Fluid On Ovary Questions

Once you have passed the driving theory test you can then apply to take your practical driving test. The driving part of your test will last about 40 minutes. Throughout the test your examiner will be looking for an overall safe standard of driving, including when you are carrying out the set exercises. Show me tell me questions are one of the part of your driving practical test.

These questions in the DSA practical test aim at checking your knowledge about the car safety and maintenance. In this "show me tell me"/"tell me show me" section, you are required to show the examiner how to check the brakes, fluid levels, lights, direction indicators etc. "Show me" type question is to demonstrate your knowledge about the asked question by the examiner. "Tell me" is verbal type of a question. Though answering incorrectly for 2-3 questions does not fail you in the driving practical exam, there will be 1 minor fault. 16 or more minor driving faults, or one serious or one dangerous fault will result in a test failure.

Below are some of the Show me tell me questions which may be asked in your practical exams :

1) Engine coolant:
Q : Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine coolant level and tell me how you would check that the engine has the correct level.
A : . Identify high / low level markings on header tank (where fitted) or radiator filler cap, and describe how to top up to correct level.

2) Engine oil:
Q : Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A : Identify dipstick / oil level indicator, describe how you would check the oil level against the minimum / maximum markers.

3) Windscreen washer fluid:
Q: Identify where the windscreen washer reservoir is and tell me how you would check the windscreen washer level.
A: Identify reservoir and check level. Check your car's manual to see how to do this.

4) Brake lights:
Q: Tell me how you would check that the brake lights are working on this car.
A: Operate brake pedal, make use of any reflections in windows, garage doors etc, or ask someone to help.

5) Brakes:
Q: Tell me how you would check that the brakes are working before starting a journey.
A: Brakes should not feel spongy or slack. Brakes should be tested as you set off. Vehicle should not pull to one side.

6) Tyre Pressures:
Q : Tell me where you would find the information for the recommended tyre pressures for this car and how tyre pressures should be checked.
A : Manufacturer's guide, use a reliable pressure gauge, check and adjust pressures when tyres are cold, don't forget spare tyre, remember to refit value caps.

All examiners are trained to carry out the test to the same standard, they do not have pass or fail quotas. So as long as you demonstrate the standard required you will pass your driving test. Get the good driving instructor and learn all the rules and regulations required for your practical test with all the show me tell me questions and pass your driving test accordingly.

123driving.co.uk provides you with all the information of driving course and related driving activities. It also provides free driving lesson booking service for students looking for local driving instructors, ADI, schools within your local area.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Ovary/ Surgery question!?
    Almost 2 years ago (1 year 11 months ago, at age 13) I had a partial oophorectomy (meaning I have no right ovary or fallopian tube) So I was wondering, how long until the fluids will completely drain? Because they're leaving a small pooch at the bottom of my stomach and it's beginning to bother me

    • ANSWER:
      The pooch is from the surgery, from damage to your skin and muscles, not from any fluid.

  2. QUESTION:
    Question about female ovary?
    So what is the difference between PCOS and follicles in/on ovary? Is that the same thing?
    So is it okay if the obgyn uses the term "follicles" while doing the transvaginal ultrasound.

    • ANSWER:
      follicles are areas where the egg is released on the ovary. PCOS is a hormone imbalance that causes fluid filled cysts on the ovary.

  3. QUESTION:
    what is wrong? ovary question?
    Well last month i had 2 periods and im waiting for the next one. Throughout this whole month i have had random sharp pains in abdomin (it feels like my ovaries are cramping). When i lay on my back and press down on my rt ovary and forward i get a shooting pain. It doesnt happen on my lft. Im kind of sick already so i dont know is some of the symptoms are from being sick or my ovary problems.

    I have swollen lympth nodes
    headache but it goes away when i lay down.
    i do notice that i pee alot, but i dont know if thats because i drink alot of fluids. Im alittle bloated but that might be from my period being so close.
    My cervix is normal-hard low and closed

    I dont know im just alittle worried. The only time i could get into the gyno is in a month. Should i wait that long?

    • ANSWER:
      its sounds like you might have an ovarian cyst or you could have endometrosis.

      to possibly explain the 2 periods last month you could have have s cyst on your ovary. because if you have a cyst there there usually rupture when you get you period due to menstration. that could have been the cause of the 2 period.

      another thing is the fact that you are urinating alot more could be due to the endometrosis, but that depends if you have pelvic pain or not, but the endometrosis does cause headaches which would explain that.

      but the best thing i would suggest is to see your OB/GYN and maybe research what i have told you to get some info on it and to see you symtoms.

      Note: a Good website to check these things out is www.webmd.com

      hope i could help and good luck

  4. QUESTION:
    What is trace free fluid mean in the pelvis like physiologic?
    Found on ctscan along with left ovarian cyst measuring 23mm in diameter, also there is atheromatous changes in the aorta and its branches. Phleboliths are seen in the pelvis.mild fatty changes seen throughout the liver, I haven't been to the Dr. Yet to discuss results yet, I want to know what all this means, any info appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Interesting question!
      Ovarian cyst is a fluid filled sac in the ovary. It is totally different from a tumour. It is infected and it can grow bigger and become painful. If they grow big they sometimes have to be removed my surgery.

      Atheromas in aorta is when the Aorta becomes calcified. It is very common. This is of no clinical significance unless the aorta becomes aneurysmal. The diameter of the Aorta can reach 6cm before surgery is required. The bad news is it can mean you could be prone to atheromatous changes in other parts of the body like the coronary arteries and in the brain, so have a diet very low in saturated fats.

      Phleboliths are an x ray finding. They are the calcified remains of old blood vessels. they have no clinical significance at all.

      Free fluid in pelvis could mean fluid on the ovary or in uterus, or fallopian tubes or anywhere. The pelvis is such a big area of the body. I good guess to what it is is a bluid up of fluid around the ovary because the cyst is causing a blockage, in what structure? - could be in anything. You need more information though and to speak to your doctor about it. Maybe the ovary is infected and this infected fluid coming out of it cannot escape because the cyst has blocked the drainage system or the fallopian tubes might be inflamed too with the infection causing a narrowing. I think the ovary is probably producing this fluid but I don't know anything else about you so I could be wrong.

  5. QUESTION:
    ovary pain (question and information about ovary pain)?
    I am a 36 years old, up until 5 years or so ago, I had sever pain on my right ovary side. I went to doc. after doc. all telling me it was a cysct on my ovary. The pain was so bad when it hit I would double over and couldn't stand up stright for DAYS. I finally found a wonderful doctor who wanted to finally look in side and see what was going on. He did and what he found shocked him! He told my husband he didn't not see how I was taking the pain I must have been in. My tube on my right side was blocked and filled with toxic fluid, it was 5 times it's normal size. How any of the other doc. couldn't see this in sonograms and such still has me wondering. He had to remove my tube it had been like that for so long there was no saving it. He did leave my ovary because we wanted more kids at that time.
    Now for my question, it's been about 5 years now and up until the last 6 mo. I've been pain free on that side. Each mo. goes by and my periods get more painful. Yesterday I was really achy on my right side ONLY and I started my period that afternoon, Last night I woke with a sharp pain, (I take sleeping pills so for somethign to wake me up it has to be bad) I was groggy but in enough pain I wanted to go to the ER. I took 3 ibprofin and after awhile feel back to sleep. It's been about 7 hrs and the achey pain is coming back, praying for the sharp pains not to. This pain seems to be involved with my period too, I do not have a tube on that side so it's just the ovary that is hurting. Thanks for any answers you may have.
    info: I wish I could go back to the doc. that found all this but I live in another state now. The pain I had before he took my tube always happend around my period time, my period was the reason of the pain because it was filling up the tube each mo. and had no where to go but sit which turned in to toxic fluid. This was all caused from PID that I had years earlier.

    • ANSWER:
      Hmmm... hard to tell... I'm no doctor! You may want to look into Polycystic ovary syndrome and also Endometriosis. These are 2 different diseases that affect many women (they are both pretty common) Both also affect fertility so if you find out you do have one of these and you get surgery to correct the pain (for now) you may want to get on trying to have kids as with time these diseases will cause infertility. Do some research and see if your symptoms match, and make an appointment with the doctor that helped you before (if he is a gynecologist) to get the proper testing done to see.

  6. QUESTION:
    I have fluid around my ovary?
    I have fluid around my ovary?
    I posted a question last night about pain in my right side. I still have the pain, but I went to the ER this morning and had an ultrasound, a vaginal ultrasound, blood test, and a CT scan. The doctor said my appendix looks fine, but that the ultrasounds found fluid around my right ovary. He didn't really explain it, but he didn't seem too worried.

    What would cause fluid around my ovary, and is it serious?

    Also, the pain I'm feeling isn't really over my ovary, it's more on my side.
    I circled the area on this picture: http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m92/kessh403/pain2.png

    could the pain be from the ovary, but still be a bit away from the ovary?
    the pain is more dull and achy, and occasionally it feels like a pin pricks me for a split second.

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible that you had an ovarian cyst that ruptured. This would result in fluid in that area that will eventually be reabsorbed by your body. Cysts are very painful when they rupture so that may account for your right sided pain.

  7. QUESTION:
    !health homework questions!?
    for this section in health we are learning about the male and female reproductive system.this week is female and and have some homework health questions i need help on: ps there fill in the blank questions.so if u see the word WHAT thats a blank.
    1.eggs are swept into the WHAT?
    2.eggs are fertilized by WHAT?
    3.the uterus is signaled by WHAT to maintain its thick lining.
    4.a WHAT moves from the fallopian tube into the uterus.a WHAT? has then occured.
    5.if a egg is not fertilized,the egg breaks down and moves to the WHAT and
    WHAT and the lining of the uterus down.
    6.then fluid passes out of te body through the WHAT during the WHAT.

    thanxs it will really help

    • ANSWER:
      1. Ovaries
      2. Sperm
      3. No Clue
      4. Miss Carriage
      5. Once again... no clue
      6. Vagina, Menstural Cycle

      Sorry i don't get number 3 and 5....

  8. QUESTION:
    I have fluid around my ovary?
    I have fluid around my ovary?
    I posted a question last night about pain in my right side. I still have the pain, but I went to the ER this morning and had an ultrasound, a vaginal ultrasound, blood test, and a CT scan. The doctor said my appendix looks fine, but that the ultrasounds found fluid around my right ovary. He didn't really explain it, but he didn't seem too worried.

    What would cause fluid around my ovary, and is it serious?

    Also, the pain I'm feeling isn't really over my ovary, it's more on my side.
    I circled the area on this picture: http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m92/kessh403/pain2.png

    could the pain be from the ovary, but still be a bit away from the ovary?
    the pain is more dull and achy, and occasionally it feels like a pin pricks me for a split second.

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    question for ladies only?????????/?
    today is my 14th day of my periods and they stopped after 4days of 11/6/2011 and i took follicular test on my 14th day that is today it shows that my follicle length is 24 mm and endometriosis is 5mm so i wud like to know when my follicle will be ruptured and when my egg will be released.please can anyone tell which day ill be ovulating so that i wanna plan my pregnancy sure as i mentioned my follicle length is 24mm today(14th day of my period)so please tell me exactly when ill ovulate.thanks.
    well age is 21.
    that's very nice divya,but can u tell me the exact day of my ovulation as i mentioned the follicle size 24mm.

    • ANSWER:
      Normally, one of the ovaries releases a single mature egg every month, and this is called ovulation. Women may notice pain or abdominal discomfort at the time of ovulation and occasionally have some slight vaginal bleeding. The presence of regular periods, premenstrual tension and dysmenorrhoea (period pains) usually indicate that the menstrual cycles are ovulatory.

      Eggs are stored in the ovaries in follicles. Follicles exist in two major categories growing and non-growing ( primordial ). Eggs in the primordial follicle are in a very immature form. In this state they are not capable of being fertilized by a sperm until they undergo a maturing process which culminates in their release from the ovary at the time of ovulation. Egg maturation and ovulation is stimulated by two hormones secreted by the pituitary - follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) . These two hormones must be produced in appropriate amounts throughout the monthly cycle for normal ovulation to occur. Every month, at the start of the menstrual cycle, in response to the FSH produced by the pituitary gland, about 30-40 primordial follicles start to grow. Of these, only one matures to form a large fluid-filled structure, called a Graafian follicle which contains a mature egg, while the others die ( a process called atresia). The mature egg is released from the follicle when the follicle ruptures in response to a surge of LH produced by the pituitary.

      After ovulation has occured, the follicle from which the egg has been released forms a cystic structure called the corpus luteum. This is responsible for progesterone production in the second half of the cycle.

      Most women who have regular periods have ovulatory cycles. Women who fail to ovulate or who have abnormal ovulation usually have a disturbance of their menstrual pattern. This may take the form of complete lack of periods (amenorrhoea), irregular or delayed periods (oligomenorrhoea) or occasionally a shortened cycle due to a defect in the second part (luteal phase) of the cycle.

  10. QUESTION:
    Ovarian cyst question?
    Okay so I had one a yr ago it was very tiny and no worries the dr said, and it ended up going away. I know an ovarian cyst is caused from an egg maturing and doesnt quite make it to the uterus right? Please explain if I'm wrong. I thought that birth control controlled that, but I was on birth control and thats when I got one, does that mean I was ovulating that month on my birth control pill when I wasn't suppose to be?

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain.

  11. QUESTION:
    I have fluid around my ovary?
    I post a question last night about pain in my right side. I still have the pain, but I went to the ER this morning and had an ultrasound, a vaginal ultrasound, blood test, and a CT scan. The doctor said my appendix looks fine, but that the ultrasounds found fluid around my right ovary. He didn't really explain it, but he didn't seem to worried.

    What would cause fluid around my ovary, and is it serious?

    Also, the pain I'm feeling isn't really over my ovary, it's more on my side.
    I circled the area on this picture: http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m92/kessh403/pain2.png

    could the pain be from the ovary, but still be a bit away from the ovary?
    the pain is more dull and achy, and occasionally it feels like a pin pricks me for a split second.

    • ANSWER:

  12. QUESTION:
    Polycystic ovaries?!?
    I have some questions regarding polycystic ovaries. Why do they form? How are they treated? Do they cause infertility? What are the chances of these cysts returning after treatment and Are they typically painful?

    Please only serious answers...no games!

    • ANSWER:
      What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      PCOS is a health problem that can affect a woman s menstrual cycle, fertility, hormones, insulin production, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. Women with PCOS have these characteristics:

      high levels of male hormones, also called androgens
      an irregular or no menstrual cycle
      may or may not have many small cysts in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.
      PCOS is the most common hormonal reproductive problem in women of childbearing age.

      How many women have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      An estimated five to 10 percent of women of childbearing age have PCOS.

      What causes Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      No one knows the exact cause of PCOS. Women with PCOS frequently have a mother or sister with PCOS. But there is not yet enough evidence to say there is a genetic link to this disorder. Many women with PCOS have a weight problem. So researchers are looking at the relationship between PCOS and the body s ability to make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body s use or for storage. Since some women with PCOS make too much insulin, it s possible that the ovaries react by making too many male hormones, called androgens. This can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and ovulation problems.

      Why do women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have trouble with their menstrual cycle?
      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman's uterus. A woman's ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs are also called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one becomes dominant. As the one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release the egg so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. They may start to grow and accumulate fluid. But no one egg becomes large enough. Instead, some may remain as cysts. Since no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman s menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Also, the cysts produce male hormones, which continue to prevent ovulation.

      What are the symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility or inability to get pregnant because of not ovulating
      increased growth of hair on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      pelvic pain
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      sleep apnea excessive snoring and breathing stops at times while asleep
      What tests are used to diagnose Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam possibly including an ultrasound, check your hormone levels, and measure glucose, or sugar levels, in the blood. If you are producing too many male hormones, the doctor will make sure it s from PCOS. At the physical exam the doctor will want to evaluate the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. During a pelvic exam, the ovaries may be enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. This can be seen more easily by vaginal ultrasound, or screening, to examine the ovaries for cysts and the endometrium. The endometrium is the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if there has not been a regular period.

      How is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) treated?
      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatments are based on the symptoms each patient is having and whether she wants to conceive or needs contraception. Below are descriptions of treatments used for PCOS.

      Birth control pills. For women who don t want to become pregnant, birth control pills can regulate menstrual cycles, reduce male hormone levels, and help to clear acne. However, the birth control pill does not cure PCOS. The menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone, like Provera, to regulate the menstrual cycle and prevent endometrial problems. But progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

      Diabetes Medications. The medicine, Metformin, also called Glucophage, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes, also helps with PCOS symptoms. Metformin affects the way insulin regulates glucose and decreases the testosterone production. Abnormal hair growth will slow down and ovulation may return after a few months of use. These medications will not cause a person to become diabetic.

      Fertility Medications. The main fertility problem for women with PCOS is the lack of ovulation. Even so, her husband s sperm count should be checked and her tubes checked to make sure they are open before fertility medications are used. Clomiphene (pills) and Gonadotropins (shots) can be used to stimulate the ovary to ovulate. PCOS patients are at increased risk for multiple births when using these medications. In vitro Fertilization (IVF) is sometimes recommended to control the chance of having triplets or more. Metformin can be taken with fertility medications and helps to make PCOS women ovulate on lower doses of medication.

      Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. If a woman is not trying to get pregnant there are some other medicines that may reduce hair growth. Spironolactone is a blood pressure medicine that has been shown to decrease the male hormone s effect on hair. Propecia, a medicine taken by men for hair loss, is another medication that blocks this effect. Both of these medicines can affect the development of a male fetus and should not be taken if pregnancy is possible. Other non-medical treatments such as electrolysis or laser hair removal are effective at getting rid of hair. A woman with PCOS can also take hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing.

      Surgery. Although it is not recommended as the first course of treatment, surgery called ovarian drilling is available to induce ovulation. The doctor makes a very small incision above or below the navel, and inserts a small instrument that acts like a telescope into the abdomen. This is called laparoscopy. The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn't help with increased hair growth and loss of scalp hair.

      A healthy weight. Maintaining a healthy weight is another way women can help manage PCOS. Since obesity is common with PCOS, a healthy diet and physical activity help maintain a healthy weight, which will help the body lower glucose levels, use insulin more efficiently, and may help restore a normal period. Even loss of 10% of her body weight can help make a woman's cycle more regular.

      How does Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) affect a woman while pregnant?
      There appears to be a higher rate of miscarriage, gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, and premature delivery in women with PCOS. Researchers are studying how the medicine, metformin, prevents or reduces the chances of having these problems while pregnant, in addition to looking at how the drug lowers male hormone levels and limits weight gain in women who are obese when they get pregnant.

      No one yet knows if metformin is safe for pregnant women. Because the drug crosses the placenta, doctors are concerned that the baby could be affected by the drug. Research is ongoing.

      Does Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) put women at risk for other conditions?
      Women with PCOS can be at an increased risk for developing several other conditions. Irregular menstrual periods and the absence of ovulation cause women to produce the hormone estrogen, but not the hormone progesterone. Without progesterone, which causes the endometrium to shed each month as a menstrual period, the endometrium becomes thick, which can cause heavy bleeding or irregular bleeding. Eventually, this can lead to endometrial hyperplasia or cancer. Women with PCOS are also at higher risk for diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Getting the symptoms under control at an earlier age may help to reduce this risk.

      Does Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) change at menopause?
      Researchers are looking at how male hormone levels change as women with PCOS grow older. They think that as women reach menopause, ovarian function changes and the menstrual cycle may become more normal. But even with falling male hormone levels, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause.

  13. QUESTION:
    I have an ovarian cyst? I have (lots of) questions?
    I have to do the u/s but then what?? Do I just live w/this pain off/on? If it's ruptured does it keep coming back?
    I have already had my children (2) and my hubby had a vasectomy done, I have NO desire to have more kids. Is taking out my ovaries an option to stop this? Do they even do that? I had a million questions at the DR but had my children w/me so it was impossible to address all my ques at the time.

    What is the link to cysts and cancer?? What causes some to have to have surgery while others just say it happens to me all the time? I have not taking b/c for about 1.5 years now...is this why it's happening to me now. Any help to any of my questions that you know would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      A cyst is a fluid-filled sac, and can be located anywhere in the body. On the ovary, different types of cysts can form. The most common type of ovarian cyst is called a functional cyst, which often forms during the normal menstrual cycle. Each month, a woman's ovaries grow tiny cysts that hold the eggs. When an egg is mature, the sac breaks open to release the egg, so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. Then the sac dissolves. In one type of functional cyst, called a follicular cyst, the sac doesn't break open to release the egg and may continue to grow. This type of cyst usually disappears within one to three months. A corpus luteum cyst, another type of functional cyst, forms if the sac doesn t dissolve. Instead, the sac seals off after the egg is released. Fluid then builds up inside of it. This type of cyst usually goes away on its own after a few weeks. However, it can grow to almost four inches and may bleed or twist the ovary and cause pain. Clomid or Serophene, which are drugs used to induce ovulation, can raise the risk of getting this type of cyst. * These cysts are almost never associated with cancer. *

      How are cysts treated?
      Watchful waiting. The patient waits and gets re-examined in one to three months to see if the cyst has changed in size. This is a common treatment option for women who are in their childbearing years, have no symptoms, and have a fluid-filled cyst. It also might be an option for postmenopausal women.

      Surgery. If the cyst doesn t go away after several menstrual periods, has gotten larger, looks unusual on the ultrasound, causes pain, or you re postmenopausal, the doctor may want to remove it. There are two main surgical procedures:

      Laparoscopy if the cyst is small and looks benign on the ultrasound, your doctor may perform a laparoscopy. This procedure is done under general anesthesia. A very small incision is made above or below the navel, and a small instrument that acts like a telescope is inserted into the abdomen. If the cyst is small and looks benign, it can be removed.

      Laparotomy if the cyst is large and looks suspicious, the doctor may perform a procedure called a laparotomy. This procedure involves making bigger incisions in the stomach to remove the cyst. While you are under general anesthesia, the doctor is able to have the cyst tested to find out if the tissue is cancerous. If it is cancerous, the doctor may need to remove the ovary and other tissues that may be affected, like the uterus or lymph nodes.

      Birth control pills. If you frequently develop cysts, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to prevent you from ovulating. This will lower the chances of forming new cysts.

  14. QUESTION:
    I'm Asking This Question For A Friend,What Causes Your Stomach To Get Bloated When You Have Cyst On Ovaries ?
    What Causes Your Stomach To Get Bloated When You Have Cyst On Ovaries ? And Makes Your Stomach Look Preg. and shes not even preg, and shes fix whos in her 40's(please forgive me iam not a good speller)

    • ANSWER:
      There are some things like hypersitmulationof the ovaries where fluid can get in to the stomach and surrounding organs which can be fairly serious and would need immediate medical attention. However, it is usually coupled with staggering pain which required the person to go to the hospital and comes with other symptoms such as fast heart rate and trouble breathing.

      Other ways a cyst can cause bloating/swelling......

      You have to keep in mind that everyhting down there is fairly close together so, if there is a cyst on the ovary, it can cause the ovary to swell, which can press against the pelvis, which can press against the bowels, and the sotmach and the utereus and so on and so on... So it is possible if there is swelling from the cyst, it can affect other organs. Also, it can cause irritable bowels which can cause bloating and distension

      Another thing that can happen is if the cyst is starting to rupture, there can be fluid and/or blood that can get in to the abdominal cavity and cause bloating and distenion, agian this is usually with mild to sever pain that increases as the cyst ruptures.

      Another things that can cause this, and I do not mean to alarm you is ovarian cancer.

      In any case, the above is no substituition for the adivce of her medical professional and if she is having swelling and/or bloating, it needs to be throughly investigated to ensure it is not very serious or before it gets very serious.

      Best of luck to her, she is lucky to have a friend who cares!!!

  15. QUESTION:
    what can loose fluid in the abdomen mean? serious answers only please?
    been to docs about a painful stomach (answer to one of my previous questions), and she said i had loose fluid in the abdomen which needs investigating, anyone know what it means?

    • ANSWER:
      Doctors should be much more specific when they speak to patients. If they were Health Answers would only have have half the questions that it does now.

      Fluid in the abdomen brings only one thing to mind ascites. This can be caused by liver, heart, kidney, ovary or pancreatic problems. It can also be associated with tumours of the abdomen. Assuming your doctor is correct about the ascites diagnosis in the first place, you will have to wait for more investigation.

  16. QUESTION:
    Question about Bilateral Cysts?
    I took a fun trip to the ER last week because I was in severe pain. 6 hours and two ultrasounds later the doctor came in to tell me I had a deflated cyst and the fluid from it was in the pelvic area. He then said there were more cysts Bilaterally. This may sound stupid, but what does that mean? What does the term Bilaterally infer? Thanks for any help.

    • ANSWER:
      Bilateral cysts means that you have cysts on both of your ovaries (both sides). I have experienced the same thing in the past and had bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 10 years.

      If you have any further questions regarding ovarian cysts, please feel free to email me, the link to my email is in my profile.

      Hope this answers your question. Good luck :)

  17. QUESTION:
    cysts question?!!?
    I have a cyst on my left ovary.
    If it doesn't burst then will surgery be necessary?
    How does it feel if it bursts?
    What is surgery like and is there any recovery time?

    Thanks! =)

    • ANSWER:
      Every woman gets cysts occasionally called functional cysts. A functional cyst is just built-up fluid in the ovary. It is normal most of the time. It is caused by ovulation. The cyst should shrink but in 1-3 months if it is still the same or bigger a doctor may do surgery (if it is a serious matter) or give birth control pills (to hold off ovulation for awhile to see if it will shrink). In most cases nothing has to be done and the cysts will go away. There is also a disease called polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). 5-10% of all women in the US have this disease. If you have this disease you will have many cysts on your ovaries (only detectable by laparascopy or ultrasound). I have this disease. I had had cysts every year at my pap smear so finally when we were trying to conceive my doctor diagnosed me with PCOS. Other symptoms of PCOS are excessive growth of hair, acne, diabetes, obesity, and

  18. QUESTION:
    Period talk!?! I have Questions.?
    TMI... I have PCOS and I have irregular cycles. This month I have had only dry brown blood during cycle. My husband and I have been trying to conceive for almost 2 years. My question is why is this happening and could I possibly be pregnant?

    other information: I have taken test and they were negative.
    i do have Polycystic ovary syndrome

    • ANSWER:
      Brownish shade of excreted fluids points at the presence of blood or ichor admixture in the mucus. Occurrence of such discharge often warns us about certain negative processes, running inside the organism.

      Such spotting may occur 1 or 2 days prior to menstrual bleeding, which is the norm. HOWEVER, if brownish discharge precedes your period for a longer term than 2 days, it s likely to be a symptom of a disorder, such as hormonal imbalance, infections and inflammation (endometritis), adenomyosis or diseases of the hematological origin.

      Brownish spotting in the MIDDLE of the cycle may mean progesterone deficiency or polycystic ovary syndrome.

  19. QUESTION:
    pregnacy question?
    i really want a baby!!!

    the thing is im not sure if i am able to concieve as i have been having unprotected sex with my boyfriend now for almost 3 years and have never been caught. about 2 years ago i stoped haveing periods and did not have one for about 8-10 month s i went to my doctor about this but they just told me to come back in 3 months if i do not have one anyway by the time i got round to going to my doctors again i had a period. after that they were very irregular like every 3 months they have since became normal again within the last 4 months could this have something to do with not conceving? and why do you think that thappend to my periods?
    no im not under weight. im about avarage if anything a i would be over weight.

    • ANSWER:
      could be PCOS:
      What is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)?
      Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's menstrual cycle, ability to have children, hormones, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. With PCOS, women typically have:
      high levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, although females also make them.
      missed or irregular periods
      many small cysts (sists) in their ovaries.
      Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.

      http://www.4woman.gov/FAQ/pcos.htm

      Or maybe you just abnormal hormone levels....You should have your Dr to some blood tests on you to find out what is going on.

  20. QUESTION:
    I Have a Question!!!!!?
    what is PCOS can any one tell me thanks !!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic ovarian syndrome
      Women who suffer from PCOS have cysts (fluid-filled sacs) on their ovaries that prevent the ovaries from performing normally. PCOS affects regular reproductive functions, like the menstrual cycle, as well as fertility. Ovaries of PCOS suffers tend to be from 1.5 to 3 times larger than normal ovaries.

  21. QUESTION:
    Pap Smear question....?
    Ok so i just been to the doc to get a Pap Smear and she told me i had alot of mucus on my cervix. Is that bad what does it mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Fluid or mucus that plugs the opening of the cervix. During ovulation when an egg is released from the ovary, the consistency of the mucus changes to allow sperm to enter the uterus.

      It's normal, it's something women moniter when they want to become pregnant.

  22. QUESTION:
    Vaginal Discharge Question...?
    I most always have vaginal discharge. The problem/question is this... Sometimes it's like white and kinda pastey.. somtimes its either clear or yellow and kinda stringy and sometimes it's like CLEAR and runny like water. I know it just depends on where you are in your cycle , but like, why the variation, and what causes it...

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when a woman is sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  23. QUESTION:
    Biology GCE 'O' Level questions..please help me...about reproduction in human?
    GCE O Levels Biology Matters Workbook

    Worksheet 14
    Free Response Questions

    1) Distinguish between the following terms:
    a) semen and sperm [3 marks]
    b) ovary and oviduct [3 marks]
    c) ovulation and menstruation [4 marks]

    2) Describe how a human embryo is protected and nourished inside its mother. [6 marks]
    --> Hint: What are the functions of the placenta, umbilical cord, amniotic sac and amniotic fluid?

    • ANSWER:
      1)a) sperm refers to the male gamete while semen refers to the fluid secreted by the penis....this is not just perm cells it also contains secretions form the caupers gland and prostate gland.
      b) the ovary is the structure in the female reproductive system that releases ova(eggs). the oviduct is a passage way for the ova into the urethra. it is also usually the site of fertilization.
      c) ovulation s the process by which the egg is released from the ovary. It is due to peak levels of estrogen. Menstruation is the process by which the urethra walls thicken to facilitate the implant of the zygote. this process is triggered by the hormone progesterone.
      2)the placenta is the connection between the embryo and the mother's body. through it, she supplies the embryo with oxygen, glucose and antibodies. the antibodies. the amniotic sack, the sack in which the embryo is in inside the mother serves to shield the embryo and the amniotic fluid acts as a shock absorber protection the baby from trauma experienced by the mother

      hope this was helpful

  24. QUESTION:
    Acetic fluid, Cancer?
    My father has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in sept 2009. He had 2 sets of chemo with Gemcite . He has started developing abdominal fluid in Dec 2009, which needs to be drained out.
    Every time its around 4-5 liter of fluid.My question is how frequently does it happen? I mean once a month or once a week? Can someone with exp give some input in this issue?
    Sorry but my dad passed way this morning......and all I want to say is I hate cancer. May God never give this to anyone.

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer accounts for about 10% of all cases of ascites & can occur when cancer has spread to the peritoneum (which is only a membrane that covers the entire abdominal wall of the body), from it's original site. Most patients with ascites are those who had or have cancer of the breast, ovaries, colon stomach or pancreas. I also had the same thing when I had my mastectomies. I had to be drained twice. However, it is especially common in individuals with advanced metastatic pancreatic cancer. There is no specific amount of time as to how often this procedure will have to be done. It may happen twice a month and may not come back for 2 months. It's very difficult to put a time on something like this. If he get it often, I'm talking more often than now. sometimes a Dr will insert a catheter which will drain the fluid continuously.
      One thing your dad should be doing is resting in a reclined position with his feet elevated to alleviate the pressure on the internal organs, and this helps improve blood flow returning from lower extremeties and increase fluid loss. It works great. Your dad should really speak to his Oncologist about this. I think he should tell you the same thing, but you do want to be absolutely sure about everything just for his own comfort. God bless, I do hope and pray he feels better.

  25. QUESTION:
    Ultrasound questions etc ?
    Ultrasound questions?? ?

    I had a ultrasound done at the hospital a couple weeks ago, they didn't tell me the results they just sent me home.. I complained of abdominal pain etc.. What do you think they looked at when they did the ultrasound??? They also did a IV cat scan through my abdominal and body what did they lOok at there too???

    Did they look at my ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes??? Or ???

    Oh they did a internal ultrasound

    • ANSWER:
      Internal they would be looking at your organs internally. Looking at the placement of your ovaries, bladder and such .Looking for anything abnormal such as abnormal size of anything, abnormal amount of fluid or even fluid where its not suppose to be, looking for cysts or tumors or anything wierdly placed( such as tilted or collasped) IV cat scan looking for same, but more indepth. Also able to look for leakage and misconnections.

  26. QUESTION:
    questions about periods?
    i havent started yet, but all the signs are here, so i want to know a few things:
    . can you feel it when it comes out?
    . what does it feel like?
    . how can you tell your about to start?
    . how can you tell the ache your feeling is cramp?
    . how long do cramps usually last?
    . how big are your hips usually when you start?
    . what are some common signs youre gonna start?

    im well prepared if i do start because ive got some pads to carry roundd xx

    • ANSWER:
      . Can you feel it when it comes out?
      Yes, in fact there are some women who are so in-tune with this feeling that when they feel the flow leave their cervix they go empty out their flow in the toilet, rather than using pads, tampons or cups.

      . What does it feel like?
      You normally feel a wet feeling, larger amounts of fluid than with discharge alone, and the feeling of the flow leaving your cervix is a little like a ticklish feeling in your cervix.

      . How can you tell your about to start?
      Your body will change with puberty, discharge, gain weight and breasts develop long before your periods as it takes time for hormones to act on your ovaries to start periods, but you should get periods within four years of those changes.

      . How can you tell the ache your feeling is cramp?
      If you do get cramps it feels like a heavy cramping feeling in your lower abdomen, you may also feel it in your back and legs try touching your cervix next time you have some privacy, the feeling you get is similar to the sort of feeling from menstrual cramps, only menstrual cramps tend to be more painful, it ll give you an idea of where the pain will be located.

      . How long do cramps usually last?
      If you do get cramps, again not everyone does and you can prevent them all together so you don t have to suffer from cramps at all. Cramps can start about a week before your period and last throughout your period, often you will only get them for the first few days, but everyone is different, it can be different from month to month, depends on your emotional and physical health.

      . How big are your hips usually when you start?
      There is no standard hip size, everyone is a different size.

      . What are some common signs youre gonna start?
      You may get signs just before your period like those you'll get with all your periods as hormones affect your body, but you may not realize what they are at the time. You may get cramps which aren't pleasant but preventable, you're just as likely to get pleasant signs like feeling energetic before your periods, discharge changes too so you may notice heavier discharge or your vaginal smell will change.

      Prepare for your first period, you may feel wetter or notice blood, pink or brown discharge. It's good that you keep pads with you, you may also want to carry spare underwear and clary sage oil for cramps with you, if you don't have pads at the time ask another girl or use toilet paper in your underwear. Pads are good to start with, organic (like Cottons) or cloth pads (like Lunapads) are best as they are healthier and more comfortable than commercial pads (like Always), you may want to try something else later, some girls use tampons to feel grown-up but tampons are unhealthy so it's best to use menstrual cups or softcups which will also make periods easier to deal with. Record your periods and changes to discharge, periods have a rhythm so recording these things helps you understand how your body changes and predicts your next period.

      Periods are as good or as bad as you make them, girls who feel good about their periods have happier periods, they also tend to learn about their periods so know best how to deal with them if they have any problems like cramps or heavy bleeding. Learn all you can now, check out sites like Scarleteen http://www.scarleteen.com and talk to your mom or leave her a note asking for books to explain things, like 'Period' by Joann Loulan & Bonnie Worthen, 'My body, my self for girls' by Lynda Madaras & Area Madaras, or something grown up like 'Cunt, a declaration of independence' by Inga Muscio. Celebrating your first period helps you feel good about your periods and celebrates your becoming a woman, it's also a good excuse to get something like a new outfit or have a sleep over, let your mom know what you want to do.

  27. QUESTION:
    A question on pregnancy and conception?
    What is the process of conception? i just need someone to summarize it in it in a simple way

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a primer on conception:

      Ovulation
      Each month, in one of a woman's two ovaries, a group of immature eggs start to develop in small fluid-filled cysts called follicles. Normally, one of the follicles is selected to complete development (maturation). This "dominant follicle" suppresses the growth of all of the other follicles, which stop growing and degenerate. The mature follicle ruptures and releases the egg from the ovary (ovulation). Ovulation generally occurs about two weeks before a woman's next menstrual period begins.

      Development of Corpus Luteum
      After ovulation, the ruptured follicle develops into a structure called the corpus luteum, which secretes two hormones, progesterone and estrogen. The progesterone helps prepare the endometrium (lining of the uterus) for the embryo to implant by thickening it.

      Release of Egg
      The egg is released and travels into the fallopian tube where it remains until a single sperm penetrates it during fertilization (the union of egg and sperm; see below). The egg can be fertilized for about 24 hours after ovulation. On average, ovulation and fertilization occurs about two weeks after your last menstrual period.

      Menses
      If no sperm is around to fertilize the egg, it and the corpus luteum will degenerate, removing the high level of hormones. This causes the endometrium to slough off, resulting in menstrual bleeding. Then the cycle repeats itself.

      Fertilization
      If sperm does meet and penetrate a mature egg after ovulation, it will fertilize it. When the sperm penetrates the egg, changes occur in the protein coating around it to prevent other sperm from entering. At the moment of fertilization, your baby's genetic make-up is complete, including its sex. Since the mother can provide only X chromosomes (she's XX), if a Y sperm fertilizes the egg, your baby will be a boy (XY); if an X sperm fertilizes the egg, your baby will be a girl (XX).

      Implantation
      Within 24-hours after fertilization, the egg begins dividing rapidly into many cells. It remains in the fallopian tube for about three days. The fertilized egg (called a zygote) continues to divide as it passes slowly through the fallopian tube to the uterus where its next job is to attach to the endometrium (a process called implantation). First the zygote becomes a solid ball of cells, then it becomes a hollow ball of cells called a blastocyst. Before implantation, the blastocyst breaks out of its protective covering. When the blastocyst establishes contact with the endometrium, an exchange of hormones helps the blastocyst attach. Some women notice spotting (or slight bleeding) for one or two days around the time of implantation. The endometrium becomes thicker and the cervix is sealed by a plug of mucus.

      Within three weeks, the blastocyst cells begin to grow as clumps of cells within that little ball, and the baby's first nerve cells have already formed. Your developing baby is called an embryo from the moment of conception to the eighth week of pregnancy. After the eighth week and until the moment of birth, your developing baby is called a fetus.
      Pregnancy Hormones
      Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (hCG) is a pregnancy hormone present in your blood from the time of conception and is produced by the cells that form the placenta. This is the hormone detected in a pregnancy test; but, it usually takes three to four weeks from the first day of your last period for the levels of hCG to be high enough to be detected by pregnancy tests.

      The development stages of pregnancy are called trimesters, or three-month periods, because of the distinct changes that occur in each stage.

  28. QUESTION:
    PLEASE Ovarian Cancer Question....?
    She has all the symptoms of Ovarian Cancer but they won't know more until Monday. I know nobody can tell me WHAT stage it is for sure but just wondering what you can go by for what I tell you......What does it sound like to you?
    She's 59 years old. She has been sick since April, having a hard time breathing. Thought it was due to smoking, wasn't. Lungs were filled with fluid and stomach is swollen as if she was 7 months pregnant. Her stomach has been swollen for years though but no other pain or anything. Her back hurts lower back, she's VERY wea can't do anything so we know she is sick and we pretty much know it's O.C. but can anybody give me some insight to what to expect on Monday?
    Thank you all so very much God bless!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like the fluid in her lungs are pleural effusions, an effect of the cancer. And her abdomen is swollen due to ascites, another effect of cancer. If it's in her lungs, then it's likely a stage 4 tumor. that's the highest stage, meaning it's spread far from its original site (the ovaries). That's not good news. But even women with stage 4 cancer can respond to treatment and recover health. Listen, this information is vital: she needs to be treated by a gynecologic oncologist. NOT A GYNECOLOGIST. NOT AN ONCOLOGIST. NOT A GENERAL SURGEON. But by a gynecologic oncologist. You wouldn't go to your gardener to get a haircut. So don't send your mother to be treated by someone who is not an expert in the exact disease she has! PATIENTS WHO ARE TREATED BY GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGISTS HAVE THE BEST SURVIVAL RATE!

      Also, go to here to get information and support: http://listserv.acor.org/SCRIPTS/WA-ACOR.EXE?A0=OVARIAN

      And read this article to help you to understand what survival statistics mean:
      http://cancerguide.org/median_not_msg.html

      Good luck! It's all very very upsetting and scary now, but starting Monday, you can swing into action to get your mom the best treatment out there!

  29. QUESTION:
    ovulation question, i need help please?
    im not tryin to get pregnant or anything i just want to understand this more.
    sooo idk how to tell when im ovulating i dont get it, like the cervix how do yu even tell where that is?
    and yes i know i dont need anyone to tell me im to young or just use protection or blah blah i just want to know.
    so could anyone help and tell me when im ovualting cause i really dont know.
    my period in october started the 14th and ended the 18th && in november i was late and started the 25 and ended the 29th?
    soo help please?

    • ANSWER:
      Ovulation occurs when a mature egg is released from the ovary, pushed down the fallopian tube, and is available to be fertilized. The lining of the uterus has thickened to prepare for a fertilized egg. If no conception occurs, the uterine lining as well as blood will be shed. The shedding of an unfertilized egg and the uterine wall is the time of menstruation.

      Key Facts of Ovulation:
      *An egg lives 12-24 hours after leaving the ovary
      *Normally only one egg is released each time of ovulation
      *Ovulation can be affected by stress, illness or disruption of normal routines
      *Some women may experience some light blood spotting during ovulation
      *Implantation of a fertilized egg normally takes place 6-12 days after ovulation
      *Each woman is born with millions of immature eggs that are awaiting ovulation to begin
      *A menstrual period can occur even if ovulation has not occurred
      *Ovulation can occur even if a menstrual period has not occurred
      *Some women can feel a bit of pain or aching near the ovaries during ovulation called mittelschmerz, which means "middle pain" in German
      *If an egg is not fertilized, it disintegrates and is absorbed into the uterine lining
      Free Forum to discuss ovulation and other things

      Tracking Ovulation:
      A woman's monthly cycle is measured from the first day of her menstrual period until the first day of her next period. On average, a woman's cycle normally is between 28-32 days, but some women may have much shorter cycles or much longer ones. Ovulation can occur at various times during a cycle, and may occur on a different day each month. It is important to track your cycle; there are tools online to help you do this: such as fertilityfriend.com. Your most important fertility sign is your cervical fluid - it is most like raw egg white when you are approaching ovulation.

      The Ovulation Cycle Divided into Two Parts:
      The first part of the ovulation cycle is called the follicular phase. This phase starts the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) and continues until ovulation. This first half of the cycle can differ greatly for each woman lasting anywhere from 7 days until 40 days. The second half of the cycle is called the luteal phase and is from the day of ovulation until the next period begins. The luteal phase has a more precise timeline and usually is only 12-16 days from the day of ovulation. This ultimately means that the day of ovulation will determine how long your cycle is. This also means that outside factors like stress, illness, and disruption of normal routine can throw off your ovulation which then results in changing the time your period will come. So the old thought that stress can affect your period is only partly true. Stress can affect your ovulation which ultimately determines when your period will come, but stress around the time of an expected period will not make it late it was already determined when it would come 12-16 days earlier!

      Fertility Awareness is one way to track when ovulation occurs, and it includes studying the changes in cervical mucus and using a basal thermometer. Cervical fluid will change to a wet, slippery substance that resembles "egg whites" just before ovulation occurs and until ovulation is over. A basal thermometer helps track a body temperature rise, which signals that ovulation has just occurred.

      Another way to track ovulation is through ovulation kits and fertility monitors. These can be Purchased Online. Tracking ovulation can help a woman get a better idea of when pregnancy can and cannot occur during her monthly cycle. Once ovulation has occurred, there is nothing you can do to increase your chances of pregnancy. Your next step is to begin watching for early pregnancy symptoms.

      From the Menstrual Period to Ovulation:
      When your menstrual cycle begins, your estrogen levels are low. Your hypothalamus (which is in charge of maintaining your hormone levels) sends out a message to your pituitary gland which then sends out the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). This FSH triggers a few of your follicles to develop into mature eggs. One of these will develop into the dominant follicle, which will release a mature egg and the others will disintegrate. As the follicles mature they send out another hormone, estrogen. The high levels of estrogen will tell the hypothalamus and pituitary gland that there is a mature egg.

      A luteinizing hormone (LH) is then released, referred to as your LH surge. The LH surge causes the egg to burst through the ovary wall within 24-36 hours and begin its journey down the fallopian tube for fertilization. The follicle from which the egg was released is called the corpus luteum, and it will release progesterone that helps thicken and prepare the uterine lining for implantation. The corpus luteum will produce progesterone for about 12-16 days (the luteal phase of your cycle.) If an egg is fertilized, the corpus luteum will continue to produce progesterone for a developing pregnancy unti

  30. QUESTION:
    TMI question for women?
    my sister is trying to get pregnant. Like me, she was told she has PCOS, however I think the doctors misdiagnosed her as she does not have any of the physical symptomology (facial hair, overweight etc.)

    My question is - if she is not ovulating, can she still experience EWCM?

    She was on day 14 of her cycle, and experienced EWCM for 2 days... does this mean she is ovulating?? Or can there be another reason for the CM?

    • ANSWER:
      Cervical mucusThroughout your menstrual cycle, which is from one period to the next, your cervix (the opening of the uterus) makes different types of discharge or mucus. You may start to see this mucus after your period ends. Usually it begins as cloudy in colour and if you stretch it between two fingers it would likely stretch about a quarter inch or less. As days go on it may appear clearer and stretchier (more than an inch).
      This type of mucus appears as you get closer to ovulation, which is when the egg comes out of your ovary and goes into your fallopian tube. The mucus helps sperm survive, possibly for up to five days, and travel up the uterus to the tube to fertilize the egg.
      Therefore when you see this type of discharge it is usually a sign of fertility in other words you could get pregnant. After ovulation this mucus tends to get thicker and dry up, and thus you may not notice any discharge.
      Sexual arousal fluidWhen you are sexually excited, your vagina makes a fluid that is cloudy or clear and feels wet. It usually goes away about 30 minutes after sexual excitement ends. This fluid makes intercourse or any type of penetration (eg. with fingers or sex toys) easier and more enjoyable. It may also help prevent condoms from breaking.
      Therefore, if at times during sexual activity you feel that you are not very moist you may want to be stimulated before more penetration and/or use a water-based lubricant.
      Female ejaculateSometimes women feel like they are going to urinate (pee) when they are having sex, or sometimes they think they actually did urinate. Usually this is because she is about to ejaculate or has ejaculated. Rarely is it in fact urine.
      Inside your vagina there is a gland that makes ejaculate fluid. Sometimes when you are sexually excited this fluid is secreted or sprayed out. This secretion is very wet, not sticky and may look like urine but is chemically different.
      Female ejaculation can happen with or without orgasm, and is very enjoyable. It should be noted that not all women ejaculate, and that is perfectly normal.
      However, for women who want to learn how to ejaculate, they are usually able to do so with some information and instruction.
      Abnormal discharge
      Non-sexual causesYour vagina is a self-cleansing, self-protecting organ. There are different microorganisms (eg. bacteria and yeast) that naturally live in your vagina. They work together in balance to protect you from infection.
      Sometimes however, this balance changes and you may notice an abnormal discharge, which could be yellowish, greenish, frothy, curdy, or thick. There may be a stronger smell than normal (we all have a certain smell from our vagina that is perfectly normal) and there may be itchiness and redness.
      Some possible causes are allergic reactions.For instance you may react to douching (which we don t recommend) or using deodorized tampons (which we also don t recommend), or spermicide. Another cause may be taking antibiotics, which can kill the good bacteria in your vagina that stops the overgrowth of yeast. The result may be a yeast infection.
      Another thing that may cause yeast to overgrow is the blood from your period. This blood changes the pH balance in your vagina, making it more alkaline which is the type of environment that yeast grows best in. This is usually why some women notice, around the time of their period, that they feel itchier and have a yeasty discharge, which may be yellowish, whitish, or curdy.
      Sexual causesUnlike the organisms mentioned above that normally live in your vagina, there are germs which do not belong in your body. Sometimes, through sexual contact, these organisms get inside of you, causing infection.
      Three common sexually transmitted infections are chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomonas. Unprotected sexual intercourse is the most common way for transmission to occur. A possible symptom of infection is an abnormal discharge that may be pus-like, watery, or thick and yellow. Some women may notice abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain with intercourse, or more frequent urination.
      It should be noted, however, that symptoms may take a long time, perhaps years, to show up. Some women won t have any symptoms of these infections at all. For this reason, we suggest that you get tested for infections at least every year.

  31. QUESTION:
    Women Question Please...?
    My period isn't for another week or so. And for the past 2 days that whitish discharge stuff from my vagina has had blood mixed in, and the disrcharge is coming out more often. Is something wrong with me, etc.??
    I'm not on any medication; I haven't had sex recently.
    It could be an earlier period, but it's not really heavy enough to really be a period... :/ At least I don't think so.

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal discharge means the fluid or mucus stuff that comes out of a girl's vagina. She might see it or feel it on her underpants.

      About 6 months to a year before a girl gets her first period, her body may start to produce vaginal discharge. This is normal and is caused by the changing level of hormones in a girl's body. This discharge helps to keep the vagina healthy. Girls continue to have vaginal discharge after they get their periods. Women also have this discharge, which continues until menopause when their bodies don't make as much of it.

      Normal vaginal fluids can vary. They might be thin and slightly sticky to thick and gooey. They can be clear to white or off-white in color. The amount of discharge can also vary depending upon a girl's menstrual cycle. For example, fluids tend to be a bit heavier around the time a girl ovulates (say: av-yuh-lates), which is when an egg is released from the ovary and moves into the fallopian tube.

      Normal discharge should have a slight odor and should never cause itching or burning. Problems like itching, a strong odor, or a change in color (such as brown, gray, or green) indicate that a girl may have a vaginal infection and needs to see a doctor.

      Sometimes a normal vaginal discharge can irritate the skin. This is due to the moisture against the skin. You can prevent skin irritation in the vaginal area, especially when it's hot and humid outside, by wearing cotton underwear and avoiding clothes like tight jeans and pantyhose that don't let your skin breathe. It is also important to keep your body clean by bathing on a regular basis. You don't need to do anything special to keep this part of your body clean. Just soap and water does the trick.

  32. QUESTION:
    Amniotic fluid loss at 9 weeks 3 days pregnant!?
    Hi,

    At 9 weeks 3 days, i had a gush of fluid slightly tinged red but mostly clear!
    It was a fair bit! I would say roughly 40 mils! And it ran down my legs past my knees.

    I know it was NOT peeurine and it smelt & looked exactly like amniotic fluid! (I have had a baby before)

    Anyways, as it happen, i pulled my undies away from my virgina (TMI) and looked down there. There was so much of it and as i pulled my undies the fluid had a watery string from my virgina to my undies! (Sorry again TMI).

    When this whole event occurred, i went to the ER at 12 o'clock-mid-night and they said they thought i was losing my baby, but they did not test my fluid in my vagina to see if it was amniotic (I don't know why they didn't, Im really angry about it!) As i know it was amniotic fluid!!!! NOT FREAKING PEE!!! Like they suggested, or heavy discharge!!! My god that makes me angry, I have had babies before, i know whats pee and whats amniotic fluid!!

    The following morning at 8 30 am, there was my little baby waving it's tiny arms and wriggling, and to top it off, a heartbeat of 171 bpm!!!

    So my question is, do you think it's possible that i was pregnant with a twin pregnancy and one was a blighted Ovum?

    Again, my next question is, is it possible for the ultrasound scan to completely miss a second single Yolk Sac?

    At my last ultrasound she said she COULDN'T find my LEFT OVARY at all !! lol I know i have two Ovaries, i have seen them before in my last pregnancy!!

    I am now 9 weeks and "5" days pregnant and have yet had no signs of a miscarriage, or anything else!
    I did have an ultrasound, that's when i saw the baby waving it's arms around and wriggling with a HB of 171 beats per minute!!!

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible you were leaking amniotic fluid. I was in hospital for 2 days over the weekend with prematurely ruptured membranes. I am 16 weeks and like you, had a big gush of fluid and rushed straight to hospital. I had tests done that revealed it was amniotic fluid and I was put on a drip for 2 days to prevent infection. They really should have did this for you too, its a simple procedure similar to a pap test. I would be asking your doctor to refer you for one.

      As for the left ovary its easy to miss when that is not really what the technician is looking for and twins im not sure, you would have to talk that over with your doctor. Did they measure the amniotic fluid around bub and make sure there was enough?
      I hope everything is ok for you.

  33. QUESTION:
    ....ruptured cyst on ovary....?
    i had extreme lower pain in my lower area and felt very nauseous.

    im 14, and i had to go to the ER a few days ago and they said i had a cyst on my right ovary that had partially ruptured :( All they did was give me pain meds and tell me to go see a gyno.

    i have a few questions tho....

    1. Is a ruptured cyst on the ovary very serious?
    2. What will the gyno check or do to me?
    3. Do you think the ovary would have to be tooken out?
    4. If the ovary is tooken out, could i still have a child when i get older?

    • ANSWER:
      if the cyst was on the ovary, your going to be fine. Its serious but theres not a whole lot they can really do. If it was fluid filled then your body will take care of the rest, but the gyno may want to operate depending on the size and if most of it is still there.

      The gyno will probably send you for an ultrasound, and possibly want to do an internal exam, which isnt comfortable but you can request them not to, just remember to actually drink water before your ultrasound.

      Unless there are serious complications when / if you have surgery to have it removed, then your ovary wont have to be taken out. It would have to be a life or death situation before they would take it out. And if they did, its still possible to have a child with only one working ovary.

      Talk to the gyno about all of your concerns as well. The doctor can elaborate more on all of your questions

  34. QUESTION:
    One ovary and fulid in fallopian tube?
    My husband and I have just started trying and I am concerned. I had a tumor on my left ovary and they had to remove it. Last time I went to the Dr. She said I had a small cyst (sp?) on my right (remaining ovary) and some fluid build up in my fallopian tube. She said it shouldn't be a problem for me to get pregnant. My question is has anyone else had this problem? Does it sound logical that I have these problems and can still get pregnant fairly easy? Sorry I know this probably doesn't sound like much of a question I'm just so ready to have a family and this has been a concern for me since my surgery. Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Did she clear the fluid out? If there is fluid in the fallopian tube, that can be dangerous for a pregnancy. The fluid can leak down into the uterus and it is toxic to an embryo. I had a fluid filled tube and had to have it removed. It can also cause you to be high risk for an eptopic pregnancy if you do get pregnant.

  35. QUESTION:
    i have a question about discharge...?
    wow, i know you get alot of questions like this but here goes...i have alot of discharge and its thick, sticky and a milky white. i obviously know its normal. duh. but everybodys always talking about how its right before their period but 1] i have already started my period. [im 14] and 2] i have this yucky discharge allll the time. and its really embarassing when im with my boyfriend...help? what can i do? is it normal to get it allllllll the time?!
    haha, and to "jessica", im sorry for being curious about my health. maybe i dont feel like payint 400 dollars to go the the doctor for a question i can ask on here. i dont see how im "gross"...lol...why did you even respond if you didnt like the question?
    and to "go mcain", lol, my boyfriend isnt looking down there. i was talking about the smell. haha. i probably should have been alot more specific. i'm holding onto my v-card until marrige...dont worry. lol. :]

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when a woman is sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  36. QUESTION:
    ovarian cyst questions.?
    okay so i went to the doctor because i keep having this pain in my lower abdomen and my doc said that there could be the possibility that i might have an ovarian cyst and sent me to get an ultrasound. i have to wait for the results for tomorrow or the day after.

    my question is having ovarian cyst is it normal for your stomach to hurt badly when laying down? i super sure its not a tummy ache due to food. since i havent eating anything but a banana and peach since noon. my ovaries hurt really bad if i lay on my back in my bed, in which i have to sleep sideways. (do you think that they are big?)

    one more thing. how do you know if they have ruptured?

    ive had these cysts pains since i started my very first period back in march. but just went to the doc last month because they started to get very painful that i had to go to the ER.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it is normal if you have a cyst, or cysts, for it to hurt around your ovaries when you are laying down. If they rupture, you may feel a very sharp pain on the side that the cyst ruptures on (but not always - I've had very sharp pains that have doubled me over, and some with pain that has gradually worsened), and it can ache pretty badly for up to a week afterward. The ultrasound will show fluid behind the ovary if you have had a rupture.

  37. QUESTION:
    can a cyst on ovaries cause a period not to come on?
    I have had a abnormal pap read went for the follow up they said they didnt see anything but someonwe bought this up in my last questions, what are the symptoms of cervical cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      * Cystadenomas. These cysts develop from cells on the outer surface of the ovary. They are often filled with a watery fluid or thick, sticky gel. They can become large and cause pain.
      * Dermoid cysts. The cells in the ovary are able to make hair, teeth, and other growing tissues that become part of a forming ovarian cyst. These cysts can become large and cause pain.
      * Polycystic ovaries. The eggs mature within the follicles, or sacs, but the sac doesn't break open to release the egg. The cycle repeats, follicles continue to grow inside the ovary, and cysts form.
      What are the symptoms of ovarian cysts?
      Many women have ovarian cysts without having any symptoms. Sometimes, though, a cyst will cause these problems:

      * pressure, fullness, or pain in the abdomen
      * dull ache in the lower back and thighs
      * problems passing urine completely
      * pain during sexual intercourse
      * weight gain
      * painful menstrual periods and abnormal bleeding
      * nausea or vomiting
      * breast tenderness

      Cervical cancer symptoms:

      Symptoms

      Pre-cancerous cervical conditions are generally painless. They are not easily detected unless the patient has a pelvic exam and a Pap smear. Symptoms include:

      * Abnormal bleeding. This happens only after the cervical cells become cancerous and invade neighboring tissues.
      * Unusual vaginal discharge
      * Increased bleeding during menstruation
      * Bleeding between regular menstrual periods or after sexual intercourse, douching or a pelvic exam
      * Difficulty or pain in urination
      * Pain during intercourse
      * Pain in the pelvic area
      * Pre- or post-menopausal bleeding.

  38. QUESTION:
    Question about ovulation pain (mittelschmerz)?
    (I'm not TTC, just want answers from women who actually know what they're talking about)

    I have been getting mittelschmerz for the last three cycles - but the pain stays very intense on just the right side of my abdomen and only slightly radiates across to the middle and a little on the left. The experts say the pain is felt on whatever side you are ovulating from, so does this mean that for the last 3 cycles I've only produced eggs from my right ovary?
    GYN doc says I'm fine and I know my body really well, so please don't suggest that I should get checked for tumors or cancer or anything. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Mittelschmerz is the pelvic and lower abdominal pain that some women experience during ovulation. (Ovulation generally occurs about midway between menstrual cycles hence the term mittelschmerz, which comes from the German words for "middle" and "pain."

      The pain of mittelschmerz can range from a mild twinge to severe discomfort and usually lasts from minutes to hours. It is generally felt on one side of the abdomen and may vary each month, depending on which ovary is releasing the egg during that cycle. In some cases, a small amount of vaginal bleeding or discharge may occur. Some women experience nausea, especially if the pain is severe.

      Who Gets Mittelschmerz?

      Many women never experience pain at ovulation. Some women, however, have mid-cycle pain every month and can determine by the pain that they are ovulating.

      What Causes Mittelschmerz?

      As an egg develops in the ovary, it is surrounded by follicular fluid. During ovulation, the egg and the fluid, as well as some blood, are released from the ovary. While the exact cause of mittelschmerz is unknown, it is believed that the fluid or blood may irritate the lining of the abdominal cavity, causing pain. The pain goes away once the body absorbs the fluid or blood.

      How Do I Know If I Have Mittelschmerz?

      Ovulation usually occurs about 2 weeks after the first day of each menstrual cycle, so the timing of the pain makes mittelschmerz easy to recognize. To help determine if your pain is related to ovulation, your doctor may ask you to chart your menstrual cycles, noting any episodes of pain, as well as the location of the pain (the pain of mittelschmerz usually occurs on one side of your lower abdomen). Your doctor also may perform an abdominal and pelvic examination to help rule out other possible causes of pain, such as endometriosis or a cyst on your ovary. If your pain is severe or if the doctor notices any irregularities on the exam, he or she may order blood tests or X-rays to help determine the cause of your pain.

      How Is Mittelschmerz Treated?

      The pain usually goes away within about 24 hours, so specific treatment is not required. Over-the-counter pain medicines -- such as Aleve (naproxen) or Motrin (ibuprofen) -- generally are effective in relieving mittelschmerz. Applying a heating pad to the lower abdomen or taking a warm bath may also help with the discomfort. Women with particularly painful ovulation may find relief by taking birth control pills, which prevent ovulation.

      Can Mittelschmerz Be Prevented?

      Preventing ovulation, which can be done with birth control pills, is the only way to effectively prevent mittelschmerz.

      When Should I Call My Doctor?

      Call your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms during ovulation:

      Fever
      Pain with urination
      Redness or burning of the skin at the site of the pain
      Vomiting
      Mid-cycle pain lasting longer than a day
      You should also call your doctor if you missed your last menstrual period.

  39. QUESTION:
    Cancer Question?
    My mother came back from a medical exam and said they found a "sis" ? I think that's what they said it was. I most likely butchered the way "sis" is spelled, but what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      What are ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled, sac-like structures within an ovary. The term cyst refers to a fluid-filled structure. Therefore, all ovarian cysts contain at least some fluid.

      What causes ovarian cysts?
      Ovarian cysts form for numerous reasons. The most common type is a follicular cyst, which results from the growth of a follicle. A follicle is the normal fluid-filled sac that contains an egg. Follicular cysts form when the follicle grows larger than normal during the menstrual cycle and does not open to release the egg. Usually, follicular cysts resolve on their own over the course of days to months. Cysts can contain blood (hemorrhagic or endometrioid cysts) from injury or leakage of tiny blood vessels into the egg sac. Occasionally, the tissues of the ovary develop abnormally to form other body tissues such as hair or teeth. Cysts with these abnormal tissues are called dermoid cysts.

      What symptoms are caused by ovarian cysts?
      Most cysts are never noticed and resolve without women ever realizing that they are there. When a cyst causes symptoms, pain in the belly or pelvis is by far the most common one. The pain can be caused from rupture of the cyst, rapid growth and stretching, bleeding into the cyst, or twisting of the cyst around its blood supply.

      How are ovarian cysts diagnosed?
      Most cysts are diagnosed by ultrasound, which is the best imaging technique for detecting ovarian cysts. Ultrasound is an imaging method that uses sound waves to produce an image of structures within the body. Ultrasound imaging is painless and causes no harm.

      Cysts can also be detected with other imaging methods, such as CAT scan or MRI scan (magnetic resonance imaging).

  40. QUESTION:
    Ugh.... gross.... discharge question?
    Okay so today i was using the restroom and i looked down to wipe.... and there was a string of something gooey from my vagina to the toilet water!!! it was clearish/tint of yellowish and i haven't started my period yet.... ugh what is this and how do i stop it?!?!!??!

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when a woman is sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  41. QUESTION:
    what could this be/strange discharge question?
    I have been having a small partical amount of semi hard fleshy dishcage that i notice only sometimes when i wipe after peeing. It's a small "chunk" of a pinkish semi hard (something) I have no idea what this could be? I have the mirena implant and have never hasd any issues due to it.I have not had any bleeding...

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside a girl/woman s vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when a woman is sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  42. QUESTION:
    Abnormal Discharge Question;?
    Quick Question:
    When I use the facilities, I noticed that my discharge is a solid white color. It sticks together, creating tiny white dots. Tiny in size, but really noticable. It just started happening like a week ago.

    I was wondering if that was normal?
    and exactly what it is?
    Could I still have sex?

    Feedback would be great, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear, white or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when you're sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor.

      Good luck :)

  43. QUESTION:
    question about pinching from my ovaries?
    Ok well my peroid was Feb 27th now i know i am going to ovulate somewhere between tonight and sunday. but right now as we speak I am having almost pinching feeling in the area where my ovaries are. my cycle is usually 29-30 days average but last month AF came two days early??? so what i am wondering could i be ovulating right now with these little pinching feelings i am getting right now?

    • ANSWER:
      You could be ovulating now or your ovaries could be gearing up to ovulate. Do you use OPKs ? Have you noticed any watery or egg white cervical fluid ? Those can be fertile signs. If you are TTC I would have sex everyday for the next few days in case you are about to Ovulate.

  44. QUESTION:
    OBGYN Question...?
    I have not had a menstral cycle since 2-2-06. I am not pregnant and yes i have had blood tests to confirm. Prior to febuary i had a cycle every 4-5 months very heavy, i have not had one in a while, my breast hurt and it look like i have milk ducts again ( the white on the nipples) My child was born 3 1/2 years ago- is this normal since he was a c section delivery- what could be my problem besides being overweight?

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry your body is going loopy, mine is too. OK like a few people said; it may be PCOS (poly-cystic ovarian syndrome). I have it unfortunately. It prevents you from becoming pregnant,or is more difficult to try and conceive a child. But luckily you already have a child. (I'm trying to have 1.) I'm not a DR. either. So you should go get checked also.

      They are still trying to find a cure for PCOS; however it is treatable. They don't know if its genetic or hereditary. Also don't know how to prevent it, you can get it at any age. Luckily you Won't die from it; its just a pain in the f-ing a$$ or ovaries!!!
      HOW IT AFFECTS YOUR OVARIES; Your ovaries have a bunch of little places or slits in them for your eggs, until they are to be released into your uterus. Well with PCOS; u don't have that, there are fluid filled sacs that take place off where your eggs would be. If you were to see this on an ultrasound, it looks like a bunch of pearls in your ovaries. This makes your ovaries bigger than what they are supposed to be. If the sacs pop; they feel like cramps (may happen for a couple secs. or a couple mins.) The fluid in the sacs is not harmful/toxic like some fluid in your body.

      SYMPTOMS: PCOS causes you to gain weight, especially in the mid section. If you start to exercise and eat more healthy it will slow down the weight gain. The reason you gain weight is because the symptoms are type 2 diabetes. weather u have it or not. It acts like that. Like you body can't process the sugars, and it just floats around in you body; so it has no where else to go but your mid section. Which causes the weight gain in the middle. You may also get noticing you hair falling out more or its getting thinner. Unfortunately you will notice that you are growing hair other places or it is getting darker; places like facial area (upper lip), on your breasts. The knuckles of your hands and/or feet. Right below your belly button or happy trail. Basically any where guys usually grow hair, and where they loose it too.

      TREATMENT: They will first put you on Progesterone which will induce a period. After that you will be put on Metformin; which will try to reduce some of the symptoms and try to make the condition less difficult to become pregnant. There is another way to get rid of the fluid filled sacs. They go inside your ovaries and zap it with a laser. Unfortunately its only good for 3 months. Also you can reduce your symptoms by doing a lot of cardio, eating better, & just try and live life healthier.

      Make sure you got see a DR. before it gets worse and it can.
      Hope this helpes. PLUS you can google PCOS or use a search engine on it and you will get more details. Try the MayoClinic.com and type in PCOS it should give you a lot more Info.

  45. QUESTION:
    How do I found out answer to my question?
    In two weeks I have a growth that went from 2cm to 4cm on left ovary, ca125 neg. Still worried as to why and what it is and what kind of things can grow so fast on your ovary? Can it be cyst or tumor, waiting to see gyno Friday and I'm nervous and my left lymph node swollen and all blood work shows no infection. Anyone with similar or knowledge to this kind of issue with any answers would be helpful thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like a cyst. Cysts are filled with fluid, and the fluid can be produced quickly by the body and therefore grow quickly. If it were a tumor (or cancer), then it would likely have a lot more solid components, and they can't grow nearly that fast, even though they do grow fast. They don't double in 2 weeks. So it's probably just a simple, fluid-filled cyst that they may remove or it might go away on its own.

  46. QUESTION:
    Women with Polycystic Ovaries...?
    Repost as no response :(

    How many children (if any) do you have? If no children have you ttc? How long? Did you find out before or after birth? What age were you when you were diagnosed? Would you have considered yourself overweight or obese at the time? Did you develop diabetes? What type if so?

    Apologies for all the questions I'm just interested as I'm 24, I've had 2 kids, I'm now classed as overweight and I was at the doctor yesterday about a missed period and from all different scenario's Polycystic Ovaries seemed to be the cause.. doing bloods etc Wed so will know soon enough. I just want to know how this has affected your life etc. AND just for the future as to what my chances are of having another baby at some stage. Thanks in advance 10 points to best answer!

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, try not to panic... many women have multiple fluid filled cysts in their ovaries, but the majority of these women DO NOT have PCOS... PCOS is associated with the imbalance of sex hormones... Your doctor will have taken blood (on wednesday) to test the level of testosterone in your body (male sex hormone) - dependant on the level of this, there is a chance of reduced fertility... however, this doesn't mean you're not going to be able to concieve, and the chances are that you shouldn't have too much of a fertility issue being as you've already had 2 previous pregnancies (although I'm not suggesting it may not take longer to concieve, due to the chances of infrequent ovulation). Sufferers of PCOS still have children! it's a common misconception that PCOS = No Babies... I've seen many a patient with PCOS concieve and carry to term.

      The biggest thing I have noticed in patients, that seem to have the 'greatest' effect (other than for those who are not able to concieve at all) are the 'noticable' symptoms of the syndrome, such as virilization (excessive hair growth, usually to the abdomen, around the nipples and on the face), long-lasting acne, and sometimes thinning hair on the head.

      PCOS is known to increase insulin resistance (hence why many PCOS sufferers are overweight), so there is a risk, should you be diagnosed with PCOS of you developing Diabetes Mellitus (in answer to your question, it would be type II), but as I've said previously - try not to worry.

      It's important for you to realise that there are other causes for amenorrhoea (missed periods) other than PCOS, for example, if you're stressed, if all of a sudden you're doing excessive exercise, depression, (you say you have 2 children, have you not long given birth? or are you breast feeding?... this could also be a cause) maybe you're coming off the contraceptive pill?...there is quite a list.

      I know this isn't an ideal answer for you, but I do hope it will put your mind at ease slightly. PCOS isn't the end of the world, or the end of your chances to expand your family... it could even be a false alarm!

  47. QUESTION:
    discharge question?
    i have this jelly like and smelly discharge stuff that i get all the time...how can i get rid of this? please no doctor cause my mom must come with me being 14 and i can not handle the embarassment. im making up a big lie to my boyfriend so he keeps away from there for now (lol!). is there any over the counter or home remedies that i can do? can this ruin my chances of having kids? help! please no comments and just help me with what im asking =).

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when a woman is sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  48. QUESTION:
    Discharge question?
    I had this thick white discharge that kinda looks like the white stuff in an chicken egg. Could this mean that im getting my period soon? Because i have had like clear discharge for a long time before.

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when you're sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  49. QUESTION:
    Discharge question...?
    I discharge pretty bad sometimes and I used to get scared that I had a yeast infection or some type of bacteria infection, but it never had an odor or color. So, I was on birth control to help control my discharge and it helped, but now I am not on birth control and my discharge is coming back. I just wanted to know if this is common amongst other females, because my gyno made a comment that mine is thicker than usual, but she didnt say it was bad or good and I cant find info online other than yeast infection and other stuff. Anyone have advise on why I discharge so much and why its thick? sometimes I have to change underwear at least 3x a day.
    Just to clerify..I discharge all the time, not just before or after my period. Its alll the time, the only time it stops is when I am actually on my period.

    • ANSWER:
      Glands inside your vagina and cervix make small amounts of fluid. This fluid flows out of the vagina each day, carrying out old cells that have lined the vagina. This is your body's way of keeping your vagina healthy and clean. The discharge is usually clear or milky and doesn't smell bad.

      The color and thickness of the discharge change with your monthly cycle. The discharge is thicker when you ovulate (when one of your ovaries releases an egg), when a woman is breastfeeding or when you're sexually excited.

      Changes that may signal a problem include an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of the discharge, and irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina. This is called vaginitis. A discharge that's stained with blood when you're not having your period could also be a sign of a problem. Some other types of infections such as yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis can also cause discharge that is usually accompanied by odor such as beer/yeast/fish.

      I would recommend that if you have any of these signs or any concerns regarding this you consult with your doctor for a proper diagnosis and for proper treatment should you have anything other than just a normal vaginal discharge.

      Good luck :)

  50. QUESTION:
    ovary opation???
    hey its kinda urgent i am freaking out here :S:S my girl friend had stomach pain from couple of weeks che saw a dr he toled her that their is a bag of something in thier and its need to be removed as long as her ovary and i am a lil freaking out should i get worried ?? is it a major operation or its nothing should i be afraid ??

    • ANSWER:
      Your girlfriend's doctor was probably talking about a cyst on her ovary. Typically, ovarian cysts are functional (not disease related) and occur as a normal process of ovulation. During the days before ovulation, a follicle grows. But at the time of expected ovulation, the follicle fails to break open and release an egg, as it is supposed to. Instead, the fluid within the follicle remains and forms a cyst.

      Functional, or physiological, ovarian cysts usually disappear within 8 - 12 weeks without treatment. They are relatively common, and are more common during a woman's childbearing years (puberty to menopause). Ovarian cysts are rare after menopause.

      Functional ovarian cysts are not the same as ovarian tumors (including ovarian cancer) or cysts due to hormone-related conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease. Some non-functional ovarian cysts must be treated to go away.

      An ovarian cyst can cause pain if it pushes on nearby structures, ruptures or bleeds. Pain may also occur if the cyst is twisted or causes twisting (torsion) of the fallopian tube.

      Symptoms of ovarian cysts can include:

      * Pelvic pain - constant, dull aching
      * Pain with intercourse or pelvic pain during movement
      * Pain during bowel movements
      * Pelvic pain shortly after beginning or ending a menstrual period
      * Abnormal uterine bleeding (change from normal menstrual pattern)
      * Longer than usual menstrual cycle
      * Shorter than usual menstrual cycle
      * Absent menstruation
      * Irregular menstruation
      * Abdominal bloating or swelling

      Often no symptoms are noted and ovarian cysts are found only be routine examinations.

      Functional ovarian cysts usually go away without treatment. Usually birth control pills may be prescribed to help establish normal cycles and decrease the development of functional ovarian cysts.

      Simple ovarian cysts that are larger than 5-10 centimeters and complex ovarian cysts that persist should and will usually be surgically removed via laparoscopy (minimal invasive surgery).

      I would recommend that your girl friend speak with her doctor/gyno about this and ask them to answer any questions or concerns she has.

      I have suffered from many bilateral ovarian cysts over the past 9 years and have surgery 2 times to have them removed (it wasn't anything too serious).

      I hope this helps ease your mind a little bit. Good luck :)


fluid on ovary questions