladder pressure or irritation
      Nausea
      Diarrhea

      In rare cases, an ovarian cyst may become twisted and cut off its own blood supply. This can cause severe abdominal pain, vomiting, and fever. This requires immediate medical attention.

      Ovarian Cyst Diagnosis
      The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history, and perform a pelvic exam. This includes feeling the ovaries. ovarian cysts are often found during routine pelvic exams when there are no symptoms.

      If a cyst is suspected or found on physical exam, the doctor may recommend a pelvic ultrasound. This is a test that uses sound waves to create images of the ovaries, from which the doctor can determine the type and size of the cyst, and if treatment is needed.

      Other tests or procedures may be used if a cyst:

      Does not go away after several menstrual cycles
      Gets larger and more painful
      Does not appear to be a simple functional cyst

      Other tests may include:

      Laparoscopy A thin, lighted tube and other small instruments are inserted through several tiny incisions in the abdomen to look at the ovaries directly, drain fluid from a cyst, or take a sample for biopsy.
      Blood test for the protein CA-125 This test is done when a cyst is suspected of being cancerous. CA-125 is sometimes elevated in the case of ovarian cancer.

      Ovarian Cyst Treatment
      Treatment depends on your age, menstrual status, the size and type of the cyst, and your symptoms. The main types of treatment are:

      Wait and See This approach involves waiting a few months to see if the cyst goes away on its own.

      Birth Control Pills If you have a functional cyst, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help make it smaller. If you get ovarian cyst often, birth control pills decrease the chance of new ones forming.

      Laparoscopic Surgery Pelvic laparoscopy may be recommended to remove a cyst if it:

      Grows larger or reaches a size greater than two inches
      Has some solid material in it
      Causes persistent or worsening symptoms
      Lasts longer than two or three menstrual cycles

      If the cyst is not cancerous, often just the cyst can be removed. However, in some cases, your whole ovary may need to be removed. If the cyst is cancerous, you may have your ovary and uterus removed. This requires an open surgical procedure, rather than a laparoscopy.

      Ovarian Cyst Prevention
      Since ovarian cysts are common, and are usually painless and benign, doctors do not routinely recommend any preventive interventions. Women who have recurrent symptomatic cysts may benefit from birth control pills over the long term. The best way to catch cysts early is to:

      Tell your doctor about any changes in your monthly cycles or periods
      Have regular pelvic exams

  23. QUESTION:
    Can an Ovarian Cyst cause cancer and can they go away on there own?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are fluid filled sacs or pockets within or on the surface of an ovary. They typically occur as the result of ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary) and are common in women of childbearing age. Most cysts are normal and shrink over time, usually within one to three months.

      Cysts that develop due to normal ovulation are called functional cysts, because they are not related to disease. Other less common types of ovarian cysts include dermoid cysts, cystadenoma cysts and endometrioma cysts. These abnormal ovarian cysts are usually benign, but they may require treatment.

      Most ovarian cysts are small and do not causes symptoms. When symptoms are present, the most common is pain or a sense of fullness or pressure in the lower abdomen or pelvis. This may be caused by:

      Rupture of the cyst
      Rapid growth of the cyst
      Twisting of the cyst around its blood supply
      Ovarian cysts are usually diagnosed during routine pelvic exams, although ultrasounds are sometimes necessary. Blood tests, pregnancy tests and biopsies may also be performed to rule out other conditions.

      Most cysts are functional cysts and disappear within 60 days without any treatment. Therefore, a physician is likely to monitor a patient over one to three months to determine whether the cyst has changed in size or caused increased symptoms.. A physician may recommend surgery to remove the cyst if the patient is postmenopausal as cysts can increase the risk of ovarian cancer. Surgery may also be recommended if the cyst:

      Does not disappear after several menstrual cycles
      Has gotten larger
      Looks unusual on the ultrasound
      Causes pain
      Women who frequently develop cysts may have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal condition that causes women to have many small cysts in their ovaries. These women, as well as others who frequently develop cysts may be prescribed birth control pills, which prevent ovulation and the formation of cysts. However, not all recurring ovarian cysts indicate this condition and not all women with PCOS develop ovarian cysts. For more information, see Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

      Ovarian cysts cannot be prevented in women who are ovulating. However, most cysts do not cause symptoms, are not cancerous and disappear without treatment. Regular gynecological exams are a good way to help ensure that changes in the ovaries are detected and diagnosed as early as possible.

      i am sure that will answer all ur questions...

      Good luck and take care of urself...

  24. QUESTION:
    im worried!what causes breast cysts ?
    i went to the doctor a few days ago because i have lumps in my breast and they said it seems like is nothing bad is most likely cyst togo back in 2 weeks so i wanna know what causes cysts should i be worried?

    by the way im 17 years old

    • ANSWER:
      Breast cysts may arise due to a variety of reasons, and one of them called fibrocystic breast disease has been identified as the most common cause of breast cysts.

      The physical manifestations of this illness are the formation of fluid filled masses that are encysted in lumps that can be felt through the skin, breast cyst can affect one or both the breast with telltale lumps that are recurrent and can cause pain, the lumps being tender and recurrent, this flare-ups or the appearance of the lumps usually happen around the time of menstruation in this illness.

      The occurrence of breast cyst formation is also linked to the onset of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), which happens somewhere around middle age in all women, the lumps formed have some movement within the breast and are usually painful or tender to the touch, and can bring on soreness and stiffness to the breast. The onset of breast cysts in women is mostly in middle age around and about the ages of thirty and fifty. The medical diagnosis is not breast cancer but at the same time breast cancer in itself cannot and should not be ruled except in the light of professional diagnosis from a competent medical practitioner. Breast cancer can only be completely ruled out in cases where the lumps have movement and are sore, because in the vast majority of cases of breast cancer, it is very unlikely that the lump will be movable and vary in size with the monthly menstrual cycle- most cancerous tissue is often painless, is not motile or is totally immovable and does not show fluctuations in size with the menstrual cycle.

      Discoloration of skin and a difference in the nipple size and shape are other warning signs for breast cancer and professional advice must be taken at the earliest, which might lead to a biopsy and diagnosis and subsequent treatment.

      Changes in hormonal levels and subsequent hormonal fluctuations within the body which usually occur one to two weeks before menstruation can cause glands present in the breast to fill with fluid and increase or decrease in size according to the hormonal level. These chemical changes lead to the formation of a breast cyst, the breast can become uncomfortably swollen and inflamed and this results in varying degrees of pain.

      The underlying causes of breast cyst formation have not been as yet, fully appreciated or understood, though some contributing factors have been identified and singled out. One explanation could be the resulting imbalances in hormonal levels as middle age sets in, this could lead to the sudden increase in milk-producing glands, glands that might not be normally stimulated in a hormonally balanced body, this could in turn produce an enlargement of cells within the breast tissue and there multiplication with resulting scarring in the breast tissue-leading to encystment and the formation of painful breast cyst.

      The medical view is that normally secreted female hormones such as estrogen, progesterone and prolactin could all be responsible for breast lump formation and the trigger for encystment is typically their varying levels within the body, there is a view that especially with regard to the levels of the two main female hormone estrogen and progesterone. An increase in estrogen or fall in progesterone levels is thought to affect breast cyst formation to the greatest extent in comparison to other female hormones, including lactating hormones like prolactin or oxytocin. The rapid increase in the levels of estrogen is very often because of a poor liver function. In cases where the hepatic system or the liver is unable to break down and assimilate the production of excess estrogens in the body quickly, breast cyst formation usually results. Another probable cause of breast cyst formation and one of the contributing factors is a deficiency in one of the essential fatty acid, gammalinolenic acid or (GLA), which is used as a raw material in the formation of a hormone like substance known as prostaglandin in the body. This hormone-like substance or prostaglandin, is also though to play a role in the onset of breast disease, since a dietary supplement consisting of evening primrose oil, which is a very rich source of GLA, is beneficial and often very helpful in the therapeutic process.

      Other compounds such as Methylxanthines, that are found in abundance especially in beverages like coffee and also in black tea, and in some amounts in colas and chocolate, have been shown by research to be linked to the development of breast cysts and the appearance of breast cyst is usually greater in women who have a higher consumption of these substances. There are other reasons for the appearance of breast cyst which includes the lack of iodine in the diet, the lack of this mineral in the body can manifest itself in many easy one of which is to cause symptoms of an under active thyroid, and this under activity of the thyroid is also known to be a cause of breast cyst formation.

      Other physical and ar

  25. QUESTION:
    can kidney cysts become cancerous?
    so im 14 years old, and ain an ultrasond for my gallbladder, my doctor found a cyst in my kidney. i don't know anything more than that, but i'm going back for another ultrasound, and im wondering if the cyst could be dangerous. i've been feeling sick for quite sometime, and i wondered if not being able to sleep, pains in my sides, and just feeling overall sick all the time could be symptoms of a kidney cyst that was overlooked? the ultrasound was months ago, but they never told me about it until now. does anyone know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I have a simple kidney cyst. My urologist told me not to worry about it. : )

      Simple Kidney Cysts
      A cyst is a closed pocket or pouch of tissue that can form anywhere in the body. Cysts can be filled with air or fluid. Cysts that form on the kidneys usually contain fluid. One or more cysts may develop on small tubes in the kidneys. The simple kidney cyst is different from the cysts that develop when a person has polycystic kidney disease, which is a genetic disease. Although its cause is not fully understood, the simple cyst is not an inherited condition. Simple kidney cysts become more common as people age. Nearly 30 percent of people over the age of 70 have at least one simple kidney cyst.

  26. QUESTION:
    Type 1 & 2 Bosniak Renal Cyst follow up?
    Has anyone ever had a Bosniak Type 1 or 2 Renal Cyst Metastasize? The follow up guidelines say that once a significant cyst is discovered, that a repeat CT or MRI should be done in 6 months. Has anyone ever had their classification change?

    • ANSWER:
      What Is the Bosniak Classification?

      Dr. Bosniak has developed a classification system to determine whether a kidney cyst is dangerous and has to be treated, or whether it is a harmless type that needs no further attention. Here is the list of renal cystic disease according to Bosniak:

      Bosniak I: Describes a benign cyst that is filled with water which is no risk to the patient s health, and does not need any treatment.
      Bosniak II: A benign cyst that has very thin septa ( cross walls ) and has slight traces of chalky substance in the septa ( calcification ) or outer walls that holds various types of fluids. Due to the fact that both septa and other substances occur in small amounts, this cyst is only malignant in 5% of cases, and frequent check-ups are usually sufficient enough to prevent any complications.
      Bosniak IIF: This type of cyst is not usually malignant but the thick septa and relatively high amount of calcification may indicate complications and require follow ups . The cyst must be observed to rule out problems or negative developments.
      Bosniak III: Kidney cysts in this category can require a surgical procedure due to the fact that the calcifications are thick and grainy, and the thickness of the septa may be of alarming nature.
      Bosniak IV: A bosniak cyst classified IV is undoubtedly of malignant nature and indicates cancerous developments in the kidney in almost 90% of cases.
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  27. QUESTION:
    treatment for liver cyst?

    • ANSWER:
      A liver cyst can be fluid filled, or Complex (meaning it has something
      other than fluid in it) or sometimes, rarely, cancerous.

      There is no treatment for this. The doctors usually watch the cyst
      (by either ultrasound or Ct scan) to see if it enlarges in size.

      If it enlarges in size, then they may have to go in and remove
      part of the cyst wall or the total cyst itself.
      They cannot just draw the fluid out of it,
      as it can heal up and still grow in size.
      If the cyst enlarges, it can cause damage to the functioning
      liver cells around it. That is why they watch it very closely.

      http://www.surgeryplanet.com/gastroenterology/treatment-for-liver-cyst.html
      http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/gs_liver_disease/gs_liver_cysts_tumors.aspx

      Hope this info is of some help to you. Best wishes

  28. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What are some of the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I have an ovarian cyst. Usually it only bothers me during and before my cycle, and when I move or twist certain ways.

      One burst a couple of months ago, and I experienced severe pain, but once it burst, it felt better (I went to the ER).

      Symptoms can be a pinching or cramping feeling, passing dry blood or "water" when it is not your time of the month.

      Sometimes they will do surgery for them. I don't want surgery because I'm on Coumadin, so I'm holding out as long as I can!

      Some are dangerous, and need medical attention...

      Here's some stuff you might find helpful:

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?

      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?

      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?

      If a woman is in her 40 s, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are functioning ovarian cysts, which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20 s and 30 s, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common functioning ovarian cysts. Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it s just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

  29. QUESTION:
    Control cyst?
    How do one prevent having cyst and how to remedy it?

    • ANSWER:
      Although there's no definite way to prevent the growth of ovarian cysts, regular pelvic examinations are a way to help ensure that changes in your ovaries are diagnosed as early as possible. In addition, be alert to changes in your monthly cycle, including symptoms that may accompany menstruation that aren't typical for you or that persist over more than a few cycles. Be sure to talk with your doctor about any concerns relating to menstruation.
      About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous.

      Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended.

      Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with:

      * pain relievers, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain. NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain.

      * a warm bath, or heating pad, or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries.Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation.

      * chamomile herbal tea (Matricaria recutita) can reduce ovarian cyst pain and soothe tense muscles.

      * urinating as soon as the urge presents itself.

      * avoiding constipation, which does not cause ovarian cysts but may further increase pelvic discomfort.

      * in diet, eliminating caffeine and alcohol, reducing sugars, increasing foods rich in vitamin A and carotenoids (e.g., carrots, tomatoes, and salad greens) and B vitamins (e.g., whole grains).

      * combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the combined oral contraceptive pill -- the hormones in the pills may regulate the menstrual cycle, prevent the formation of follicles that can turn into cysts, and possibly shrink an existing cyst. (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 1999c; Mayo Clinic, 2002e)

      Also, limiting strenuous activity may reduce the risk of cyst rupture or torsion.

      Cysts that persist beyond two or three menstrual cycles, or occur in post-menopausal women, may indicate more serious disease and should be investigated through ultrasonography and laparoscopy, especially in cases where family members have had ovarian cancer. Such cysts may require surgical biopsy. Additionally, a blood test may be taken before surgery to check for elevated CA-125, a tumor marker, which is often found in increased levels in ovarian cancer, although it can also be elevated by other conditions resulting in a large number of false positives.

  30. QUESTION:
    A physician discovered a cancerous tumor in the cartilage of a patient. What type of tumor is this?
    a. myoloma
    b. retroviral
    c. sarcoma
    d. leukemia
    e. cyst

    • ANSWER:
      Your answer is: C.

      Sarcoma is a type of connective tissue cancer.

      See: Soft Tissue Sarcoma
      http://www.mdanderson.org/diseases/softsarcoma/

  31. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cysts and pregnancy?
    My 25 year old daughter has a history of ovarian cysts and had one rupture the other day. What are the risks? She is 6 weeks into her pregnancy.
    Thank you in advance for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian Cyst during Pregnancy
      By:
      Kelly Shanahan

      Question :
      I am 35 and 13 weeks into my second pregnancy. Four weeks ago, I went to the hospital for pain in my lower right quadrant. A sonogram showed a cyst on my right ovary, about 15cm. The doctor has had me in bed since then, and I have had two more sonograms. It hasn't gone down. The doctors seem to think it is fluid-filled and not cancerous. Can cysts really go down on their own? How long should I wait to see if it will go down? Have you heard of any cysts this large during pregnancy, and do they pose a danger to the baby?

      Alberta

      Answer :
      Cysts (fluid-filled structures) can go down on their own, but it is unlikely a 15cm cyst in pregnancy will do so. Cysts are not that uncommon during pregnancy, affecting about 1 in 1,000 pregnant women. The vast majority of ovarian masses found during pregnancy are benign; the incidence of ovarian cancer is 1 in 25,000 births. Ultrasound can be helpful in determining if a mass is benign or malignant, but it cannot do so with 100 percent certainty. If ultrasound shows that the mass is strictly fluid-filled, without septation or thick walls, it is probably benign.
      The problem with large, even benign, cysts during pregnancy is that they may rupture or torse (twist on themselves). Either of these events leads to significant pain for mom and the potential for miscarriage or preterm labor and delivery for the baby. Large (more than 6-8cm) cysts are usually removed surgically if they do not decrease in size spontaneously over the course of a few weeks. In pregnancy, the best time to operate is in the second trimester, ideally around 14-16 weeks. Occasionally, a cyst may be dealt with via laparoscopy, but very large cysts often require a large, open incision.

      A 15 cm cyst is rather big, and the potential for complications like rupture is high. If it has remained for more than two weeks, I suggest you talk to your doctor about your option. Your doctor may have been just watching you for now, until you get out of the first trimester (the first 13 weeks of pregnancy). I have removed several masses this size during pregnancy, and all of my patients went on to deliver normal, healthy babies.

      http://yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/ovarian-cyst-during-pregnancy.html
      and more info
      http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/ovariancysts.htm
      http://womenshealth.about.com/cs/ovariancysts/a/ovariancysts.htm
      http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1699.htm

  32. QUESTION:
    can ovarian cysts cause infertility?
    my doctor just told me that i have ovarian cysts on both of my ovaries. i just wanted to know if they cause infertility

    • ANSWER:
      yes! they sure can. have em checked out..

      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

      How can the physician decide if an ovarian cyst is dangerous?
      If a woman is in her 40's, or younger, and has regular menstrual periods, most ovarian masses are "functioning ovarian cysts," which are not really abnormal. They are related to the process of ovulation that happens with the menstrual cycle. They usually disappear on their own during a future menstrual cycle. Therefore, especially in women in their 20's and 30's, these cysts are watched for a few menstrual cycles to verify that they disappear. Because oral contraceptives work in part by preventing ovulation, physicians will not really expect women who are taking oral contraceptives to have common "functioning ovarian cysts." Thus, women who develop ovarian cysts while taking oral contraceptives may be advised against simple observation; rather, they may receive closer monitoring with pelvic ultrasound or, less commonly, surgical exploration of the ovary.

      Other factors are helpful in evaluating ovarian cysts (besides the woman's age, or whether she is taking oral contraceptives). A cyst that looks like it's just one simple sac of fluid on the ultrasound is more likely to be benign, than a cyst with solid tissue in it. So the ultrasound appearance also plays a role in determining the level of suspicion regarding a serious ovarian growth.

      Ovarian cancer is rare in women younger than age 40. After age 40, an ovarian cyst has a higher chance of being cancerous than before age 40, although most ovarian cysts are benign even after age 40. CA-125 blood testing can be used as a marker of ovarian cancer, but it does not always represent cancer when it is abnormal. , First, many benign conditions in women of childbearing age can cause the CA-125 level to be elevated, so CA-125 is not a specific test, especially in younger women. Pelvic infections, uterine fibroids, pregnancy, benign (hemorrhagic) ovarian cysts, and liver disease are all conditions that may elevate CA-125 in the absence of ovarian cancer. Second, even if the woman has an ovarian cancer, not all ovarian cancers will cause the CA-125 level to be elevated. Furthermore, CA-125 levels can be abnormally high in women with breast, lung, and pancreatic cancer.

      How are ovarian cysts treated?
      Most ovarian cysts in women of childbearing age are follicular cysts (functional cysts) that disappear naturally in 1-3 months. Although they can rupture (usually without ill effects), they rarely cause symptoms. They are benign and have no real medical consequence. They may be diagnosed coincidentally during a pelvic examination in women who do not have any related symptoms. All women have follicular cysts at some point that generally go unnoticed.

      A follicular cyst in a woman of childbearing age is usually observed for a few menstrual cycles because the cysts are common, and ovarian cancer is rare in this age group. Sometimes ovarian cysts in menstruating women contain some blood, called hemorrhagic cysts, which frequently resolve quickly.

      Ultrasound is used to determine the treatment strategy for ovarian cysts because if can help to determine if the cyst is a simple cyst (just fluid with no solid tissue, seen in benign conditions) or compound cyst (with some solid tissue that requires closer monitoring and possibly surgical resection).

      How are ovarian cysts treated? continued...
      In summary, the ideal treatment of ovarian cysts depends on the woman's age, the size (and change of size) of the cyst, and the cyst's appearance on ultrasound.

      Treatment can consist of simple observation, or it can involve evaluating blood tests such as a CA-125 to help determine the potential for cancer (keeping in mind the many limitations of CA-125 testing described above).

      The tumor can be removed either with laparoscopy, or if needed, an open laparotomy (using and incision at the bikini line) if it is causing severe pain, not resolving, or if it is suspicious in any way. Once the cyst is removed, the growth is sent to a pathologist who examines the tissue under a microscope to make the final diagnosis as to the type of cyst present.

      Ovarian Cysts At A Glance
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures.
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons.
      When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one.
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound.
      The treatment of ovarian cysts varies from observation and monitoring to surgical procedures.

      hope that this info helps.

  33. QUESTION:
    cyst on the pancreas? please help.?
    my liver enzymes were elevated, so as a precaution i had an abdominal ultrasound to make sure it was functioning correctly.well, they found during the US that I have a small 2 cm cyst on my pancreas.

    i have to go for a CT scan and bloodwork to make sure its functioning correctly. i am so scared. first off, i have NEVER heard of a pancreatic cyst before. secondly, i did research online and it says they mostly come from a bout of pancreatitis or some other disease i have never heard of, both of which i do NOT have. it says most of them are benign, but it also says they are uncommon.

    i was told its probably nothing and its very small, but i am still very worried as they are uncommon.,

    can anyone help put my mind at ease by sharing their stories or know anything about this? i have to wait until tues. to even have the scan done

    thanks in advance

    im 28 yrs old, female. not diabetic.

    • ANSWER:
      Pancreatic cysts are diagnosed more often now than in the past, not because more people have them, but because today's improved imaging technology has made pancreatic cysts easier to find.

      In fact, many cysts in the pancreas are found during abdominal scans for other problems, such as yours was.

      The good news is that most pancreatic cysts aren't cancerous.

      Your doctor will probably want to take a sample of the fluid in the cyst to determine whether or not it is indeed benign.

      The good news is that most pancreatic cysts aren't technically cysts at all.

      Called pseudocysts, these pockets of digestive fluids aren't lined with the type of cells found in true cysts.

      Instead, a pseudocyst's walls may include cells normally found in other abdominal organs, such as the stomach, intestines and the pancreas itself.

      Pseudocysts are not at all cancerous!

      I don't know if any of this information will help you, since you have already done research on your own, but I wanted you to know that pancreatic cysts are not as uncommon - or rare - as you thought they were.

      I wish you the best and hope that you only have the Pseudocysts!!

      Good Luck! =)

  34. QUESTION:
    what is cyst formation..?

    • ANSWER:
      A Cyst is a abnormal closed epithelium lined cavity (Like a closed sac) containing Fluid or Semisolid material which occurs anywhere in the body organ.
      Cyst is named according to the Organ where it occurs.
      Ovary of Female - Ovarian cyst and Poly cystic Ovarian syndrome
      Corpus Luteum of ovarian follicle - Lutein cyst
      Meibomian Galnd of Eyelid - Meibomian cyst
      Pancreas - Pancreatic Cyst
      Kidney - Renal Cyst
      Sebaceous Gland of Skin - Sebaceous Cyst
      Spermatic cord of Testes - Spermatocele
      Mucous Gland in Buccal (Oral) Mucosa - Mucus Cyst
      Bartholin Gland of Vagina- Bartholin's cyst
      and many more.....

      Treatment is usually Surgery but may vary depending upon the type of cyst.
      -----------------------------------------------------------------
      A cyst may be benign or malignant.
      Benign-Mild,Non Progressive,Harmless (That is NOT cancerous)
      Malignant-Cancer
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      Dermoid cysts occur anywhere in the Brain,Spinal cord,Ovary and Nasal Sinus.
      Hydatid Cyst - is an infection caused by eating food or water that is contaminated with the eggs of the Echinococcus worm (Echinococcus granulosus).It occurs in the Liver, Brain,Bones,Kidney, Lungs,Skeletal muscles and Spleen.
      The disease is found where humans are in close contact with dogs,Sheep,Pig.
      Treated with Albendazole or Mebendazole and Praziquantel.

  35. QUESTION:
    Ovarian Cyst?
    What is the normal size of an ovarian cyst? And how large does it have to be before it is considered abnormal? Also what does it mean if fluid is seen when you have an ultrasound done ?

    • ANSWER:
      Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed. Ovarian cysts have nothing to do with disease. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment.
      A woman may develop 1 or more of them.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst.

  36. QUESTION:
    Overy cyst, any info plz!?
    I have just been at the hospital having my second ultrasound and internal, i had a cyst on my left ovary 6 weeks ago, that has cleared but i have formed one on my right. I had 2 cycles in between these scans.
    The nurse also said my follicles look cramped and big, what does this mean?
    She told me to make an app with my DOC which i have done! She said she doesn't know what they will do in this case and said i should receive a letter shortly.
    What does this mean? Is it normal to have these cysts or is something wrong and what does the follicle comment mean?
    Please help. Im confussed.
    Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      I get cysts often. The dr has never done anything about them. They grow and then dissipate. I have had a few bust and they felt like a very sharp, painful, and quick menstrual cramp. Then I leaked fluid and bled a little. Your body may not react like mine though so..I don't know. They can remove them if they are painful to you or cause other issues but they can just grow back.

      Definition of Ovarian Cysts
      An ovarian cyst is a sac or pouch that develops in or on the ovary. The cysts may contain liquid, or solid material or a combination of both.

      Ovarian cysts are very common, particularly in women between the ages of 30 and 60. They may be single or multiple, and can occur in one or both ovaries. Most are benign (non-cancerous), but approximately 15 percent are malignant (cancerous).

      Description of Ovarian Cysts
      During ovulation (the process during which the egg ripens and is released from the ovary) the ovary produces a hormone to make the follicles (sacs containing immature eggs and fluid) grow and the eggs within it mature.

      Once the egg is ready, the follicle ruptures and the egg is released. Once the egg is released, the follicle changes into a smaller sac called the corpus luteum. Ovarian cysts occur as a result of the follicle not rupturing, the follicle not changing into its smaller size, or doing the rupturing itself.

      There are five (5) common types of ovarian cysts: functional cysts, polycystic ovaries, endometrial cysts, cystadenomas and dermoid cysts.

      Functional Cysts

      There are two types of functional cysts - follicle cyst and corpus luteum cyst. Both of these types of cysts develop as part of the natural function of the ovary.

      Follicle Cyst. This cyst occurs during ovulation when an egg is released into the fallopian tube or when a developing follicle fails to rupture. These cysts grow from 1 inches to 2 inches in diameter, and will usually dissolve within one to three months.

      Corpus Luteum Cyst. This cyst is caused by a malfunction of the corpus luteum. Unless a woman is pregnant, the corpus luteum disintegrates. But in the formation of a corpus luteum cyst, it fills with fluid and remains in the ovary.

      Polycystic Ovaries

      Polycystic ovaries (also known as polycystic ovarian syndrome or disease) is a condition in which the follicles never erupt from the ovaries.

      Under normal circumstances, follicles grow, mature, and rise to the surface of the ovary, where they burst and release an egg to the Fallopian tube, a process controlled by pituitary hormones. The remnants of the burst follicle then begin to produce progesterone, which stimulates the lining of the uterus (endometrium) to grow thicker in case it needs to support a fertilized egg. The effect on the pituitary of an increase in progesterone production is to signal it to stop stimulating the development of eggs.

      In polycystic ovaries, the follicles grow just under the ovaries' surface, and are produced again and again because the pituitary has not been signaled to shut off. Both ovaries become filled with tiny cysts and can become enlarged.

      Endometrial Cysts

      Endometrial cysts (also known as endometriomas or "chocolate cysts" (filled with dark blood)) form as a result of endometriosis. Endometriosis is a disease in which the endometrial tissue normally found in the uterus grows in other areas. After successive menstrual cycles, this misplaced endometrial tissue bleed, gradually forming endometrial cysts. Over time the cysts grow and can become as large as a grapefruit.

      Cystadenomas

      Cystadenomas are known as neoplasms (new growths). Ovarian neoplasms are new and abnormal formations that develop from the ovarian tissue. There are two (2) types of cystadenomas - serous and mucinous.

      Serous cystadenoma is filled with a thin watery fluid and can grow to be between 2 inches to 6 inches in diameter.

      Mucinous cystadenoma is filled with a sticky, thick gelatinous material and can grow to be between 6 inches to 12 inches in diameter. There have been rare cases where the cyst measured 40 inches in diameter and weighed over 100 pounds.

      Dermoid Cysts

      Dermoid cysts are also known as ovarian neoplasms and consist of skin or related tissue such as hair, teeth or bone instead of fluid like the cystadenomas. Dermoid cysts develop from the ovary's germ cells (cells that produce the egg and the beginnings of all human tissues). Dermoid cysts may be present at birth but are not noticed until adulthood. They generally measure between 2 inches to 4 inches in diameter.
      Symptoms of Ovarian Cysts
      Cysts may grow quietly and go unnoticed until they are found on routine examination. However, if they are ruptured (by sexual intercourse, injury or childbirth) and/or become large enough, the following symptoms may occur:

      Intense abdominal pain (symptom in all types of cysts)

      Menstrual changes such as late periods, bleeding between periods or irregular periods (symptom occurring in corpus luteum cysts and polycystic ovaries)

      Heavy menstrual flow (symptom occurring in polycystic ovaries)

      Infertility (symptom occurring in polycystic ovaries and endometrial cysts)

      Internal bleeding (symptom occurring in endometrial cysts)

      Severe menstrual cramps (symptom occurring in endometrial cysts)

      Pain with sexual intercourse (symptom occurring in endometrial cysts)

      Pain during a bowel movement (symptom occurring in endometrial cysts)

      Weight gain (symptom occurring in polycystic ovaries and endometrial cysts)

      If a cyst becomes twisted, the woman may experience spasmodic pain. Sudden or sharp pain may mean a cyst has ruptured. The twisting or rupture of a cyst may increase the likelihood of an infection. If the woman is experiencing abdominal pain, fever, vomiting and symptoms of shock such as cold, clammy skin and rapid breathing, get help immediately.

      Diagnosis of Ovarian Cysts
      The doctor will take a thorough medical history, perform a physical examination, and conduct laboratory and diagnostic tests. During the physical examination the doctor will do a pelvic exam.

      During a pelvic exam the doctor will put an instrument called a speculum into the vagina. This instrument opens the vagina so the doctor can see the vaginal walls and the cervix, and can get samples of vaginal discharge (called a Pap smear).

      The doctor will gently clean the cervix with a cotton swab and then collect a sample of cells from the cervix with a small brush, a tiny spatula, or a cotton swab. This sample is "smeared" on a glass slide and sent to a laboratory for examination under a microscope by an expert.

      Once the speculum is removed, the doctor will do a bimanual exam. This involves inserting two fingers into the vagina and with the other hand pressing on the abdomen. This exam allows the doctor to feel the size and shape of the uterus and ovaries.

      If an ovarian cyst is present, the ovaries feel larger than normal and the exam itself causes the woman discomfort. If the doctor suspects cysts he will recommend additional laboratory and diagnostic tests.

      Laboratory tests include a complete blood count (CBC) to detect infection and internal bleeding, and a pregnancy test to detect uterine pregnancy or ectopic (tubal) pregnancy.

      Diagnostic tests include an ultrasound, and if needed, an x-ray and laparoscopy.

      Ultrasound uses sound echoes to provide a picture of the tissues and organs inside the body. Using this technology the doctor can see where, how big, how many and what the cysts are made of.

      If the cyst is composed of solid materials or a combination of fluid and solid materials, the doctor may recommend an x-ray of the area where the cyst resides. This x-ray can reveal whether the cyst is a benign dermoid cyst or a malignant tumor.

      Doctors will recommend an additional diagnostic test called a laparoscopy if endometriosis is suspected, if the cyst is very large, if the cyst is not fluid-filled, or if the woman is over the age of 40 when the risk of cancer begins to increase.

      Laparoscopy involves the insertion of narrow tube with a fiberoptic light at one end (called a laparoscope) into the lower abdomen through a small incision just below the navel to view the ovaries, and if necessary drain the fluid from the cyst or remove the cyst entirely.

      Treatment of Ovarian Cysts
      Treatment depends on many factors, including the type of cyst, its size, its location, the type of material it contains and the woman's age.

      For functional cysts a "watch and wait" approach is taken. Functional cysts tend to dissolve over time and treatment is not needed. The doctors do, however, require the woman to return after two menstrual cycles to get a pelvic exam and/or ultrasound again.

      If the cyst is still present and growing (over 2 inches) the doctor may recommend a laparoscopy to remove the cyst. If the cyst comes and goes, the doctor may prescribe birth control pills. These pills reduce the hormones that promote growth of cysts and prevent formation of large cysts.

      For polycystic ovaries the treatment varies. A major symptom of polycystic ovaries is infertility, and whether the woman is trying to conceive or not determines the treatment.

      If the woman is trying to conceive and having fertility problems, the doctor will prescribe Clomid which helps stimulate ovulation. If the woman is not trying to conceive and is having infrequent or no periods, the doctor will prescribe Provera. Provera restores normal menstrual flows.

      For endometrial cysts, cystadenomas and dermoid cysts the treatment is to surgically remove the cyst. If the cyst is small enough the doctor can remove it via laparoscopy. If the cyst is over 2 inches in diameter the available procedures are:

      Ovarian cystectomy - removal of cyst
      Partial oophorectomy - removal of the cyst and a portion of the ovary

      Salpingo-oophorectomy -

  37. QUESTION:
    Cysts on babies kidney?
    I am currently 26 weeks pregnant with twins. I just had an ultrasound done earlier today and discovered that one of my twins has cysts growing on one of his kidneys. The Dr. told me that the twins are doing great, they're heart rate and weight are perfect and they're are growing at a normal rate. She didn't give me much information about the whole cysts on my babys kidney but said not to worry, it was nothing to stress over.
    I am wanting to know more information about this cyst kidney disease and asking help from moms who have been through this. I know my Dr told me not to worry but I am very worried and scared for my baby since I've never heard of this before. All I can do now and hope and pray that this will not threaten my babys life.....any info will be very much appreciated please! Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Kidney cysts describe an illness condition that small sac of fluids developing in the kidneys. There are two types of this disease, one is called simple kidney cyst, and the other is complex kidney cyst. Usually, kidney cysts we mentioned refer to simple ones and are often benign. Well, the latter one could possibly be cancerous.

  38. QUESTION:
    Blood test shows increased liver function, ultrasound showed pancreatic and liver cysts, what could this mean?
    I recently had a blood test reveal increase in liver function, so I had an ultrasound which showed liver and pancreatic cysts. I am scheduled for a CT scan next, and I'm wondering what this might mean. I'm age 21 male.

    • ANSWER:
      Cysts are usually fluid filled sacs. However, they may contain particles in them and then are considered to be complex cysts. It is rare, but at times, they can be cancerous. Two different things can happen. If the cysts are in the organ, should they enlarge, they can placed pressure on the surrounding cells of the organ and damage them. The second thing is, if they are in the ducts leading from the liver or pancreas...this can block the flow of bile through these ducts and the bile can back up into the liver and cause cell damage that way.

      Most of the time, the doctors will just watch these cysts to make sure they are not enlarging. They don't like to drain them ..but they would rather go in and remove the entire one wall of the cysts and let the fluid be absorbed into the body. The reason for this, is because just draining the fluid...the fluid will just come back fast.

      The doctor does different blood tests to check the liver:
      1) the liver enzymes will show if there is damage to the liver cells
      [these tests are called ALT, AST, GGT, and Alkaline Phosphatase]
      2) The liver functions tests will show how well the cells of the liver are able to do the functions the liver does to keep the body well
      [these tests are called Bilirubin, INR, Albumin, Pt, Ptt]
      3) The liver viral testing to see if a virus has entered the body and is using the liver cells to replicate itself ...like Hepatitis A_B_C

      It takes observing these blood tests and comparing them to be sure that the cells of the liver are being damaged. The liver cells make the enzymes and when the liver cells become damaged, the enzymes leak out and go higher on the blood tests results.

      Some people inherit cysts. If it is just in the liver...it is known as polycystic liver disease...if in the kidneys, it is known as polycystic kidney disease. You may want to check with your family members and see if anyone had a disease like this.

      Wish I could be of more help...this is all the info I have on this. Best wishes to you.

  39. QUESTION:
    Name some strange diseases?

    I'm doing a health presentation for school so if you can help me choose a disease i would really appreciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      1.)Lymphangiomatosis
      Sunday July 19, 2009
      Lymphangiomatosis is a disease in which many tumors (lymphangiomas) or cysts grow in the lymph system of the body. The tumors are not cancerous but do cause pain and other symptoms.

      2.)Ankylosing Spondylitis:
      Ankylosing spondylitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that typically becomes evident during early to mid adulthood. The disease is characterized by inflammation (arthritis), stiffness, and pain of various joints of the spine and potential loss of spinal mobility

      3.)Abetalipoproteinemia :
      Abetalipoproteinemia is a rare inherited disorder of fat metabolism. Abnormalities in fat metabolism result in malabsorption of dietary fat and various essential vitamins. Affected individuals experience progressive neurological deterioration, muscle weakness, difficulty walking, and blood abnormalities including a condition in which the red blood cells are malformed (acanthocytosis) resulting in low levels of circulating red blood cells (anemia).

      4.)Alexander Disease :
      Alexander disease is named after the physician who first described the condition in 1949 (WS Alexander). It is an extremely rare, progressive, neurological disorder that most often presents during infancy or early childhood, but can also occur as late as the sixth decade of life. Alexander disease has historically been included among the leukodystrophies--diseases of the white matter of the brain. These diseases affect the fatty material (myelin) that forms an insulating wrapping (sheath) around certain nerve fibers (axons)

      5.)Amyloidosis:
      Amyloidosis is a group of disorders caused by abnormal folding of proteins leading to fibril formation in one or more body organs, systems or soft tissues

  40. QUESTION:
    mild polycystic ovarian disease, natural help?
    Was diagnosed at 22yrs, now 26, still get irregular periods, excess hair, some period pain.
    Am quite happy the way im going and do not want children, any suggestions on natural alternatives which may help? Not on any medication and do not want any.

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts can be and should be removed by laser surgery. It is a lot less painful to have this done that to try to persevere with naturopathic remedies. Also I believe that keeping going with ovarian cysts can result in ovarian cancer.

      Please consult your GP and get referred to a gynaecologist who will remove them under general anesthetic. You should be able to go home withing 24 hours.
      http://www2.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcsearch/bhcsearch?start=0&searchtext=ovarian+cysts&SearchTop=Search
      http://worldwidescience.org/topicpages/o/ovarian+cysts.html
      http://www.chacha.com/question/are-cysts-cancerous

      I hope that this information helps.

      Cheers!!!

  41. QUESTION:
    what can an ovary cyst do to you?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in a woman's ovaries. Most cysts are harmless, but some may cause problems such as rupture, bleeding, or pain. Moreover, surgery may be required in certain situations to remove the cyst(s). It is important to understand the function of the ovaries and how these cysts may form.

      Women normally have two ovaries that store and release eggs. Each ovary is about the size of a walnut, and one ovary is located on each side of the uterus. One ovary produces one egg each month, and this process starts a woman's monthly menstrual cycle. The egg is enclosed in a sac called a follicle. An egg grows inside the ovary until estrogen (a hormone), signals the uterus to prepare itself for the egg. In turn, the lining of the uterus begins to thicken and prepare for implantation of a fertilized egg resulting in pregnancy. This cycle occurs each month and usually ends when the egg is not fertilized. All contents of the uterus are then expelled if the egg is not fertilized. This is called a menstrual period.

      In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst. If a follicle fails to rupture and release the egg, the fluid remains and can form a cyst in the ovary. This usually affects one of the ovaries. Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed.

      Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. The vast majority of ovarian cysts are considered functional (physiologic). This means they occur normally and are not part of a disease process. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment. While cysts may be found in ovarian cancer, ovarian cysts typically represent a harmless (benign) condition or a normal process. Ovarian cysts occur most often during a woman's childbearing years.

  42. QUESTION:
    Pregnant with cyst,polycystic ovarian disease, and endrometrious?
    last time i was at the hospital, i had little cysts on my right ovary along with a 2cm cyst. That was about 6-8 months ago, stomach pain went away after that. well i have missed 2 periods and i took a pregnacy test, and all 3 have came back positive. What im afriad is, can this be a hazard to mine or my babys health? I dont want a abortion, but i dont want to be at risk. I have no health insurance so im waiting for medicaid to go through. I also have a tilted uterus, i know i know tons of things wrong with me. well the cyst wasn't cancerous or anything like that the dr said it was a regular cyst women get, my concern is the baby growing and it crushing my stomach where it always hurt, im so nervous!!! i still get lil pains in the right side stomach, nothing like it used to , but i heard thats from endrometrious
    also whats wierd is i got pregnant the first month my husband and I tried, i was told it would be extremly hard w/ all my medical info, im begining to think the hosptial just shoved me out w/ out full proof , i mean it happened so easily, i am reading online its hard to get pregnant with each diff thing i have

    • ANSWER:
      Actually while your pregnant your endrometrious symptoms should improve. Your cyst will be monitored at your checkups and ultrasounds. The main concern is you are at higher risk for miscarriage for your first trimester. The baby isn't crushing your stomach or cyst and cysts come and go so you may not even have it now. I'm sure you will be fine you will just be checked on a little more often then other women. Get your medicaid and you may want to see if you qualify for wic. Then call and make your appointment with a Dr. It is very hard to get pregnant with your problems. I have been trying for 10yrs. with no luck I have the have problems you have, I think you are very fortunate to have gotten pregnant so easily because it usually isn't so easy.

  43. QUESTION:
    What to expect with Ovarian Cyst?
    I just went to a family practice Dr. (not my normal OB/GYN) for what I thought was a bladder infection. Turns out I have an ovarian cyst on my right ovary. I am going in for an unltra-sound on Wednesday. Has anyone ever had a cyst on their ovaries? What should I expect as far as care/treatment? What are the chances it is cancerous? A bit worried about the future and confused as to what to expect, any info you have to offer is greatly appreciated.
    I had an ultra-sound today, the cyst is an inch in diameter and fluid filled. They called it a simple cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had a number of bilateral ovarian cysts (which included functional (simple cysts) and hemorrhagic and endometrioma cysts (complex cysts)) over the past 10 years. I have only needed surgery for 2 of these cysts because they didn't resolve after a few cycles (as they usually do resolve after a few cycles on their own).

      Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8-12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimetres and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that you discuss your options with your doctor/OB/Gyn and ask them to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

      I'm currently using birth control pills to treat and try to prevent my ovarian cysts from recurring, however I have a simple cyst that is 3.2cm at the moment, meaning that the birth control pills does not always help to stop cysts from coming back.

      If you have any other questions, you can email me - the link to my email is in my profile. I hope this helps to answer your question. Good luck :)

  44. QUESTION:
    I have an ovarian cyst!!!!! help?
    K so I was having sex with my boyfriend and I got really sharp pain in my stomach next thing you know i feel like Im about to give birth i go to the ER and they diagnosed me with a ovarian cysts I been having pain still but not as bad .. Do you guys know anything that triggers the pain so i can avoid doing those things ?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You can't depend on symptoms alone to tell you if you have an ovarian cyst. In fact, you'll likely have no symptoms at all. Or if you do, the symptoms may be similar to those of other conditions, such as endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy or ovarian cancer. Even appendicitis and diverticulitis can produce signs and symptoms that mimic a ruptured ovarian cyst.

      Still, it's important to be watchful of any symptoms or changes in your body and to know which symptoms are serious. If you have an ovarian cyst, you may experience one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

      Menstrual irregularities
      Pelvic pain a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
      Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
      Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
      Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
      Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
      Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
      Pressure on your rectum or bladder difficulty emptying your bladder completely
      When to see a doctor
      Seek immediate medical attention if you have:

      Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      Pain accompanied by fever or vomiting
      These signs and symptoms or those of shock, such as cold, clammy skin, rapid breathing, and lightheadedness or weakness indicate an emergency and mean that you need to see a doctor right away.
      Treatment depends on your age, the type and size of your cyst, and your symptoms. Your doctor may suggest:

      Watchful waiting. You can wait and be re-examined in one to three months if you're in your reproductive years, you have no symptoms and an ultrasound shows you have a simple, fluid-filled cyst. Your doctor will likely recommend that you get follow-up pelvic ultrasounds at periodic intervals to see if your cyst has changed in size.

      Watchful waiting, including regular monitoring with ultrasound, is also a common treatment option recommended for postmenopausal women if a cyst is filled with fluid and is less than 2 centimeters in diameter.

      Birth control pills. Your doctor may recommend birth control pills to reduce the chance of new cysts developing in future menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives offer the added benefit of significantly reducing your risk of ovarian cancer the risk decreases the longer you take birth control pills.
      Surgery. Your doctor may suggest removal of a cyst if it is large, doesn't look like a functional cyst, is growing or persists through two or three menstrual cycles. Cysts that cause pain or other symptoms may be removed.

      Some cysts can be removed without removing the ovary in a procedure known as a cystectomy. Your doctor may also suggest removing the affected ovary and leaving the other intact in a procedure known as oophorectomy. Both procedures may allow you to maintain your fertility if you're still in your childbearing years. Leaving at least one ovary intact also has the benefit of maintaining a source of estrogen production.

      If a cystic mass is cancerous, however, your doctor will advise a hysterectomy to remove both ovaries and your uterus. After menopause, the risk of a newly found cystic ovarian mass being cancerous increases. As a result, doctors more commonly recommend surgery when a cystic mass develops on the ovaries after menopause.

  45. QUESTION:
    what causes pelvic cysts in women?
    thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovarian cysts are common and occur in two types: functional and abnormal. Functional cysts are quite normal They may develop as a result of normal functions of an ovary.

      A cyst forms when the follicle of an ovary gets bigger and fills with fluid as it produces an egg.
      A cyst can also occur after an egg has been released from the follicle. If pregnancy does not occur, it usually disintegrates. However, occasionally it swells with fluid or blood and remains on the surface of the ovary as a cyst.

      Abnormal cysts result from abnormal cell growth. Sometimes abnormal cysts are caused by cancer, but 95% of cysts are not cancerous. The most common abnormal cysts are dermoid cysts. These cysts are similar to skin tissue on the outside and are filled with fatty material and sometimes bits of bone, hair, nerve tissue, and cartilage.

      You have a higher risk for getting an ovarian cyst if:

      You have pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
      You have endometriosis.
      You have bulimia.
      You are taking a drug for epilepsy called valproate.

      I hope this helps :)

  46. QUESTION:
    Are cysts in the non-cancerous cysts founf in the brain cancerous?
    My mom's doctor found cysts in the part of the brain that produces spinal fluid. Her doctor had told her they were non-cancerous, but she wants to double check with a neurologist. Is it dangerous to have non-cancerous cysts located in that part of the brain that produces spinal fluid?

    • ANSWER:
      I saw a TV show on cable called "Eaten Alive" where people had parasites...one woman had migraines and they found cysts in her brain from tapeworm larvae. They gave her meds and all but one of them died, then they had to do surgery to cut that one out. Here is the video...not all cysts are tapeworms, though..they didn't say it was Lewy bodies, did they? That would be Parkinson's or Diffuse Lewy Body disease or similar disease..

      Parasites
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl5usptx8... (tapeworm larvae cause cysts in brain)

  47. QUESTION:
    Can Thyroid Nodules/Cysts Be Hereditary?
    My grandma had a NON CANCEROUS thyroid mass and she had it removed YEARS ago.
    I have the same mass pretty much and YES I am getting it looked at by drs.
    I've had it for over 5 years or so....

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid diseases can be hereditary, but I don't believe that nodules and cysts are.

  48. QUESTION:
    what are lung cysts, what is the cause?

    • ANSWER:
      Lung cyst

      a nonspecific term usually used to describe the presence in the lung of a thin-walled, well-defined and well-circumscribed lesion, greater than 1 cm in diameter. Cysts may contain either air or fluid, but this term is usually used to refer to an air-containing lesion, or air-filled cyst. Air-filled cysts are commonly seen in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis and lymphangiomyomatosis, but can be seen in other diseases as well (see cystic pulmonary metastasis, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP)). Cysts in patients with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia probably represent pneumatocoeles (Fig.1) Honeycombing also results in the presence of cysts. This term is not usually used to refer to the focal lucencies associated with emphysema (bullae) or cystic bronchiectasis. Unlike cavities, cysts are not usually the result of necrosis.

      Cysts can be caused by:

      * Tumors
      * Genetic conditions
      * Infections
      * A fault in an organ of a developing embryo
      * A defect in the cells
      * Chronic inflammatory conditions
      * Blockages of ducts in the body which cause a fluid build-up
      * A parasite
      * Impact injury that breaks a vessel

      Treatment for a cyst will depend on various factors, including the type of cyst, where it is, its size, and the degree of discomfort it is causing.

      A very large cyst that causes symptoms can be surgically removed. Sometimes the doctors may decide to drain or aspirate the cyst by inserting a needle or catheter into the cavity. If the cyst is not easily accessible, drainage or aspiration is often done with the help of radiologic imaging so that the doctor can accurately guide the needle/catheter into the target area.

      Sometimes the aspirated liquid is examined under a microscope to determine whether cancerous cells are present.

      If doctors suspect the cyst may be cancerous it may be removed surgically, or a biopsy of the capsule (cyst wall) may be ordered.

      Many cysts arise as a result of a chronic or underlying medical condition, as may be the case with fibrocystic breast disease or polycystic ovary syndrome - in such cases the focus of treatment is on the medical condition.

  49. QUESTION:
    Polycystic kidney disease?
    My daughter has 3 cyst on her right kidney and grade one reflux on the left. Does having cyst on the kidney always mean PKD ? Is PKD always inherited ? it isn't any where in our family that I know of. She is 9, one cyst was found 2 years ago and now 3 cyst have been found. If you have PKD, can you me any insight. The doctor said he would see her in 6 months and do another ultrasound in a year, I don't want to wait a year to find if she has PKD. I need answers ...
    Thanks,
    Amy

    • ANSWER:
      Here are some links about PKD, that you can click on:
      http://www.pkdcure.org/tabid/1556/Default.aspx
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polycystic_kidney_disease

      Polycystic: poly means many, cystic means with cysts

      Some can have cysts on their kidneys and it is not
      inherited and they don't know, for certain, why they develop.

      Cysts can be fluid filled, complex..meaning there is
      something other than fluid in them or rarely, cancerous.

      They usually just watch the cysts to see if they do
      enlarge in size and how fast. They can operate to
      remove the wall of the cyst so they will drain into the
      body and the body will absorb them; if they do enlarge.
      To just poke them and try to drain is not good, as they
      can heal and form more fluid inside of them.

      Hope this is of some help...best wishes
      (you might want to ask for a second opinion...you may
      get answers faster this way.

  50. QUESTION:
    Complex kidney cyst on right kidney?
    I went to the doctor for a routine physical and they ordered some blood work. It came back that my liver enzymes were elevated and my platelets were low. So I had an ultrasound done on my liver and gall bladder. The results are back and it said that I have fatty tissue around my liver, which they said was commen in over weight people ( I am a 32 year old female 5 foot 9 inches and 220 lbs) but it also said that I have a complex cyst on my right kidney. My doctor wants to wait a month and do the blood work agian and "see" what the cyst does. Everything I have looked up about the cyst points to cancer. This is making me really nervous. Has this happened to anyone else before? I have started exersizing and eating better to get my weight down to a resonable level. I don't like waiting to see what this cyst will do, has anyone had this happen and it turned out to be nothing?

    • ANSWER:
      There are different types of cysts that could be on your kidney:
      Fluid filled: of which the doctor will just watch this by film testing to
      see if it ever enlarges in size.
      Cortical: of which the cyst is filled with something other than
      fluid: like blood, proteins, etc.
      Cancerous: of which it could be what is known as renal cell
      carcinoma.
      One ultrasound is not enough to determine exactly what this is.
      It may take Ct scans and other scans to look at it more closely.
      IF they do say it is cancer, it is best to get a second opinion.
      Most of the time it isn't cancer, but one
      of the other two. It is best to be with a Urologist now.
      .........................
      Now for the fatty liver disease.
      There is normally about 5% fat inside a healthy liver. But,
      as fat continues to build up inside the liver, it can cause
      pressure in the liver and damage the liver cells. If this
      takes place, the immune system of your body may
      respond to this and cause inflammation to develop
      inside the liver...which will lead to the liver enlarging
      in size and taking on a spongy texture. This is then
      no longer simple fatty liver, it is called
      Steatohepatitis.
      In order to remedy this, you need to find out the cause
      of the fatty liver for sure and then follow your doctors
      advice to reverse it.
      Some of the causes of fatty liver disease are:
      weight gain (obesity), fast weight loss, malnourishment,
      diabetes, insulin resistance, certain kinds of medications
      (like steriods), metabolic disorders, high cholesterol/triglyceride
      levels, exposure to chemicals, (some develop this condition
      in the third trimester of pregnancy)...(having Hepatitis C makes
      it more likely to develop it), and others.

      I hope this information has been of some help to you.
      Best wishes


are cyst cancerous diseases