Cyst After Removal Wisdom Teeth

When it comes to dentistry there are many procedures and treatments involved. In this article, we're going to touch on wisdom teeth only. Wisdom teeth have been a concern for centuries. Almost everyone needs to have them extracted at some time in their lives because wisdom teeth have a tendency to become compacted.

Usually, wisdom teeth extraction generally requires the services of an oral surgeon. Oral surgery is usually done through referral services because most dentists are not oral surgeons. Wisdom teeth only require wisdom teeth specialists. Utah towns such as Provo and Salt Lake City have excellent referral services.

Most of us don't even know what wisdom teeth are. The third and fourth molars are what we consider wisdom teeth and as I said earlier they usually need to be extracted between the ages of 17 and 25 because the become impacted. When they're impacted it means they are coming in sideways. If wisdom teeth come in sideways they normally affect the positioning of the other teeth. What I didn't know until I researched wisdom teeth only is that wisdom teeth don't develop in 35% of the population.

Even if wisdom teeth grow in properly they can cause problems which then, of course requires oral surgery. Even after they have grown in food can be trapped in the jaw behind the teeth. Trapped food particles can cause infections. I've had infections before. They can be become very irritable and painful.

After wisdom teeth removal improper hygiene and care can create infections and serious pain too. Among other things, dry socket is common, although, sometimes it develops for unknown reasons, but most for improper care. Dry socket is when pressure changes in the mouth and dislodges the blood clots form the extraction site. It can be very painful.

When I think back on when my wisdom teeth were extracted, I got away with no infections even though I was negligent in following the doctors counsel on care of my teeth. I got lazy and thought I was invincible. At that time, I must have been because I suffered no consequences of poor care to my teeth. Although, oral surgery wasn't pleasant my healing process was without incident. Such is the wisdom of youth. The problem was I was about 23 when I had them removed.

Another factoid I didn't know until after I studied wisdom teeth only is the controversy surrounding the extraction of wisdom teeth. Some studies have shown that leaving the molars in have not resulted in medical and dental problems. In fact one study resulted in "extraction is likely to be ineffective and harmful." Opponents claim that studies are ineffective because of the length of time necessary for study and the lack of controlled follow up.

The argument is that too many dentist are extracting wisdom teeth for purely financial gain. I can only speak from personal experience. My third and fourth molars created painful problems for me. The dentist was careful to make the right analysis. Was wisdom tooth removal necessary? I believe he made the right analysis. He made a good dentist referral through the reliable referral services. Everything turned out well. I never had any recurring problems and my experience with wisdom teeth removal was pleasant one. It' good to get your information right before extracting your wisdom teeth. I hope you have as good experience as I have.

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    wisdom teeth?
    they dont hurt but their in my left up gums and i can feel it what do i do? am i suppose to have these??

    • ANSWER:
      getting sedated is a great way to get them out, you won't remember a thing! I recommend taking an ibuprofen before you get sedated this will help with swelling later. just use only enough water to swallow the pills b/c you are not to have anything to eat or drink after midnight the night before.

      go to the grocery and stock up on soft cool food, mashed potatoes, soups, ice cream, yogurt, apple sauce, grits, eggs, (slim fast or ensure if you feel you can't eat!!) pudding, etc...think easy to swallow and soft!

      wear comfortable clothing because you will still be really groggy after the surgery. I went home and went back to sleep. I woke up and had some soup and a pain pill and went back to sleep again!!! but everyone is different.

      after they are removed, you will be numb for quite sometime. ONLY eat soft cool food while you are numb. (ice cream, apple sauce, mashed potatoes, milkshake (WITH A SPOON do not suck through a straw), yogurt, etc. things like that. after the numbness wears off you will be able to eat warm foods again...just nothing hard or crunchy.

      you will be given pain pills and i would taken them with an ibuprofen to reduce swelling, pain pills ONLY work on pain, not swelling. you will use ice pack 15 minutes on each side for the 1st day, after that you can use heat packs if you feel you need it. NO swishing or spitting, or smoking the first 24 hours!!!! this will cause a dry socket.

      They will be sore!!!!!! make sure to do warm salt water rinses as this helps it to heal faster and keeps it clean. Please be sure to eat even if you do not feel like it, taking pain pills on an empty stomach will cause you to throw up. you should be able to eat whatever you can tolerate the day or so after. it really depends on you, some people can't eat a burger the next day, others can. if you are still really sore stick to soft foods.....in a few days you will be able to eat whatever you want. just please stay away from hard, crunchy things. they will go over all the instructions with you at the DRs office.

      good luck and rent some movies, lay in bed and relax.

      Top 10 reasons to remove wisdom teeth:

      10. Because there is limited space for wisdom teeth to erupt and because the surrounding gums are difficult to keep clean. Infection and inflammation are therefore common even when there are no apparent symptoms.

      9. Even when wisdom teeth erupt through the gum tissues, they rarely provide any meaningful function and are always difficult to keep clean.

      8. Wisdom teeth have high risk of getting cavities on them because they are very hard to clean while brushing and flossing.

      7. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth develop cysts, and rarely tumours. Removal of such lesions may require extensive procedures to repair and restore jaw function and appearance.

      6. With age, the chance for complications related to the removal of wisdom teeth increases.

      5. Gum disease and inflammation associated with wisdom teeth may lead to receding gum tissues, deterioration of the jawbone and tooth loss.

      4. Wisdom teeth may contribute to crowding of nearby teeth.

      3. Even wisdom teeth that seem to be problem-free remain a breeding ground for oral infection and inflammation. Research supports the concept that such inflammation may enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development and/or progression of a variety of diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

      2. Once it has been determined that a wisdom tooth will not successfully erupt into your mouth and be maintained in a healthy state, early extraction of wisdom teeth is associated with faster and easier recovery.

      1. The number one reason for removing wisdom teeth: Peace of mind!

      Source: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  2. QUESTION:
    wisdom teeth?
    i recently found out that two of my wisdom teeth have came in and i have to get them taken out so they dont screw up my teeth after from having braces.

    does it hurt to have your wisdom teeth taken out? and does it also hurt after the procedure is done? what are some of things that will happen?

    when my wisdom teeth have came in i mean they have came through the gums, not just formed beneath the gums.

    • ANSWER:
      getting sedated is a great way to get them out, you won't remember a thing! I recommend taking an ibuprofen before you get sedated this will help with swelling later. just use only enough water to swallow the pills b/c you are not to have anything to eat or drink after midnight the night before.

      go to the grocery and stock up on soft cool food, mashed potatoes, soups, ice cream, yogurt, apple sauce, grits, eggs, (slim fast or ensure if you feel you can't eat!!) pudding, etc...think easy to swallow and soft!

      wear comfortable clothing because you will still be really groggy after the surgery. I went home and went back to sleep. I woke up and had some soup and a pain pill and went back to sleep again!!! but everyone is different.

      after they are removed, you will be numb for quite sometime. ONLY eat soft cool food while you are numb. (ice cream, apple sauce, mashed potatoes, milkshake (WITH A SPOON do not suck through a straw), yogurt, etc. things like that. after the numbness wears off you will be able to eat warm foods again...just nothing hard or crunchy.

      you will be given pain pills and i would taken them with an ibuprofen to reduce swelling, pain pills ONLY work on pain, not swelling. you will use ice pack 15 minutes on each side for the 1st day, after that you can use heat packs if you feel you need it. NO swishing or spitting, or smoking the first 24 hours!!!! this will cause a dry socket.

      They will be sore!!!!!! make sure to do warm salt water rinses as this helps it to heal faster and keeps it clean. Please be sure to eat even if you do not feel like it, taking pain pills on an empty stomach will cause you to throw up. you should be able to eat whatever you can tolerate the day or so after. it really depends on you, some people can't eat a burger the next day, others can. if you are still really sore stick to soft foods.....in a few days you will be able to eat whatever you want. just please stay away from hard, crunchy things. they will go over all the instructions with you at the DRs office.

      you will be given gauze to take home with you, if not you can pick some up at the grocery/pharmacy (4x4 gauze) you will fold it up and place one piece on each side over the "holes" bite down like you normally would, NOT forcefully!! this applies pressure and helps stop the bleeding. check the gauze in an hour when its saturated change it out with 2 new pieces of 4x4 gauze. check it again 1 hr later.. when the gauze gets to where its not saturated, its only spotted with blood... you are probably done bleeding...the site will ooze blood this is normal, but if they haven't or won't stop bleeding call your dr he may need to help out. this hardly ever happens. DO NOT keep putting in gauze and taking it out...sometimes it prevents the blood clot from clotting. if its not bleeding or even if its spotting do not put gauze back in there...now if for some reason it beginning to bleed again then put some gauze back.

      *After your appointment, eat something, take a pain pill, go back to sleep. good luck and rent some movies, lay in bed and relax.

      I found this on a website:

      Top 10 reasons to remove wisdom teeth:

      10. Because there is limited space for wisdom teeth to erupt and because the surrounding gums are difficult to keep clean. Infection and inflammation are therefore common even when there are no apparent symptoms.

      9. Even when wisdom teeth erupt through the gum tissues, they rarely provide any meaningful function and are always difficult to keep clean.

      8. Wisdom teeth have high risk of getting cavities on them because they are very hard to clean while brushing and flossing.

      7. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth develop cysts, and rarely tumors. Removal of such lesions may require extensive procedures to repair and restore jaw function and appearance.

      6. With age, the chance for complications related to the removal of wisdom teeth increases.

      5. Gum disease and inflammation associated with wisdom teeth may lead to receding gum tissues, deterioration of the jawbone and tooth loss.

      4. Wisdom teeth may contribute to crowding of nearby teeth.

      3. Even wisdom teeth that seem to be problem-free remain a breeding ground for oral infection and inflammation. Research supports the concept that such inflammation may enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development and/or progression of a variety of diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

      2. Once it has been determined that a wisdom tooth will not successfully erupt into your mouth and be maintained in a healthy state, early extraction of wisdom teeth is associated with faster and easier recovery.

      1. The number one reason for removing wisdom teeth: Peace of mind!

      Source: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  3. QUESTION:
    Wisdom tooth question?
    So I have a wisdom tooth coming down..
    It's been coming down for a good few weeks but hasn't started to hurt until recently.
    I'm gonna make an app. with my dentist, but if I do have to get it out I have a few questions...

    It's still hasn't erupted through the gum yet, can he still remove it?
    Will it hurt more because of this?
    Will they put me to sleep even though it's only one tooth? (I'm hoping they will)
    Now that I have one coming down, does that mean the other three will come down? Or could it just be one.

    Any advice is appreciated, thanks! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Wisdom tooth removal is a rite of passage for most youth today, and for good reason.

      There is usually not enough room in your mouth for the teeth, this can lead to partial eruption, impaction, cyst development, periodontal disease, decay, pain and tooth loss. As you age the roots grow longer and when fully developed can impinge on important structures in you face making removal difficult.

      Let me get to your questions.

      An unerupted wisdom tooth is sometimes EASIER to remove than a fully developed, erupted tooth.

      You should feel no discomfort when having the tooth removed. I always suggest my patients get "put to sleep" to have the wisdom teeth removed. It makes it easier for you and the surgeon. After extraction you will have some post-op soreness, not a big deal. It will not be significantly worse if the tooth is not erupted. (BTW...just to point out...you are in pain now...so how much worse can it get?)

      When having one wisdom tooth removed I usually don't recommend getting "put to sleep" unless the patient specifically requests. HOWEVER, I usually recommend having all wisdom teeth removed at the same time AND getting "put to sleep". Why undergo potentially 4 procedures when you can get it all done in one?

      There is no way to know if the other teeth will erupt or stay put. Talk to your Dentist and Oral Surgeon and get their advice on the risks and benefits of removal.

      If you are feeling anxious about the procedure ask them about any anti-anxiety medication prior to the appointment, this can help to take the edge off.

      Remember, MILLIONS of people have their wisdom teeth removed every year...it's not that big of a deal, just something we all have to do.

      Good Luck.

      Dr. Saydyk

  4. QUESTION:
    Wisdom tooth and Dentigerous cyst removal?
    Well finally thought I was done with all my orthodontestry, was told early on I probably wouldn't need my wisdom teeth pulled and that once my braces were off all I would have left was my retainer.

    Well surprise surprise, the reason that one of my wisdom teeth were not erupting is because there is apparently a Dentigerous cyst under/around it after my latest x-rays. Now I apparently need to get them out.

    I haven't met with my dentist yet but I would rather not be put under anesthesia. I am deathly afraid of it as this would be my first "major" (its really minor surgery) surgery and have had no experience with it. To put it quite frankly, I am not the luckiest person in the world and I am quite worried that I would be "aware" during the surgery. Not so much that I would feel pain but have the experience of suffocating which I have been told is fairly common with the muscle relaxers.

    I want to know if its possible to just shoot me up with a crapload of novocaine and if thats possible how painful it would be to remove the tooth and cyst.
    Well thats the thing, I don't think I can be just numbed in regards to the removal of the cyst.

    • ANSWER:
      The doc can get you super numb, no worries. You won't feel anything but some pressure. Not too difficult assuming your wisdom teeth are fully impacted and not erupted.

  5. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth and symptoms?
    What are some possible symptoms you can get when your wisdom teeth is breaking through? What did you do?

    • ANSWER:
      Pain ,swelling,dental caries,cyst and tumors can be associted symptoms of wisdom teeth.

      if any of these problems occur,go to a oral surgeon and get it removed.

      two views regarding removal of wisdom teeth

      some advocate prophylactic removal of wisdom teeth since most of them are impacted and cant be saved and also associated with high incidence of pathologies.(cysts and tumors)

      others tell to remove ONLY when there is a need.removal of wisdom teeth can be justified in the following situations.

      when it is impacted and causing pain
      when it is associated with pain due to dental caries and cant be saved though not impacted.
      when associated with pathology such as cyst and tumors
      when the presence and position of wisdom teeth interferes with health status and treatment of second molar.
      when there is repeated occurrence of pericoronitis.
      sometimes due to orthodontic reasons.
      Due to temperomandibular joint problems(especially buccoverted maxillary third molars)

      i suggest you to remove your wisdom teeth only when there is a need.but if you suspect any pain or disturbance with wisdom teeth,visit your dentist or oral surgeon and have a follow up on the particular teeth.treatment can be done accordingly.

  6. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth pain from removal?
    Went to the dentist today and they said I need oral surgery to remove my wisdom teeth. I wanted to know how bad is pain? How long would I have to take off from school/work? What can/can't I eat? How long does it take to recovery? Any other necessary things I need to know??

    Best answer gets 10 pts asap

    • ANSWER:
      The amount of pain that you feel varies based on how impacted the teeth are (that is, how far they have emerged from the gum tissue), how smoothly the surgery goes, and your general reaction to anesthesia.

      My best advice is to ask to be put under for the surgery. My oral surgeon gave me numbing pads so that I didn't even feel the insertion of the needle in my arm. He also gave me laughing gas to calm me down, and before I knew it, I was waking up from the surgery.

      My advice would be to ask your oral surgeon to include a few drips of Gravol in your IV during the surgery. I find that this greatly reduces any nausea that you may feel from the anesthesia and/or blood in your mouth. It is also important that you fast, as recommended by your oral surgeon, before the surgery, as this will ensure that your stomach is empty. Get plenty of rest the night before and try to book a morning appointment so that you do not get a headache before surgery from fasting all day.

      I did not feel significant pain at all after my extraction, despite my tooth being impacted and surrounded by a cyst. I am allergic to codeine and demerol (two commonly prescribed pain relievers), so my doctor gave me a prescription for Motrin. When you first get home, you may feel perfectly fine - no pain at all - as many oral surgeons inject local anesthetic at the site of the extraction. It is VERY important to begin taking your medication right away, as this will give you a head-start for when the freezing begins to wear off.

      Your first day will be spent mostly sleeping off the anesthetic. It is important to change the gauze and alternate cool/warm compresses as your doctor recommends. I found that resting with your head slightly elevated from the rest of your body helps to slow the bleeding. Also, breathing through your nose causes you to generate less saliva, thus slowing the bleeding even more.

      I was fully recovered from my procedure within three days. I had my surgery on a Friday morning and returned to school with no problems on Monday morning. If anything, I found that the stitches were inconvenient and the swelling was unpleasant. My cheeks were very sensitive to the touch and I had noticeable yellow bruising around my lower jaw (nothing that a little liquid make-up can't cover though!). I did not experience any sort of extreme pain, other than when one of the sites became infected...but that's a whole other story, and very unlikely to happen to you if you avoid getting any debris at the extraction site and gurggle often with salt water.

      Foods that I found worked great (...some of these may sound bizarre):
      - soup (mostly broth for the first day, soft veggies/noodles on the second, third, etc.)
      - jello
      - pudding
      - applesauce
      - yogurt (no fruits with seeds - these can easily sneak into the extraction site)
      - mashed potatoes
      - donuts/timbits (For some reason, I found that Krispy Kremes were the best, as they almost melted in my mouth.)
      - soft cooked veggies (carrots work great)
      - pasta salads (noodles slide right down your throat)

      * NOTHING can be HOT or COLD. Everything you consume must be at room temperature.
      * NOTHING can be consumed through a straw.
      * AVOID dry, crumbly foods that do not stay contained in your mouth - i.e. crackers, chips, etc.

      Other things to remember:
      - DO NOT brush near the extraction site.
      - DO NOT swirl liquids violently around your mouth or spit with force. This can upset the blood clots.
      - DO NOT consume any COLD or WARM foods. Everything must be at room temperature.
      - DO NOT drink through a straw. This can also upset the clots.
      - DO NOT fiddle with the stitches with your tongue - although I know it's tempting! They are disolvable and will begin coming out (painlessly!) anywhere from the fourth day after the surgery to nearly two weeks after. Be patient!
      - DO gurggle with salt water starting around your second or third day. This prevents infection. Your oral surgeon may also give you a syringe to squirt Luke-warm water at the site. This is very helpful in preventing infections and removing debris as well.

      Anyhow, hope that gives you an idea of what to expect, at least the basics anyway! It's important to be comfortable with your oral surgeon so that you can ask him/her about any of your concerns beforehand. The oral surgeon may also provide you with some pamphlets to read up on.

      Just remember to keep a positive attitude. Having been through several oral surgeries, I know that being positive helps your recovery immensely! Know that many other young adults sympathize, but have also survived the experience. Best of luck - I'm sure you'll come through it just fine :D

  7. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had cyst removal surgery? This cyst formed from a wisdom tooth and is located in the sinus cavity.?
    Please tell me about your experience and recovery. How are you doing now?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had 2 cyst removals it took me a while to recover because i was a cheerleader and i was always doing builds when i wasn't supposed to recovery is the least of your worries where i went they hardly numbed my cyst so i felt everything hope i do not scare you have any questions send me a message...oh ya i am all beter now

  8. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth removal problem/question! ?
    I had my wisdom teeth removed 24 hours ago.. I came home applying the gauze for 30 minute periods throughout the night. The left side stopped bleeding but the right side still throughout the night. I know realize what I was doing.. removing the blood clot.. I remember the gauze with solid blood jelly on it. I just put a tea bag on the one that was clotting and then I decided I was done messing with the right side. Now I have a huge blot clot( jelly) on my right side that I'd very large and painful. I took more pain medications but its still there and when my tongue feels it it feels like the jelly is really loose. Please help! What did I do wrong what can I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to develop and appear in your mouth. ... As the cyst grows it may lead to more serious problems as it hollows out the ... In general, dental and medical professionals agree that wisdom teeth should be removed in the following instance

  9. QUESTION:
    still bleeding after wisdom teeth removal/cyst removal?
    On Thursday- I had my wisdom teeth removed (all 4, 1 impacted) and a cyst in my lower right side of my jaw...I'm still bleeding...not profusly but enough to the point that I need gauze constantly...I know painkillers and ibuprofen cause you to bleed more and I have dissolvable stiches as well but the fact is I'm still bleeding a good deal. I've been rinsing with salt water constantly (without spitting or agitating the wounds). Is this normal?

    I'm going to try to use tea bags tomorrow to stop the bleeding...
    just about every hour i change the gauze and rinse for about 10-15 minutes (very light rinse)

    I cant tell if im bleeding from the stiches from the cyst removed or my wisdom teeth...but from what I can tell based on the stiches from the cyst- thats where the majority of the bleeding is from...

    Also- the stitches are beginning to dissolve or fall out (they are supposed to) so could that be why im bleeding?
    I'm going to call my doctor tomorrow as well...

    • ANSWER:
      Stop all swishing. Try tea bags(wet) now. Tannic acid in the tea is a good coagulant. Also ,dry gauze can pull the top of the clot. I think it is the 10-15 minutes of rinses that is keeping you from clotting normally.

  10. QUESTION:
    cyst over wisdom tooth...need answers!?
    I have an impacted wisdom tooth with a little cyst over it according to the dentist. the dentist says its not an emergency but to see a oral surgeon for a consultation..ive had wisdom teeth and molars out wide awake with just novacaine but im scared.

    -should i get this out ASAP is this really bad?
    -have you been awake during your impacted teeth removal (what was your experience)

    • ANSWER:
      the dentist is spot on....its not an emergency but you should definetly visit a speacialist( oral and maxillofacial surgeon).
      most likely its a dentigerous cyst which is usually associated with unerupted, impacted or partially erupted teeth and more so with the third molars(wisdom teeth)...
      its not an emergency but also should be excavated (removed) as over a longer period of time it can lead to lots of complications like ameloblastoma formation, bone resorption, jaw fracture can also take place due to severe bone resorption...
      so heed the advise of the dentist and do get it checked OUT by a specialist.

  11. QUESTION:
    Infections 6 months after wisdom tooth removal?
    I had my impacted wisdom tooth taken out about 6 months ago. It wasn't causing me any problems but there was a cyst starting to form around it. A couple days after having it removed I developed dry socket. I was in serious pain every day for about 2 weeks. About a month after it finally started healing I noticed the area swelling up. Went back to the oral surgeon and he gave me penicillin which reduced the swelling. Again a couple of months after that the same thing happened. I went back and received more penicillin. For about 3 months now everything was fine. Now two days ago my mouth started swelling and it is tender to the touch. You can see the swelling just by looking at the side of my face. I have an appointment with my regular dentist tomorrow. I was just wondering if anyone else ever this kind of problem and what it could be. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      The wisdom tooth should be 100% healed after 6 months. I would suspect that the infection is coming from another tooth. You need to have a dentist check things out and possibly put you on some antibiotics. Good luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    how much for wisdom teeth removal?
    I had 2 wisdom teeth removed. So there were charges for 2 extrations. I also had a cyst in the gum on one- so there was a charge for that. Then, I had a full mouth xray, so charge for that. Then the "consultation fee" which is a load of shit, but charged for that. I believe that was it. The bill came to 0 for me! I have insurance. I did go out of network (charged in network prices though-but the maxium my insurance would pay is 0 for out of network). So, basically for 2 wisdom teeth removed, I was charged 50! What the heck is that?
    Ok, you're bill was about 00 for all 4. For me, they quoted me 00 (they wanted to do all 4 at once), but again, I HAVE INSURANCE. My real issue is with the insurance here. I pay every week from my paycheck just to have it- and trust me- I pay well over 0 a year for it. So 00+0 would be the 00. Why do we even have insurance?

    • ANSWER:
      The price was fair. What do you think you should have been charged, what the insurance company would pay? How much would a MD charge for removal of a cyst?

  13. QUESTION:
    My stiches popped out early after wisdom teeth removal and cyst removal.?
    Tuesday I had all four wisdom teeth removed. One of the wisdom teeth had a cyst around it. In order for my dentist to take out my cyst he cut into my cheek slightly. Well I popped the stitches out thursday and now I have a hole really close to where the tooth was but slightly on the cheek. I have no temperature, no infection or swelling. I am scared I will get food down in this hole. I have been swishing with salt water often and using oragel mouth wash-this is for minor surgery or mouth infections. What should I do, am I going to get a bad infection or will the hole close up?

    • ANSWER:
      The hole will eventually close up. Don't worry about it. The stitches were designed to be absorbed by the body and fall out. Mine fell out about 3 days after I got my wisdom teeth removed.

  14. QUESTION:
    stitches after upper wisdom tooth/ cyst removal?
    I have just had an upper wisdom tooth and cyst removed at the local hospital and the surgeon used dissolvable stitches. I have a habit of running my tongue along where the stitches are and I am quite worried about dislodging them. Have you ever heard of this happening and is it likely or not and what would happen if it did ?

    • ANSWER:
      It's natural with any wound or injury to the mouth, to worry it with your tongue. I'm sure you know it would be better if you could leave it alone, undisturbed to heal. The sutures should be capable of withstanding moderate 'exploration' and if one or more become dislodged the consequences depend very much on how long after surgery and how healed the wound. The longer the sutures remain in situ the better the chances of the wound healing without problems. Complications would arise if sutures became dislodged and the edges of the wound had healed without knitting together. In summary, it would be better if you could break the habit of running your tongue along them.

  15. QUESTION:
    has anyone ever had impacted wisdom teeth?
    my lymph nodes are swollen and have been for almost a week. im not getting sick because this is my only symptom. also, my back gums are sore and i feel like teeth maybe coming in...

    • ANSWER:
      Wisdom Teeth By the age of eighteen, the average adult has 32 teeth; 16 teeth on the top and 16 teeth on the bottom. Each tooth in the mouth has a specific name and function. The teeth in the front of the mouth (incisors, canine and bicuspid teeth) are ideal for grasping and biting food into smaller pieces. The back teeth or molar teeth are used to grind food up into a consistency suitable for swallowing.
      The average mouth is made to hold only 28 teeth. It can be painful when 32 teeth try to fit in a mouth that holds only 28 teeth. These four other teeth are your Third Molars, also known as "wisdom teeth."
      Wisdom teeth are the last teeth to erupt within the mouth. When they align properly and gum tissue is healthy, wisdom teeth do not have to be removed. Unfortunately, this does not generally happen. The extraction of wisdom teeth is necessary when they are prevented from properly erupting within the mouth. They may grow sideways, partially emerge from the gum and even remain trapped beneath the gum and bone. Impacted teeth can take many positions in the bone as they attempt to find a pathway that will allow them to erupt successfully.
      These poorly positioned impacted teeth can cause many problems. When they are partially erupted, the opening around the tooth allows bacteria to grow and will eventually cause an infection. The result: swelling, stiffness, pain and illness. The pressure from the erupting wisdom tooth may move other teeth and disrupt the orthodontic or natural alignment of teeth. The most serious problem occurs when tumors or cysts form around the impacted wisdom tooth, resulting in the destruction of the jawbone and healthy teeth. Removal of the offending impacted tooth or teeth usually resolves these problems. Early removal is recommended to avoid such future problems and to decrease the surgical risk involved with the procedure.
      In most cases, the removal of wisdom teeth is performed under local anesthesia, laughing gas (nitrous oxide/oxygen analgesia) or general anesthesia. These options as well as the surgical risks (i.e. sensory nerve danger, sinus complications) will be discussed with you before the procedure is performed. Once the teeth are removed, the gum is sutured. To help control bleeding, bite down on the gauze placed in your mouth. You will rest under our supervision in the office until you are ready to be taken home. Upon discharge, your post-operative kit will include postoperative instructions, a prescription for pain medication, antibiotics and a follow-up appointment in one week for suture removal.

      I hope this information is helpfully, you should try to find a good oral surgeon to get your wisdom teeth extracted!

  16. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of wisdom teeth growing in sideways?
    My husbands wisdom tooth is doing this and he has to have oral surgery to have the tooth removed. The x-ray showed the tooth growing in sideway and there are a lot of nerves in the jaw. If you heard or know about this how long does it take to remove the tooth and healing time and how common is this?

    • ANSWER:
      A wisdom tooth extraction is usually done because most patients don't have enough room for a wisdom tooth. Humans have four wisdom teeth, one at each of the four ends of the mouth. Of the 32 teeth, it is the last in the tooth eruption sequence to come into the mouth. By the time the tooth comes in most of the room in the mouth is usually taken and the wisdom tooth doesn't fit. This causes a number of wisdom tooth problems.

      Because of the limited space, a wisdom tooth can grow sideways or become trapped under the gums. When it partially erupts into the mouth, it can form a pouch that traps food. The trapped food can cause tooth decay and the second molar in front of the wisdom tooth can also become decayed. If the gums become infected, it can cause wisdom tooth swelling, wisdom tooth pain, wisdom tooth headache and a bad odor. When any wisdom tooth symptom occurs, it is very important to have your wisdom tooth removed. If the infection is left untreated it can continue around the wisdom tooth and cause facial swelling that can prevent the patient's mouth from opening.

      The pressure from a wisdom tooth trying to get into the mouth can cause the rest of the teeth to move out of place. This is why most orthodontic patients have third molar extractions after getting their braces off. Early wisdom tooth surgery may even avoid the need for orthodontic care. When a wisdom tooth is badly trapped inside the jaw bone,a cyst can form around the wisdom tooth. Dental wisdom tooth cysts can grow and push teeth out of their way. In some rare cases, a cyst can form a tumor. This is a good reason for having wisdom tooth removing performed early.

      A wisdom tooth is also called a third molar and a dentist may call a wisdom tooth surgery a third molar surgery. Wisdom tooth problems can develop without any pain, however, most patients seek dental services for wisdom tooth pain relief.

      Dentists provide patients with most oral surgery services including routine extractions and impacted wisdom tooth removal. An impacted wisdom tooth picture can often help patients understand the need for removal. Most wisdom tooth surgery procedures go very well, take less than an hour and are done in our office to reduce the wisdom tooth extraction cost. Our dentists will see wisdom tooth emergency patients.

      The wisdom tooth extraction procedure

      The wisdom tooth extraction procedure is simple. Some patient's having extractions choose to have nitrous oxide ( laughing gas ) to help relax before numbing. The wisdom tooth removal surgery patient is seated and completely numbed. It's important to wait and allow the numbness to sink in fully. The dentist checks the depth of anesthesia by making a small incision around the wisdom tooth. Once it is confirmed that the patient is completely numb, the incision is lengthened and the gum tissue is gently pulled away from the wisdom tooth. If any of the surrounding bone is in the way, it is then removed. If needed, the tooth is then gently sectioned into pieces and the pieces are removed. Finally, sutures ( stitches ) are placed so that the gum tissue lays back into place correctly.

      The dentists believe that most oral surgery patients should be placed on antibiotics after surgery. All surgery patients are seen one week after their procedure and no additional fee is charged for this visit.

      Possible Complications of Wisdom Tooth Extraction

      Fortunately, most wisdom tooth extractions go well with few wisdom tooth extraction complications. The most common problems are pain and swelling in the area of the impacted wisdom tooth extraction. This can be kept to a minimum by good wisdom tooth removal care and by taking pain medications, applying cold to the surgical area immediately after the wisdom tooth removal and moist heat several hours later. Some patients bleed for up to 24 hours after the oral surgery. However, in healthy patients this is not usually a problem.

      A dry socket can be a complication of third molar extractions. Dentists are not sure why a wisdom tooth dry socket happens but the pain from a dry socket normally begins about three days after the wisdom tooth pulling procedure and lasts about one week. Perhaps the most feared possible complication is temporary or permanent numbness after extraction. The roots of a wisdom tooth can wrap around the nerve that carries feeling to the lip and chin.

      Complications from extractions increase as a patient gets older. The experience of getting a wisdom tooth pulled is easier for young people and this is the best time to remove a wisdom tooth because young patients are healthy and heal quickly. When wisdom tooth extractions are done early it avoids all of the possible future complications.

      Avoiding wisdom tooth problems

      A wisdom tooth problem can interfere with your life. Fighter pilots and submariners routinely have all their wisdom teeth removed to avoid any potential problems that may interfere with their duties. If you travel, an infected wisdom tooth can disrupt your trip and avoiding treatment can significantly increase you wisdom tooth cost.

      Even when a wisdom tooth manages to get into the mouth, it is very difficult to get all the way back in the mouth to clean it. This can cause cavities, periodontal disease or a wisdom tooth infection around the third molar and neighboring teeth. A wisdom tooth picture gives an idea of this problem.

      Some patients having a wisdom tooth removal choose to have nitrous oxide ( laughing gas ) administered to help relax before being numbed. The wisdom tooth removal patient is seated and completely numbed. It's important to wait and allow the numbness to sink in fully. The dentist checks the depth of the anesthesia by making a small incision around the tooth. Once it is confirmed that the patient is completely numb, the incision is lengthened and the gum tissue is gently pulled away from the wisdom tooth. If any of the surrounding bone is in the way, it is then removed. If needed, the wisdom tooth is then gently sectioned into pieces and the pieces are then removed. Finally, sutures ( stitches ) are placed so that the gum tissue lays back into place correctly. The dentists at the Atlanta Dental Group,PC believe that most patients should be placed on antibiotics after oral surgery. All patients are then seen post operatively one week after their oral surgery procedure and there is no additional fee for this visit if it's solely to check the surgery site.

      Fortunately a wisdom tooth removal usually goes well with few complications. The most common problems are pain and swelling in the area of the wisdom tooth removal. This can be kept to a minimum by taking pain medications, applying cold to the surgical area immediately after the wisdom tooth extraction and moist heat several hours later. Some patients bleed for up to 24 hours after the wisdom tooth removal. However, in healthy patients this is not usually a problem.

      A dry socket can be a complication. Dentists are not sure why a dry socket happens but the pain from a dry socket normally begins about 3 days after the oral surgery and lasts about one week. Perhaps the most feared complication is possible temporary or permanent numbness after the wisdom tooth removal. The roots of some wisdom teeth can wrap around the nerve that carries feeling to a patient's lip and chin.

      Complications from a wisdom tooth removal increase as a patient gets older. The experience is relatively easy for young people and this is the best time to have a wisdom tooth removal because young patients are healthy and heal quickly. When a wisdom tooth removal is done early, it avoids all of the possible future complications for a patient.

      A wisdom tooth problem can interfere with your life. Fighter pilots and submariners routinely have them removed to avoid any potential problems that may interfere with duties. If you travel, a dental problem can disrupt your trip. Even when a tooth manages to get into the mouth, it's very difficult for a patient to clean all the way back in the mouth. This cause cavities and periodontal disease around the wisdom tooth and its neighboring teeth.

      Wisdom tooth extraction is surgery and is commonly covered by most traditional dental insurance carriers at 80%. Some medical insurance policies also cover oral surgery. If you are concerned if your insurance covers your oral surgery, it's a good idea to visit for a consultation and panorex x-ray. Having the panorex x-ray allows dentists to create an estimate for your wisdom tooth removal. This estimate can then be sent to your insurance for a pre-estimate of payment.

      Also, my fiance and his sister are dentist they recommended i give you this info:

      What's so smart about teeth that only cause trouble? "Wisdom teeth" may seem like a misnomer, especially since people often have to have them removed. But these teeth -- also known as third molars -- usually arrive in the late teen years, a time traditionally seen as the passage to adulthood and an age of wisdom, hence the optimistic name.

      The main problem is that wisdom teeth usually try to grow into a jaw that's too small for them. The last teeth in the jawline, they often grow in sideways, pushing against teeth that are already in place and minding their own business. Because wisdom teeth are difficult to clean, there may be a build-up of bacteria, plaque, and food debris around them -- something that can cause gum disease or decay in the wisdom tooth and other molars.

      Why do we even have wisdom teeth?

      Dentists say wisdom teeth are apparently a vestigial organ -- that is, one that isn't very useful now but played an important role in the body in eons past. The diets of our prehistoric ancestors contained much more coarse food, which resulted in a larger, more developed jaw with more room for third molars. People also used to lose more permanent teeth at an early age, leaving space for wisdom teeth that would serve as replacements.

      "Some say wisdom teeth are like spare tires," says Dr. Louis Rafetto, a Wilmington, Delaware-based oral surgeon who chairs the Third Molar Task Force of the American Association of Oral Maxillofacial Surgeons. "If you lost your teeth, the wisdom teeth would be extra teeth that come in and function like normal teeth."

      Since fewer people in the United States today are in danger of losing their permanent teeth, though, wisdom teeth have generally outgrown their usefulness for us. If a checkup shows that your wisdom teeth may cause problems, your dentist will probably recommend that that the troublesome teeth be removed -- whether that means a couple of wisdom teeth or all four of them. In the event that all four have grown in normally, your dentist may adopt a wait-and-see approach, taking x-rays every few years to make sure they're still healthy.

      How do I know if my wisdom teeth should be removed?

      Check with your dentist. Pain and swelling around your wisdom teeth indicate that they're causing problems. Whether or not you have any symptoms, x-rays will show whether there's infection or whether your teeth are impacted -- that is, if there's no room for them to erupt through the gum.

      If I don't have any pain or swelling, can I just leave my wisdom teeth alone?

      Even if you don't have pain or swelling, your dentist may recommend that you get your wisdom teeth removed early on. The main reason is that recent studies show that wisdom teeth are linked to a higher rate of chronic bacterial infection in the gums, and can endanger the health of both the back and front teeth -- even if the patient feels no symptoms at all.

      A study of 329 patients who had intact wisdom teeth, for example, found that even though the participants had no symptoms of discomfort, there was still evidence of disease-causing bacteria around their wisdom teeth. In fact, the study authors, who published their report in a recent issue of the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, concluded that gum disease in young adults often begins around the wisdom teeth.

      It's also easier to remove the teeth when you're younger, because the jawbone is less dense and the tooth's root is not yet fully developed, according to American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

      What makes wisdom teeth more vulnerable to infection?

      According to Rafetto, the front teeth are better protected by gum tissue, which surrounds them like "a tight turtleneck collar." That keeps bacteria from getting under the gum line easily. The wisdom teeth, however, are surrounded by gum tissue that Rafetto likens to a "boat-neck collar," which allows more bacteria to get under the gum line and cause infection. Because it's harder to clean and floss between back teeth, they could harbor plaque and bacteria that could ultimately decay the teeth around them, including those in the front, Rafetto says.

      How are wisdom teeth removed?

      This depends on how deeply embedded in the jawbone your wisdom teeth are. Some impacted teeth are blocked by the gum from erupting, while others are partially encased in bone. In the past, wisdom teeth were removed in a hospital with the patient under general anesthesia; today wisdom teeth are almost always removed in an office setting by an oral or maxillofacial surgeon. If yours need to be extracted, you'll be given an anesthetic that you and your doctor decide on beforehand.

      Talk with your dentist or oral surgeon about advance preparations. In general, it's important to dress comfortably for the operation, bring someone along to help you get home, and avoid eating or drinking anything for at least six hours prior to surgery.

      Your surgeon will use as little force as possible to remove the tooth, carefully pushing the gum out of the way and then cutting the tooth into small sections for removal. Since you'll receive some type of sedation, you shouldn't feel any pain or discomfort during the surgery. After the teeth are removed, the surgeon will suture your gums back into place.

      What are the possible complications of wisdom teeth removal?

      Complications from wisdom tooth removal are rare. They include infection, temporary sinus complications, injury to other teeth, numbness (usually temporary), temporary joint problems in the jaw, and in very rare cases, jaw fracture. If the jaw seems weak after surgery, your doctor may advise avoiding hard foods until the healing is complete.

      What should I do after the surgery?

      The outcome of surgery to remove wisdom teeth is often visible: chipmunk cheeks. The good news is the symptoms don't last long, and dentists have many ways to minimize swelling or pain. The symptoms rarely last more than 48 to 72 hours.

      To allow the area to heal, you should eat only soft foods, soups, and liquids for at least the first two days following surgery. Complications are rare, but you should report any of the following symptoms of infection to your oral surgeon immediately:

      Fever of more than 100 degrees
      Abnormal swelling
      Pain or a bad or salty taste in your mouth, whether or not there's discharge from the site

      In some cases, blood doesn't properly form a clot in the tooth's empty socket, leading to a local infection known as "dry socket" about 48 hours after surgery. Although painful, the condition is easily treated by placing a medicated dressing on the extraction site.

      Of course, some bleeding and swelling around the empty socket is normal. Applying pressure to your gums will usually stop bleeding, and ice helps ease swelling. Raffeto advises patients to rinse with warm water and to use ice or a cold pack around the affected area of the jaw to reduce swelling. Patients who don't place ice in their mouths or ice packs on their jaw after the procedure are usually the ones in the worst shape when they come to see him for follow-up appointments a few days after surgery. "It makes a huge difference in recovery," Rafetto says.

      -- Laurie Udesky is an award-winning journalist and a frequent contributor to Consumer Health Interactive.

      Further Resources

      American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons:

      http://www.aaoms.org

      American Dental Association: http://www.ada.org

  17. QUESTION:
    Why should I get my non-impacted wisdom teeth removed?
    On Wikipedia's article about "wisdom teeth" it notes at the bottom that studies have shown that getting non-impacted wisdom teeth removed is unnecessary, according to a study. See it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom_teeth#Controversy

    Now to my question: my dentist thinks that I should get them removed for no other reason then what could possibly happen if I don't (he said something about cysts?). Well, what can happen, exactly? I've read that most problems arise with wisdom teeth that have actually become impacted. Is there any reason to believe I should have my parents drop several hundred dollars to get this potentially unnecessary (yikes, and painful!) surgery done? Is there any chance my wisdom teeth will never come in and never pose a problem anyway?

    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Here's something to consider: as we age our bone gets more dense. Removing wisdom teeth on a 16-20 year old is much easier than on a 30 year old. The recovery may also be easier.

      Cysts can form...they're rare (about 1 in 500)...but the treatment required is much more extensive than removal of a wisdom tooth. My aunt had a cyst related to a wisdom tooth that was not removed, and it was a plum-sized bubble in the posterior of the lower jaw (mandible). Treatment required scooping out the lining of the cyst and placing a solution to encourage bone fill. She went to the oral surgeons every other week for half a year and lived with the fear that her jaw would fracture with even minor trauma due to the thinness of the bone until it filled.

      I don't mean to scare you...I would encourage a second opinion as there are some situations where removal would be of greater value than leaving it in.

      Also, the feeling that teeth move because wisdom teeth push them is a fallacy. Our professor used to say that is like imagining a single volkswagen pushing on eight other cars and the one in front gets twisted...it just doesn't happen. What happens is there is some minor continued growth of the lower jaw after adolescence which can cause crowding of the lower front teeth.

  18. QUESTION:
    wisdom tooth removal...need surgery in hospital...help!?
    I just got back from a consultation with an oral surgeon, a couple of weeks ago i was having horrible pain in my jaw, went to the dentist and he told me my bottom left was impacted & infected, and both top and bottom need to be removed. Well, when I had panoramic x-rays done today the surgeon told me the left bottom (which has never bothered me) is actually the worst. It is unusually deep in the bone and has developed a cyst. As a result she recommeds I have this done as a same day surgical procedure in the hospital. I am scared out of my mind. Not of the procedure itself, but of the anesthesia. I'm sure it's because I've watched too many dateline horror stories of people who've had complications, haven't woken up, etc. I'm also afraid that due to my anxiety, it will cause even more complications. I did discuss this with the surgeon and she assures me everything will be fine but i'd appreciate any words from those who have gone through this, or dentists/oral surgeons themselves. TIA.
    ETA: Actually yes, my mother has had problems with anesthesia/sedation in the past. It's been described as an 'allergy' due to lupus, which she has (i do not, i've been checked). Still, it makes me very apprehensive. She's had several benign tumors removed from her breast, bladder, as well as wisdom teeth removed under a local. Once while being put under sedation her blood pressure dropped so drastically she almost died. The doctor says it's highly unlikely that i have the same allergy but the hospital if I do, the hospital is the best place to be.
    As far as intubation, the doc did say they would insert a breathing tube. I don't know how that would work since it's oral surgery, and it freaks me out, but at least I won't be awake.
    Lastly...no....I've never had general anesthesia before. At this point I wish I had, this would probably be a lot easier!

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem, only I had cysts under 3 of the 4 teeth.
      I have to say that the anesthesia was no sweat. It was one poke in the arm and then I was sleeping. They had it timed so well that I woke up just as they were finishing.
      There is always an anesthesiologist nearby as well as a CRNA... Nurse anesthetist.
      It is actually safer in the hospital as they can watch the levels very very carefully.
      I have scrubbed in to 100's of surgeries, and no one has had a problem with the anesthesia more than vomiting afterward.
      And that sometimes can happen with the blood draining down in to the stomach.
      Did anyone in your family have any problems with anesthesia?
      Have you have undergone anesthesia?
      If no one in your family had any problems, you are less likely to have a problem.
      There are always risks.... but you can minimize them by not smoking, being of good health, and having good overall pulmonary function.
      You probably won't be intubated as it would be difficult to have at your teeth....
      Instead you will be put under lightly.
      Talk to the anesthesia team that'll be dealing with you to help with your anxiety levels.
      Good luck.

  19. QUESTION:
    My gums are swelling around my wisdom tooth...normal?
    I Have my two upper wisdom teeth and one lower left wisdom tooth in, they barely hurt at all coming in, i just had a little irritation. But this last one is causing me SO much pain =[ The gums are swollen around the tooth growing in, and i have braces so the swelling is going into one of my brackets which is making it even worse D= I have been taking Tylenol 3 and i just gargled with salt water, but the pain is still sooo bad. Can anyone PLEASE give me some advice??! I cant take the pain!

    • ANSWER:
      THEY HURT BECAUSE WELL NVMD LOOK AT THIS...
      THIS IS FROM THE WEBSITE IVE LISTED...

      http://www.cincinnati-oralsurgery.com/wisdom.htm

      It seems that everyone in their late teens and early 20's have been urged by their dentist to have their wisdom teeth removed. Some of the rumors about wisdom teeth are true ..... many of the rumors are not. The following is a patient's guide to wisdom teeth.

      Wisdom teeth appear as the last tooth in the mouth and begin to erupt around the age of 16 years. This has been called the age of wisdom although that parallelism would be questioned by many. Depending on the reference source, up to 90% of the population does not have enough room for wisdom teeth to erupt into a position which is accessible for good hygiene.

      A commonly asked question is, "Why do we have wisdom teeth if there is no room in the jaws for them?". The answer has to do with diet. According to the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery, in a article entitled, Management of Asymptomatic Impacted Wisdom Teeth, Vol. 34 October 1996, the author notes that in Neolithic man the average, highly abrasive diet caused attrition of the teeth resulting in a reduction in the size of the molars from front to back. This decrease in size from the abrasive nature of the food ingested allowed for the forward migration of the teeth and adequate space for the eruption of the wisdom teeth. With the arrival of processed foods and a reduction in the amount of chewing necessary to reduce the food for swallowing, less wear occurs. This coupled with a decrease in the loss of teeth as a result of a decrease in cavities, requires modern generations to address impacted and partially impacted wisdom teeth.

      When the wisdom tooth cannot be cleaned, infection results. It is the potential for infection and the potential for this infection to spread to other teeth that usually motivates the patient to have the wisdom teeth removed. Other commonly sited justifications for the removal of wisdom teeth like the potential for them to cause cysts, tumors, or cancer or the potential for them to cause crowding and shifting of the other teeth in the mouth are highly suspect. Although many believe that wisdom teeth cause crowding, this has never been definitively proven in any well controlled scientific study. Additionally, the potential for them to cause cysts or tumors is very, very low. Although removing a wisdom tooth can weaken the jaw for a short period of time post-operatively, leaving a wisdom tooth in does not cause the jaw in the area to be inherently weak. As mentioned before, cancer occurring in wisdom teeth is a rare phenomenon.

      Having dispelled the evils of leaving wisdom teeth in, it is important to reemphasize the primary reason for taking them out.

      Wisdom teeth are removed primarily to eliminate the potential for infection and damage to adjacent teeth. Remember, the jaws of most individuals are not large enough to accommodate the wisdom teeth and they remain either under the gum tissue where they have a three to five percent chance of becoming cystic or they become partially exposed where they have a much, much greater potential for becoming infected. Infection causes bone loss, damage to adjacent teeth and PAIN. When the dentist determines that no room exists for the wisdom teeth to erupt into a normal position, the decision then becomes, do you wait for the infection to occur or do you remove the tooth before infection and pain begins. Study after study has been done to show that infection commonly occurs around malposed wisdom teeth. Study after study confirms that complications from the extraction of wisdom teeth increases dramatically as the patient enters their 30's. Once symptoms of pocketing, swelling, food impaction or pain begin, removal is the most prudent course since the symptoms will not abate until the teeth are removed. Should the patient have only symptomatic wisdom teeth removed and leave other asymptomatic wisdom teeth in the mouth until later? This depends on the relative position of the other wisdom teeth and whether or not the patient wants to be operated on more than once. Most dentists agree that one surgery is best and that multiple trips to the oral surgeon for the removal of wisdom teeth is not in the best interest of the patient and only raises the potential for complications from multiple anesthetics.

      IMPACTED WISDOM TEETH
      When a wisdom tooth is blocked from erupting, it is termed impacted. Wisdom teeth can be impacted in the gum tissue overlying them. These are called soft tissue impactions and are many times removed by general dentists rather than oral surgeons. (Unfortunately, for the patient, soft tissue impactions end up begin more difficult than they sometimes appear because of the curvature of the roots that are not apparent on the x-rays. Is your general dentist trained to perform more complicated procedures if necessary? (Be sure to ask). Wisdom teeth more commonly a

  20. QUESTION:
    After wisdom tooth removal little lump/blister/cyst has formed?
    I'm not sure how to describe it better than that. On 10/22/10 I had all four wisdom teeth removed. A week later during my follow-up surgeon said extractions sites looked really good. No dry sockets! I'm so thankful for that! However, a few days ago, I noticed this little bump on the outside of my top left extraction socket - like between the gum and cheek. It doesn't really hurt and when I pulled my cheek back to try and examine it, it just looks like a little white bump. Like a blister or cyst of sort. Just wondering if I should be concerned?

    • ANSWER:
      You <> concerned enough to call the surgeon's office for an opinion/appointment. There is no one out here in the cyber world who is really able to answer that. Even if they once had a similar occurrence, it may have been from a totally different cause.

      The surgeon needs to take a look and decide if there is anything that needs treatment. Do it now - before their is any more opportunity for a problem to develop.

  21. QUESTION:
    I think my Wisdom tooth is hatching.?
    I feel this hard thing on my last up right corner gum I think its a wisdom tooth cause I can feel moler shape. I also have a question everyone gets wisdom teeth right? Do you have to get them removed? And what are % people have to get them removed.

    • ANSWER:
      Wisdom teeth are a valuable asset to the mouth when they are healthy and properly positioned. Often, however, problems develop that require their removal. When the jaw isn't large enough to accommodate wisdom teeth, they can become impacted (unable to come in or misaligned). Wisdom teeth may grow sideways, emerge only part way from the gum or remain trapped beneath the gum and bone.

      Extraction of wisdom teeth is generally recommended when:

      Wisdom teeth only partially erupt. This leaves an opening for bacteria to enter around the tooth and cause an infection. Pain, swelling, jaw stiffness and general illness can result.

      There is a chance that poorly aligned wisdom teeth will damage adjacent teeth.

      A cyst (fluid-filled sac) forms, destroying surrounding structures such as bone or tooth roots.

      Patients should ask the dentist about the health and positioning of their wisdom teeth. The dentist may make a recommendation for removal or send the patient to an oral surgeon for further evaluation.

  22. QUESTION:
    Large, cyst like lump on the very back (where your wisdom teeth come) on bottom of mouth...?
    I woke up this morning with my mouth kinda hurting and it feels weird when I swallow, so I went to the bathroom and opened my mouth and I had two cyst like things in the bottom of my mouth like on my gum (where wisdom teeth usually come in) and I am just wondering if it could be my wisdom teeth coming in or something else? I'm 17, is it normal to get your wisdom teeth this late?

    • ANSWER:
      It's called pericoronitis
      Have wisdom teeth surgery by a wisdom teeth specialist
      And sedation for removal of wisdom teeth is terrific
      http://wisdomteethaustralia.com.au/wisdom-teeth-problems/index.html

  23. QUESTION:
    Do wisdom teeth HAVE TO HAVE TO be removed?

    • ANSWER:
      two views in it.some advocate prophylactic removal of wisdom teeth since most of them are impacted and cant be saved and also associated with high incidence of pathologies.(cysts and tumors)
      others tell to remove ONLY when there is a need.removal of wisdom teeth can be justified in the following situations.
      when it is impacted and causing pain
      when it is associated with pain due to dental caries and cant be saved though not impacted.
      when associated with pathology such as cyst and tumors
      when the presence and position of wisdom teeth interferes with health status and treatment of second molar.
      when there is repeated occurrence of pericoronitis.
      sometimes due to orthodontic reasons.
      Due to temperomandibular joint problems(especially buccoverted maxillary third molars)
      i suggest you to remove your wisdom teeth only when there is a need.but if you suspect any pain or disturbance with wisdom teeth,visit your dentist and have a follow up on the particular teeth.treatment can be done accordingly.

  24. QUESTION:
    i have a wisdom tooth that is making my mouth hurt.?
    i don't know if it is because of my cavities, tooth decay or wisdom tooth but the left side of my mouth hurts. it has been hurting for less than a week. i have a wisdom tooth in the way back of the upper part of mouth that has been growing for almost 2 years now. i think is halfway fully grown. should i get it pulled? if so does anyone know where i can go that accepts Premier dental group insurance?
    my mouth doesn't hurt as much today but it still hurts to open my mouth. should i call my dentist to make an appointment for them to take a look at it and see if they think i should get it pulled?
    i went to my dentist today and they said it wasn't impacted or infected. my gum and jaw around it is just sore because it is swollen but they gave me a syringe to use on it with warm salt water to make the pain go down a little and it worked it doesn't hurt a lot anymore. i have one that is already gone on the top back right that didn't hurt and i have another one growing on the bottom left.

    • ANSWER:
      Wisdom teeth usually emerge from the gum between the ages of 17 and 24. They are the last of the molar teeth, which are the large grinding teeth at the back of the mouth. Some people never develop wisdom teeth and others have up to four - one in each corner of the mouth.

      Wisdom teeth usually cause no problems. They are described as impacted when there is not enough space for them at the back of the mouth. Impacted wisdom teeth can cause pain, swelling, infection or damage to the teeth next to them. If the gum around the wisdom tooth is swollen the jaw may become stiff and sore. Infection at the back of the mouth can cause bad breath and a bad taste.

      The surgical removal (extraction) of one or more wisdom teeth can relieve these problems. However, removing the wisdom teeth does not usually improve crookedness or crowding of other teeth.

      If you have problems such as infection, cysts, tooth decay or gum disease around a wisdom tooth you may think about having it removed.

      If you have impacted wisdom teeth that are not causing problems, you don't need to have them removed.

  25. QUESTION:
    how serious is wisdom tooth removal surgery?
    I have 3 partially capped wisdom teeth growing at really awkward angles.

    does it always involve general anaesthesia?
    is the recovery time always up to 72 days?
    will my wisdom teeth kill me if I just leave them be?

    • ANSWER:
      It is a pretty common surgery but a surgery none the less. I had 2 teeth that were out of my gums, and 2 that were still below that were impacted. With impaced teeth what they have to do commonly is create a tisue flap where they cut between your two mollars and get at the tooth by pulling back your gums. This leaves you with quite a few stitches and tender gums for a while. It took my tissue flap over 3 weeks to completely heal, before then I would get food stuck inbetween my gums and my tooth. This, I think is the most invasive part of the surgery, and since the majority of your teeth are already growing in, hopefully they will just have to pull them.

      You don't always havee to have general anesthesia, in fact the majority get it done under local or conscious/twilight sedation. This was something I never knew until I had to get my wisdom teeth removed for health reasons (there was a cyst on the one and we had to make sure it wasn't cancer or anything). General sedation you have to go to the hospital to recieve and with that you need to be ventalated and stay the night in the hospital to make sure that everything is OK. There are risks involved when getting general. You are fully asleep. Now I had conscious sedation or twilight sedation, and I was knocked out and cannot remember half the day. I was still breathing on my own and was able to leave the office 30 minutes after the surgery. That being said, not everyone is put to sleep with this kind of sedation, it can make you really calm. IT really depends on how much theygive you. A huge benefit of this is that there are less risks that you have to take.

      The recovery time is not always 72 hours. I had complications after my wisdomt teeth so I would say that my gums were healing by the week point but I was not recovered for probably 2 weeks after because I had 2 dry sockets I had to get repacked.

      No your wisdom teeth won't kill you but they could kill your teeth depending on the angle they are at. This could cause major issues for you in the future.

  26. QUESTION:
    wisdom teeth and tooth gap?
    my mom keeps telling me that when my wisdom teeth come in, my two front teeth with smoosh together and my HUGE GAP (okay it's slight but my biggest insecurity) will fill itself in. is this true? or should i get something done to it? my teeth are perfect except for that, so i don't think braces would be appropriate. HELP! thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      getting sedated is a great way to get them out, you won't remember a thing! I recommend taking an ibuprofen before you get sedated this will help with swelling later. just use only enough water to swallow the pills b/c you are not to have anything to eat or drink after midnight the night before.

      go to the grocery and stock up on soft cool food, mashed potatoes, soups, ice cream, yogurt, apple sauce, grits, eggs, (slim fast or ensure if you feel you can't eat!!) pudding, etc...think easy to swallow and soft!

      wear comfortable clothing because you will still be really groggy after the surgery. I went home and went back to sleep. I woke up and had some soup and a pain pill and went back to sleep again!!! but everyone is different.

      after they are removed, you will be numb for quite sometime. ONLY eat soft cool food while you are numb. (ice cream, apple sauce, mashed potatoes, milkshake (WITH A SPOON do not suck through a straw), yogurt, etc. things like that. after the numbness wears off you will be able to eat warm foods again...just nothing hard or crunchy.

      you will be given pain pills and i would taken them with an ibuprofen to reduce swelling, pain pills ONLY work on pain, not swelling. you will use ice pack 15 minutes on each side for the 1st day, after that you can use heat packs if you feel you need it. NO swishing or spitting, or smoking the first 24 hours!!!! this will cause a dry socket.

      They will be sore!!!!!! make sure to do warm salt water rinses as this helps it to heal faster and keeps it clean. Please be sure to eat even if you do not feel like it, taking pain pills on an empty stomach will cause you to throw up. you should be able to eat whatever you can tolerate the day or so after. it really depends on you, some people can't eat a burger the next day, others can. if you are still really sore stick to soft foods.....in a few days you will be able to eat whatever you want. just please stay away from hard, crunchy things. they will go over all the instructions with you at the DRs office.

      you will be given gauze to take home with you, if not you can pick some up at the grocery/pharmacy (4x4 gauze) you will fold it up and place one piece on each side over the "holes" bite down like you normally would, NOT forcefully!! this applies pressure and helps stop the bleeding. check the gauze in an hour when its saturated change it out with 2 new pieces of 4x4 gauze. check it again 1 hr later.. when the gauze gets to where its not saturated, its only spotted with blood... you are probably done bleeding...the site will ooze blood this is normal, but if they haven't or won't stop bleeding call your dr he may need to help out. this hardly ever happens. DO NOT keep putting in gauze and taking it out...sometimes it prevents the blood clot from clotting. if its not bleeding or even if its spotting do not put gauze back in there...now if for some reason it beginning to bleed again then put some gauze back.

      *After your appointment, eat something, take a pain pill, go back to sleep. good luck and rent some movies, lay in bed and relax.

      I found this on a website:

      Top 10 reasons to remove wisdom teeth:

      10. Because there is limited space for wisdom teeth to erupt and because the surrounding gums are difficult to keep clean. Infection and inflammation are therefore common even when there are no apparent symptoms.

      9. Even when wisdom teeth erupt through the gum tissues, they rarely provide any meaningful function and are always difficult to keep clean.

      8. Wisdom teeth have high risk of getting cavities on them because they are very hard to clean while brushing and flossing.

      7. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth develop cysts, and rarely tumors. Removal of such lesions may require extensive procedures to repair and restore jaw function and appearance.

      6. With age, the chance for complications related to the removal of wisdom teeth increases.

      5. Gum disease and inflammation associated with wisdom teeth may lead to receding gum tissues, deterioration of the jawbone and tooth loss.

      4. Wisdom teeth may contribute to crowding of nearby teeth.

      3. Even wisdom teeth that seem to be problem-free remain a breeding ground for oral infection and inflammation. Research supports the concept that such inflammation may enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development and/or progression of a variety of diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

      2. Once it has been determined that a wisdom tooth will not successfully erupt into your mouth and be maintained in a healthy state, early extraction of wisdom teeth is associated with faster and easier recovery.

      1. The number one reason for removing wisdom teeth: Peace of mind!

      Source: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  27. QUESTION:
    There's a cyst behind my lower left wisdom tooth, is there anyway to remove?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you are a young 19 or 20 year old, yes, go to the doctor and have your wisdom tooth removed. This is very common with most everyone at a young age and they have to have them removed due to these problems. This is a common problem with wisdom teeth, they are not needed and removal will save you a lot of problems and pain.
      Here are reasons to have your wisdom tooth removed according to WEBMD.com
      Pain or jaw stiffness near an impacted tooth.
      Pain or irritation from a tooth coming in at an awkward angle and rubbing against your cheek, tongue, or top or bottom of the mouth.
      An infected swelling in the flap of gum tissue that has formed on top of an impacted tooth that has partially broken through the gum. When wisdom teeth only partially break through, the skin next to the tooth opens up. Germs can get in around the tooth and gum, causing infection.
      Crowding of other teeth.
      Tooth decay or gum disease if there's not enough room to properly care for the wisdom tooth and surrounding teeth.
      Go to your dentist as soon as possible to get it examined, I would bet you need it removed. I'm speaking from experience for myself, my children and my grandchildren who have all suffered the same problem with wisdom teeth, good luck and hope you feel better soon.

  28. QUESTION:
    impacted wisdom tooth removal...maybe?
    apparently i have a wisdom tooth that is impacted (don't ask me why i only have 1 wisdom tooth, i don't know. lol) anyways, it's impacted and trying to grow sideways and just part of the side is sticking out of my gums. it doesn't hurt, and it's never bothered me in anyway, but i've heard that even if it's not causing pain, wisdom teeth can still be problematic. should i talk to my dentist about getting it removed, or wait and see if it bothers me later on? i want to make the right choice here! thanks!

    it's a lot like the one in the pic... http://bronpit.files.wordpress.com/2008/01/wisdom1.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      If it is like the one in the picture it will need to be removed to prevent infection, damage to the tooth in front of it, crowding of the front teeth, and formation of a cyst around the tooth. See your dentist for an x-ray and further evaluation and advice. good luck.

  29. QUESTION:
    wisdom teeth removal URGENT surgery scheduled in three hours ?
    I am 32 and my wisdom teeth are coming in now . Both my lower wisdom teeth are horizontally impacted (but not yet erupted) and therefore need to go . My upper left wisdom tooth is aligned fine and has space ( as shown in panoramic X ray ) but my upper right wisdom tooth doesnt seem to have space thou it is also aligned correctly . My insurance has run out and i need to know if i can leave both the upper teeth in and just have the lowers removed . Will they cause a problem later on esp the upper right one ? As everytime i will have to pay for the sedation if i dont get them out now. But if theres no big problem (other than space) i would really like to leave them in. Also i have another right lower molar which is abscessing and the doctor says i should get it out too , thou it never hurts ? ! Should i wait for it to start hurting and then go for extraction , the principal being so far so good ? And for as long as i can get work done from it why not ? I have another 5 months in US and
    and then i will be back in my country where dental is not such a huge expense . I need to know if letting my upper wisdom teeth in , can cause me any more problem in 5 month time as they are just beginning to get hard and erupt. Please respond so i can take the correct decision before tomorrow. thks a ton . Also can i get them removed with local anaethesia and spare the cost of sedation ? Does it hurt more then ?
    btw i have big teeth does it mean the size of my wisdom teeth also will be big esp upper ?
    error in header - surgery is scheduled for tommorow not in 3 hrs . and the way im making mistakes u guys can just imagine how scared im !
    PENELOPE, u are so unfair, we r here coz there is not sufficient intellectual pool here, the kind the american cos. needs n they have to get them from elsewhere. While here we tour a lot which is giving revenue to ur tourism industry , we pay ALL taxes in full and will continue to pay after we leave as the law dictates that once anyone has resided more than 180 days they are bound to pay the taxes for lifetime.! The dentist i went to unethically treated me for gum probs which i never had , and bleeded my insurance dry . I found this when i took second opinion midway . 2nd if u could compare medical costs for any country , u would realize the government subsidizes such things to benefit their citizens , if the US doesnt do it or u are not eligible to receive it , no need to rant at us.We are paying full for all that we use here and "give" intellectual knowhow,there is no Q of "taking" n running away,we r choosing to go!!! take a chill pill n be objective n gracious like ur fellow men

    • ANSWER:
      -you were right the lower widom teeth need to go for they will cause further damage to your lower molars.
      -the upper left wisdom tooth can be left there in its place cuase it has a bigger tendency to erupt 'coz it has sufficiant space. but if it erupts and you find that you are having a hard time cleaning it you could always have it removed later.
      -the upper right wisdom teeth must be removed if a part of it is showing because it might decay and cause other damages (like a cyst or something). but if the tooth is fully embedded in bone you can leave it there.
      - the other right molar can be saved by root canal therapy (ask your dentist bout it) that way you won't need to have it removed. but if you decide to have it removed don't wait for it to start hurting, before you have it extracted, the abcess might interfere with the components of the anesthesia making extraction painful.
      -and yes, you can have you 3rd molars removed using only local anesthesia instead of sedation ^.^

  30. QUESTION:
    Which hurt more(rate 1-10) Mole removal,piercings,tattoo ,having wisdom tooth pull out or cyst removal?
    Cuz ill have em all. Hehe the mole removal is on my face beside my nose. And which heals faster and slower? :)

    • ANSWER:

  31. QUESTION:
    Is the removal of a complete bony wisdom tooth more painful than an impacted one?
    I am having all four removed. My 2 upper are impacted. The lower left is complete bony and has a cyst around it, the lower right is completely bony and is horizontal. Is it more complicated, and painful for the lower 2?

    • ANSWER:
      I wouldn't exactly use the terms of being more painful. It is going to require more work and usually the removal of more bone to get those teeth out. You should receive pain medication that will help you with post-operative discomfort. Don't forget the ice and keep yourself elevated to help with the swelling! P/S: if you're going to a surgeon relax, this is their job and this is what they do everyday. You're in good hands! Good luck!

  32. QUESTION:
    I have a wisdom tooth growing in sideways?
    All of my other wisdom teeth are perfectly normal, but the one on the bottom right side is sideways and causes a lot of discomfort,and from time to time, intense pain. My dentist said that if he pulled one wisdom tooth, he'd have to do all of them. Is this true, or is he just looking to get more money when it is not necessary to pull them?

    • ANSWER:
      i think what your dentist saying is NOT CORRECT.if there is pain in one wisdom teeth,let him do ONLY THAT.

      it doesnt mean that all other wisdom teeth has to be removed even in ABSENCE of symptoms.

      Removal of wisdom teeth (third molar) can be justified in the following situations.

      1.when it is impacted /abnormally positioned and causing pain
      2.when it is associated with pain due to dental caries and cant be saved though not impacted.
      3.when associated with pathology such as cyst and tumors
      4.when the presence and position of wisdom teeth interferes with health status and treatment of second molar.
      5.when there is repeated occurrence of pericoronitis.
      sometimes due to orthodontic reasons.
      6.Due to temperomandibular joint problems(especially buccoverted maxillary third molars)

      get it done ONLY THAT TOOTH WHICH IS GIVING PAIN.

      if your dentist is still wants to take all the teeth,CHANGE THE DENTIST AND go to another.
      FOLLOW the INSTRUCTIONS given after removal of wisom teeth CAREFULLY.
      good luck

  33. QUESTION:
    Dentigerous Cyst concern.?
    I have read on the internet that dentigerous cysts are fairly common and that they rarely lead to cancerous tumours.

    I had an upper wisdom tooth removed last week. It was only a small one but as the dentist removed it he informed me that I had a "small" dentigerous cyst in that area. After having a panoramic X-ray taken, it turned out that there was another larger wisdom tooth higher up on the same side as the one he removed (i.e. I have 5 in total !).

    I wondered if anyone else has had this type of dental cyst before and what the outcome was

    • ANSWER:
      Many people have cysts and they can rarely become cancerous. In general it is safe to watch the cyst, but if it grows on the x-ray you should consider having it removed at that point. Most of the time we just yearly take a picture of the area (which insurance may not cover a panoramic x-ray once every 3-5 years so you may have to pay). Compare it to last years, if it grows time to have it removed. If there is no change it is probably fine and can continue being watched. Other changes like pain in the area may require removal. Lastly, ask your surgeon if he had the tumor tested and if cancerous or precancerous cells were present. If they were you might want to go ahead and have the last removed. Once removed there should be no complications unless it has spread to a different area. This is highly unlikely b/c the tumor is usually removed before there is a chance.

  34. QUESTION:
    What is like during wisdom teeth surgery?
    im 14 years old, and in 3 week i am getting my wisdom teeth out, under local anesthethia. what is it like? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      An oral and maxillofacial surgeon or your dentist can remove (extract) a wisdom tooth. The procedure often can be done in the dentist's or surgeon's office. You may have the surgery in the hospital, especially if you are having all your wisdom teeth pulled at one time or if you are at high risk for complications.

      To remove the wisdom tooth, your dentist will open up the gum tissue over the tooth and take out any bone that is covering the tooth. He or she will separate the tissue connecting the tooth to the bone and then remove the tooth. Sometimes the dentist will cut the tooth into smaller pieces to make it easier to remove.

      . The following tips will help speed your recovery.

      * Bite gently on the gauze pad periodically, and change pads as they become soaked with blood. Call your dentist or oral surgeon if you still have bleeding 24 hours after your surgery.
      * While your mouth is numb, be careful not to bite the inside of your cheek or lip, or your tongue.
      * Do not lie flat. This may prolong bleeding. Prop up your head with pillows.
      * Try using an ice pack on the outside of your cheek for the first 24 hours. You can use moist heat-such as a washcloth soaked in warm water and wrung out-for the following 2 or 3 days.
      * Relax after surgery. Physical activity may increase bleeding.
      * Eat soft foods, such as gelatin, pudding, or a thin soup. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as healing progresses.
      * Do not use a straw for the first few days. Sucking on a straw can loosen the blood clot and delay healing.
      * After the first day, gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water several times a day to reduce swelling and relieve pain.
      * Do not smoke for at least 24 hours after your surgery. The sucking motion can loosen the clot and delay healing. In addition, smoking decreases the blood supply and can bring germs and contaminants to the surgery area.
      * Avoid rubbing the area with your tongue or touching it with your fingers.
      * Continue to brush your teeth and tongue carefully.

      * Your jaw may not be large enough for them, and they may become impacted and unable to break through your gums.
      * Your wisdom teeth may break partway through your gums, causing a flap of gum tissue to grow over them. Food and germs can get trapped under the flap and cause your gums to become red, swollen, and painful. These are signs of infection.
      * More serious problems can develop from impacted teeth, such as infection, damage to other teeth and bone, or a cyst.
      * One or more of your wisdom teeth may come in at an awkward angle, with the top of the tooth facing forward, backward, or to either side.
      * You may never have any problems with your wisdom teeth.
      * It is rarely harmful to your health to have your wisdom teeth removed, but there are slight risks involved with any surgery.
      * In younger people (late teens and early 20s), the wisdom tooth's roots are not fully developed and the jaw bone is not as dense, so it is easier to remove the tooth. The easier it is to remove the tooth, the easier your recovery is likely to be.
      * Most problems with wisdom teeth develop between the ages of 15 and 25.
      * If you are older than age 30, you have only a small risk of having problems with your wisdom teeth. Few people older than 30 develop problems that require removal of their wisdom teeth.
      * Medical insurance does not always cover this procedure.
      * If you have a medical condition that may get worse over time and your teeth may cause problems, consider having your wisdom teeth removed while you are healthy.
      * Possible complications include dry socket (alveolar osteitis), infection, bleeding, and numbness, but the overall chance of complications is less than 2% (2 in 100 people). The risk is slightly higher if you have wisdom teeth removed from the lower jaw than from the upper jaw.2

      After a wisdom tooth is removed, you may experience:

      * Pain and swelling in your gums and tooth socket where the tooth was removed.
      * Bleeding that won't stop for about 24 hours.
      * Difficulty with or pain from opening your jaw (trismus).
      * Slow-healing gums.
      * Damage to dental work, such as crowns or bridges, or to roots of a nearby tooth.
      * A painful inflammation called dry socket.

  35. QUESTION:
    Getting My Wisdom Teeth Surgically Removed (Questions)?
    Will It Hurt? (honest please) [compare It To Getting Stiches]

    How Long Will The Surgery Take?

    Will I Be Able To Eat?

    What Else Will I Need To Know?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey there! I had my wisdom teeth surgically removed in August so all of this is very fresh for me.

      1)I'm nor going to lie, it does hurt. I was lucky and never let my pain get to the point where it was unbarible. The one thing that I felt made it easier was that I had a constant medication schedule and took the pain killers even if I wasn't feeling that much pain. I used the medication as proactive and not as a reactive measure. By not letting the pain get too bad then I never felt that much pain. When you get the surgery, they will numb you up really well. I didn't have full use of my bottom lip until that night (yes it was gross but I couldn't drink a lot because I was drooling). I was feeling good the day of the surgery, the anestetic made me loopy plus I was really frozen. Also a good thing to do is when you get home to ice on for 20 minutes and ice off every other 20 minutes. This was really helpful with keeping down the swelling.

      2) This depends on how complicated your teeth are and how experienced your surgeon is. My friends who had it done it took around 45 minutes in total. Mine was bizzar case, I had to get tissue flaps for my bottoms (where they cut inbetween the two molars and then pull back the gums to get at the imacted wisdom tooth) and just pulled my top 2. While they were in there they also found a cyst so removed that as well. My mom was told that mine would take around the 45 minutes but it ended up only taking 20. I have no clue why because mine was a more complicated process.

      3) It really depends on the case. My friend and I got them out within a month of each other, she was not able to eat solid foods for the 5 days. When I heard this I went out and stocked up on soup. When I got mine out on the second day I was already tired of soft foods so I decided to eat normal food. I had a soft pretzle and a salad. It really depends on the person and the surgeon who does it. My surgeon, he works 6 days a week and does the majority of wisdom teeth removals, plus is a professor at the local university. My friend had some random oral surgeon. I would say on avarage you could eat maybe on your third-fifth day. I was just a strange case. I also went shopping on my third day which is kind of unheard of.

      4) Icing your face will be the most important. What I did was put an icepack into a pillowcase and tue it to my face with a scarf. This felt amazing and really minimized my swelling. My best piece of advice is to if you feel extreme pain, go in and get the surgeon to look at it. I was feeling some bad pain on my 4th day but assumed that the pain was just normal. When I was on the morning on my 6th day I was woken up feeling like I got punched in the face. This is when my morphine wore off. It ends up that I had 2 dry sockets. The one got really bad durig that time and I needed it to be packed a few times.

      As for getting sick from the medication: I did too! I had a medication cocktail of 4 different medications I needed to take. What I found really helped was taking it on a full stomach (when its 1 in the morning I drank some Ensure rather than get food). The next thing I found really helpful was taking a dose of gravol at the same time as taking medication.

  36. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth pain and headache?
    What can i do my bottom ones have nearly finished coming through but my top ones especially on the right side are coming through it is horrifically painful!! What can i use to numb the pain. Its also making me have really bad headaches.
    Also to add i have severe agoraphobia meaning i am unable to leave the house at all but if someone will let me know a good numbing gel or somthing i can get my partner to get me some

    • ANSWER:
      I would strongly recommend you go see a dentist as there could be more important issues at hand than just numbing the pain.
      Your wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to emerge from your gums during your late teens, or "age of wisdom", which gives them their name. They often become impacted or trapped in the jaw bone and gums and fail to erupt as straight and fully functioning teeth. Impacted wisdom teeth nearly always have to be removed. This can result in much pain and discomfort.
      Here are some common issues:

      1. INFECTION (PERIOCORONTIS): The mouth is full of bacteria that normally do not get past the protective layer of gums. But when an impacted tooth breaks through the gum surface, bacteria can get in causing an infection in the gums around the crown of the tooth. This infection can cause severe pain, swelling, jaw stiffness, and even general illness.
      2. DESTRUCTION OF THE NEXT TOOTH: An impacted tooth may still try to grow where it has no room, eroding the tooth next to it. This is called RESORBTION. Eventually, this could lead to the loss of both teeth.
      3. PAIN: Infection in a decayed wisdom tooth or in the gum around an impacted tooth can cause pain. If a decayed wisdom tooth is not situated in a healthy position, or if it is not restorable, we may recommend its removal. An impacted tooth can also cause pain if it presses against a nerve or the next tooth.
      4. CROWDING: An impacted tooth can crowd nearby molars out of alignment. If you are undergoing orthodontic care, we may recommend that your impacted wisdom teeth be removed.
      5. CYSTS: When a tooth is impacted, the sac of tissue around the crown remains in the bone. Occasionally, the sac fills with fluid forming a cyst that can readily destroy or enlarge the bone and endanger surrounding structures.

  37. QUESTION:
    Just got my wisdom teeth out yeaturday becuase they were crowding my teeth. Im 16 so...?
    Just got my wisdom teeth out yeaturday becuase they were crowding my teeth. Im 16 so does this mean thay my teeth will straighten out becuase they are not being pushed around and overcrowded? OR does this mean my teeth will just not get any worse?

    Thanks alot.

    T
    If not, what are the benefits of having your wisdom teeth removed. I heard people eat better, dont get headaches and have a lower chance of heart disease.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      It means they will not get any worse. Benefits of removal can be, prevention of damage to the adjacent teeth, prevention of future infection, prevention of cyst formation, and no worry about trying to keep them clean and preventing gum problems and decay.

  38. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth, why do we have them?
    I've always wondered, why do we have wisdom teeth, if they just end up being pulled out? Did they serve a purpose at some point?

    • ANSWER:
      Wisdom teeth used to serve a useful purpose, but are now considered vestigial organs. A vestige is a degenerative or imperfectly formed organ or structure having little or no utility, but in the earlier stage of development of a species performed a useful function. The reasons that wisdom teeth are now "outdated" are many. Until quite recently, our diet included mostly very coarse food, as well as impurities such as dirt and sand. This coarseness would abrade teeth so significantly that they would take up less space in the jaw. Permanent teeth were also frequently lost at an early age, which would create more space in the jaw. Because the diet was so coarse and hard to chew, the jaw itself would develop into a larger bone because of this constant workout. All of these factors would create more space for the wisdom teeth when they came in.

      The heavily processed diet of today does not produce the tooth abrasion or jaw development that we used to see. Modern dentistry has pretty much eliminated significant loss of permanent teeth at an early age. This leaves us with too many teeth and not enough jaw. The wisdom teeth still develop as they always have, but they have no where to go. When this happens, the teeth are considered "impacted," meaning that they are not in normal position and function.

      Impacted wisdom teeth

      Besides serving no useful function, the impacted teeth will often cause damage because they cannot be cleaned properly and can collect food debris, bacteria and plaque around them. This can result in tooth decay, gum disease, infection and abscess of not only the wisdom teeth, but of the molars next door and of the surrounding gum tissue. The molars in front of the wisdom teeth are sometimes lost because of cavities and gum disease caused by the inability to clean the wisdom teeth properly. Cyst formation and other destructive pathology are also seen around impacted wisdom teeth.

      Cavities caused by poor cleaning around wisdom teeth

      Cyst forming around wisdom tooth

      If removal of the wisdom teeth is indicated, the procedure is recommended in the late teenage years, before the roots are completely formed. Surgical procedures in general are better tolerated when one is young and healthy, and the gum tissues tend to heal better and more predictably when young. Most people experience minimal disruption of their normal routines, and time off from work or school is usually minimal.

  39. QUESTION:
    wisdom tooth? get it out or not?
    there is wisdom tooth in my mouth? Does it necessery to take it out ? if not, will there be any problem?

    • ANSWER:
      It's not necessary to get them out, but it's not a bad idea, either. Wisdom teeth can grow in at a weird angle and push all of your other teeth aside. They could damage a nerve, form into a cyst, etc. etc. etc.

      Removal isn't that bad.

  40. QUESTION:
    why is one side of my face still swollen after wisdom teeth removal 2 months ago?
    got them removed 2 months ago. as the first week came to an end i noticed that the swelling on one side began to go down but the other did not. i went to the dentist and he gave me an antibiotic. it went down. it swelled up again horribly i mean my cheek was humongous about a month later. and now again it is happpening about a month later. why is this happening? i take care of my teeth brush 3x a day, salt water rinse 3x a day and syringe a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      Swelling can be normal up to about 4 weeks after wisdom tooth removal; after that, though, swelling is a bit of a red flag that something went wrong.

      Several things can cause swelling after removal of a wisdom tooth; the most common possibility would be a post-operative infection. No matter how much you take care of it at home, the infection can develop due to many factors beyond your control. Once the infection develops, it's internal, so there's no way for rinsing or using the syringe to help (although it won't hurt, and will improve the health of the gum tissue in the area, so I'd definitely keep doing it). It sounds like you may have developed a post-op infection that was either resistant to the antibiotic given, and you needed a much stronger antibiotic to resolve the problem, or that you have another factor causing the infection, such as a bone spicule or cyst that was not removed when the wisdom tooth was extracted.

      It can be fairly common for a dentist to miss a small piece of wisdom tooth, leaving it behind in the socket to cause an infection, or for a small bone abnormality or cyst to develop after the infection; sometimes, however, the only way to treat this is for your dentist to go back in and remove it.

      In fact, sometimes the infected area needs to be re-opened and scraped out, even if it's not caused by a cyst or bone spicule.

      There could also be a problem with the tooth next to the one taken out; it may have developed an infection as well (sometimes this happens if the wisdom tooth was infected before it was extracted, but I don't know if this was the case with you??)?

      However, sometimes post-op infections just happen for no apparent reason and can be difficult to get under control. It's important to rule out other causes though, before coming to the conclusion that it's a simple post-op infection.

      Swelling is a red flag that can become a systemic issue if not treated properly; your dentist should be trying different antibiotics to try and get the swelling down ASAP (and stay down permanently). In many cases, dentists may try multiple antibiotics at once - including a certain antibiotic called Flagyl, or Metronidazole, which combats a certain type of bacterial or protozoa present in dental post-op infections, combined with a standard broad-spectrum antibiotic for other types of bacteria that may be present at the same time, such as Amoxicillin or Clindamycin.

      If those therapies fail, he may need to xray the area, make sure no other teeth are involved, and even open it back up and check for missed bone or tissue and clean the infection out.

      If your dentist isn't following this protocol, I'd honestly advise getting a second opinion. After two months, swelling isn't normal and can become dangerous if not treated properly.

      In the meantime, use ice on the outside of your face as much as possible, in addition to taking anti-inflammatory medications such as Ibuprofen. Try not to lie flat when you lie down; this will keep the blood from pooling in that area, causing more swelling. Try to lay on several pillows instead.

  41. QUESTION:
    Does extracting Wisdom Teeth hurt that bad?
    I'm getting mine pulled july 24 and was wondering if its all that bad. Ive heard both sides to it. Im getting all 4 pulled at once, so I can imagine its going to be painful. Anyone else go through this? Just want some info here...
    Im also being completely put out since novacaine and laughing gas dont work for me, at all.

    • ANSWER:
      getting sedated is a great way to get them out, you won't remember a thing! I recommend taking an ibuprofen before you get sedated this will help with swelling later. just use only enough water to swallow the pills b/c you are not to have anything to eat or drink after midnight the night before.

      go to the grocery and stock up on soft cool food, mashed potatoes, soups, ice cream, yogurt, apple sauce, grits, eggs, (slim fast or ensure if you feel you can't eat!!) pudding, etc...think easy to swallow and soft!

      wear comfortable clothing because you will still be really groggy after the surgery. I went home and went back to sleep. I woke up and had some soup and a pain pill and went back to sleep again!!! but everyone is different.

      after they are removed, you will be numb for quite sometime. ONLY eat soft cool food while you are numb. (ice cream, apple sauce, mashed potatoes, milkshake (WITH A SPOON do not suck through a straw), yogurt, etc. things like that. after the numbness wears off you will be able to eat warm foods again...just nothing hard or crunchy.

      you will be given pain pills and i would taken them with an ibuprofen to reduce swelling, pain pills ONLY work on pain, not swelling. you will use ice pack 15 minutes on each side for the 1st day, after that you can use heat packs if you feel you need it. NO swishing or spitting, or smoking the first 24 hours!!!! this will cause a dry socket.

      They will be sore!!!!!! make sure to do warm salt water rinses as this helps it to heal faster and keeps it clean. Please be sure to eat even if you do not feel like it, taking pain pills on an empty stomach will cause you to throw up. you should be able to eat whatever you can tolerate the day or so after. it really depends on you, some people can't eat a burger the next day, others can. if you are still really sore stick to soft foods.....in a few days you will be able to eat whatever you want. just please stay away from hard, crunchy things. they will go over all the instructions with you at the DRs office.

      good luck and rent some movies, lay in bed and relax.

      Top 10 reasons to remove wisdom teeth:

      10. Because there is limited space for wisdom teeth to erupt and because the surrounding gums are difficult to keep clean. Infection and inflammation are therefore common even when there are no apparent symptoms.

      9. Even when wisdom teeth erupt through the gum tissues, they rarely provide any meaningful function and are always difficult to keep clean.

      8. Wisdom teeth have high risk of getting cavities on them because they are very hard to clean while brushing and flossing.

      7. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth develop cysts, and rarely tumours. Removal of such lesions may require extensive procedures to repair and restore jaw function and appearance.

      6. With age, the chance for complications related to the removal of wisdom teeth increases.

      5. Gum disease and inflammation associated with wisdom teeth may lead to receding gum tissues, deterioration of the jawbone and tooth loss.

      4. Wisdom teeth may contribute to crowding of nearby teeth.

      3. Even wisdom teeth that seem to be problem-free remain a breeding ground for oral infection and inflammation. Research supports the concept that such inflammation may enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development and/or progression of a variety of diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

      2. Once it has been determined that a wisdom tooth will not successfully erupt into your mouth and be maintained in a healthy state, early extraction of wisdom teeth is associated with faster and easier recovery.

      1. The number one reason for removing wisdom teeth: Peace of mind!

      Source: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  42. QUESTION:
    I'm getting my wisdom teeth extracted with IV sedation, but I want to remember the procedure.?
    Two of my teeth are impacted and the other two are partially impacted. I am VERY afraid of being unconscious, but they won't let me have just local anesthesia, even though I want to be awake and have no problem with blood or anything. I definitely don't want general anesthesia, so I'm hoping to do twilight anesthesia (conscious sedation). I just want to know other people's experiences with this. Most people I know have had deep sedation, during which they are awake one moment and the next thing they remember is being awake after the procedure, but I don't want this. I want twilight sedation, where you are sedated but are awake enough to remember parts of the procedure and can respond to those around you when prompted. Has anyone had this done? Can you PLEASE tell me your experiences? I'm sooo nervous!! Thank you!!

    • ANSWER:
      If your wisdom teeth are impacted, my recommendation is general anesthesia. Removal of impacted wisdom teeth may not be a particularly gentle procedure, and the oral surgeon may not want you awake and responding to what he/she is doing.

      I have had conscious sedation (Versed) in three different procedures--a urethrotomy, removal of a ganglionic cyst on my hand, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).

      I remember nothing at all about the urethrotomy. When I was being taken to the recovery room I kept asking the surgeon, "Did you change your mind?"

      During the ganglionic cyst removal, I apparently said something irritating to the surgeon, and he had the anesthesiologist increase my Versed dosage. After that, I remembered nothing.

      For the EGD I remember the surgeon yelling at the anesthesiologist, "You gave her too much! You're not supposed to give her so much!" Then I remember her yelling, "Get a biopsy of that!" I remembered nothing else.

      If your oral surgeon recommends general anesthesia, trust him/her that this is for the best. My wisdom teeth were severly impacted, and the surgeon fractured my jaw and destroyed the nerves on one side of my face trying to get the teeth out. I am very glad I was not awake for that procedure, which apparently involved a lot of wrestling and wrenching.

      I have heard stories (from nurses I worked with) about patients under conscious sedation who decided, during the procedure, that it was time to go home now. Sometimes conscious sedation will make you act impulsively, like the woman who had a long one-sided conversation with her surgeon, telling him that she loved him and she was going to buy him a nice Valentine's Day present. Fortunately these patients usually have no memory at all of what they said or did under the sedation.

      My advice is that impacted wisdom teeth extraction isn't something you want to be awake and responsive for. (Have you ever thought about going into the medical field? Perhaps as an anesthesiologist?)

  43. QUESTION:
    white gums after wisdom tooth removal 11 days ago?
    The tooth was encased in bone & had a nerve wrapped around the root. There was a benign cyst on the tooth. I had almost no pain afterwards, took all my meds on schedule and rinsed with warm salt water 3-5 times/day. This morning I noticed that the gums in the front (top & bottom) are white. I'm still pretty tingly on my chin & lip. When I push on the front bottom teeth I don't have full sensitivity and realize that I may have some nerve damage. My main concern is the change in my gums. I am 52 years old.

    • ANSWER:
      I take it you mean your gums above your front teeth, top and bottom, look like they have a white coating over them? You haven't mentioned if you are a smoker, so I'll assume that you are not. The coating is mostly likely dead cells from the extraction socket, these are sloughed off after surgery and can sometimes form a coating over gums OR your tongue. Especially if you are not brushing well because of the soreness from your gums after surgery! A white or coloured coating can also be caused by the mouthwashes used after surgery, as patients often over do it! If you are a smoker, then it's a combination of the byproducts of smoking and the sloughing from the wound.

  44. QUESTION:
    i had lower wisdom teeth removed?
    the one had a cyst under it it was removed also date of removal was 5-23-2006 it did not swell until a day later now the swelling move down that side of my neck the cyst was on

    • ANSWER:
      This is normal. Having teeth removed, especially if there is a cyst involved. is considered surgery. Depending on the level of complication, it could even be considered major surgery. Swelling is ALWAYS worse 1 - 2 days after the procedure is done. Just refrain from smoking, drinking out of a straw, or anything else that requires a sucking action. Also... if you are rinsing with a slat wter solution, make sure it is ONLY 1tsp per full glass of water. Anything more will hamper with the healing process. The things to watch for are... severe pain (ie 8 - 10 on a scale of 1 - 10 with 10 being the worst), a red line going from the area of the extraction down your neck (it would look like someone took a red marker and drew on your skin), or a really bad taste (not like the tase of blood that I'm sure you are experiencing now, but more of a rotting taste) and severe oozing (not like the little bit I'm sure you are seeing now, but enough that you feel like you are swallowing all the time). If ANY of these things happen, call your dentist IMMEDIATELY. Everyone tolerates pain and surgery differently, but these three things are the standard "something is really wrong" markers.

  45. QUESTION:
    Bump under gums after wisdom teeth removal...?
    Hey, so I got all four of my wisdom teeth out about two and half weeks ago and I have noticed that I have a weird bump thing under my gums on my upper left side of my mouth right above the site where they took out my tooth. I have kind of been looking up stuff on what it could be but nothing has really helped. A piece of tooth that they maybe missed? A cyst forming? Infection? Please help me to figure out what it is. I am going to be going back in to get an x-ray and whatnot but it will not be for another 2 weeks or so and I would really like to know what it could be before then. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a canker sore. You should be going back to the doctor to get it checked out soon. If it is there in a couple of days go have it checked. If you have headaches, it could be an infection and doctors maybe able to give antibotics.

  46. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth removal cost?
    All four of my wisdom teeth are showing, pushing my other teeth making them really tight. I went to the dentist today and definitely need them out. I also have a tooth growing above my top left wisdom tooth. She said I needed that out, too before a cyst forms. I am on my mothers insurance (BCBS). I was wondering a ball park range of the cost of the surgery. We live in TN.

    • ANSWER:
      I POST THIS MESSAGE BECAUSE I FEEL IT IS WRONG TO USE A DRUG
      THAT CAUSES PEOPLE TO NOT REMEMBER WHAT WAS DONE TO THEM!!

      If it was me I would not let them use the drug

      Versed ( Midazolam ) for the procedure.

      In fact, many people who use Versed for " IV Sedation,Conscious Sedation" during a procedure are awake for the entire procedure but remember nothing, often believing they were "out" the whole time.

      Versed (Midazolam) is an amnestic. It is also commonly used for minor procedures like setting broken bones,colonoscopies,endoscopies, dental procedures like extractions,conscious sedation,twilight sleep, so that patients won't remember pain and discomfort.HOWEVER THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT THOSE SENSATIONS WILL NOT BE EXPERIENCED!!!!Forgetting does not mean it did not happen!!

      Here is a note from a Dentist Who uses Versed
      I've used Versed 1000+ times during oral surgery procedures and I've never had a complaint. It's a miracle drug because it is safe and it causes you to not remember an unpleasant experience. My answer to him is isn't it better to have not experienced the pain than to have forgot it. No wonder you have had no complaints they have no memory of the procedure..... Arnie

      Why I feel this way about Versed

      My wife had her broken bone(Femur)set in the emergency room just before surgery to repair it. They gave her versed and I waited outside of the room and could hear her screaming in pain,they did not appear to be concerned as they told me she would not remember anything and she did not. BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT IT DID NOT HAPPEN AND THAT SHE DID NOT SUFFER

      Here is a note from someone that did use versed for a dental procedure

      I know I was sedated, I don't remember anything.. but I know I was screaming, everyone could hear me.. My thing is how was I screaming if I'm knocked out.

      I have known people who did remember a bad experience during a colonoscopy. They remember pain and yelling at the Dr. during the exam. When a doctor tells patient's they should have a colonoscopy they are told you won't remember anything and not you will not feel anything.

      My sister in law had her baby years ago and we saw her after the delivery she complained about
      how bad the pain was and had to be restrained.She had twilight sedation and a few hours later
      she had no memory of any of this and thinks she slept thru the whole thing.

      My father had surgery a few years ago and remembered fighting with the anesthesiologist as he was pushing a tube down his throat,after the operation the Dr. said he should not have remembered that.

  47. QUESTION:
    Wisdom teeth swelling again?
    Got my wisdom teeth out 2 weeks and a day ago. Swelling has stopped for a good week, I can open my jaw normal, stitches just disappeared, and I can eat totally normal. One of my lower extraction sites is swollen again and the gum line of my 12 year molar is touching the top of that 12 year molar, to help gauge the swelling. It is a deep, lightly throbbing, weak pain. It hasn't got any worse but I feel like I will wake up in the lorning and it will be bad. Is it an infection? I took all my amoxicillin as prescribed and have been done a good week. I don't think I could have gotten food in the socket seeing as my gum tissue was stitched over it and my cheek was stitched over the socket I never noticed any open socket on either of my bottom teeth like I have on the top. I think it's an infection. My dad has left over amoxicillin that I could take until the morning so I can get a prescription. He has 875mg and I believe I had 500mg. Does 500 sound right for a 6'1" 148 pound 17 year old? Even if it feels better in the morning I will call the dentist to get advice. What do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      Several things can cause swelling after removal of a wisdom tooth; the most common possibility would be a post-operative infection. No matter how much you take care of it at home, the infection can develop due to many factors beyond your control. Once the infection develops, it s internal, so there s no way for rinsing or using the syringe to help (although it won t hurt, and will improve the health of the gum tissue in the area, so I d definitely keep doing it). It sounds like you may have developed a post-op infection that was either resistant to the antibiotic given, and you needed a much stronger antibiotic to resolve the problem, or that you have another factor causing the infection, such as a bone spicule or cyst that was not removed when the wisdom tooth was extracted.

  48. QUESTION:
    Bartholin cyst removal with general or heavy sedation??
    I have a huge bartholin gland cyst (golf ball size) and the doctor is going to remove it in a surgical center due to the size of it. I am being given the choice to either have heavy sedation or general anesthisia and was wondering if anyone has had a removal with either of these. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Depends on your comfort level with surgery.

      For me, I'm a bit skittish and nervous when it comes to going under the knife.

      I had my wisdom teeth removed in two different surgeries. The first dentist used local/general anesthesia and I went into shock. I was absolutely terrified the whole time, my body spasmed in the chair, and the dentist shoved a black rubber stopper in my mouth so I wouldn't bite him. He also grabbed my mouth and shot me up several times with novacaine, not waiting for it to take effect before shooting me up some more. A thoroughly miserable experience. And it took me weeks before I felt like I had fully recoverd.

      The second one gave me generous amounts of laughing gas and I believe I had some sort of medicine that relaxed me as well. The experience was so pleasant, I think I told the dentist I loved him. Ha! I recovered very quickly, too.

      I would personally opt for the heavy sedation so that my body would be more responsive to the surgery, mentally and physically.

      Good luck! :)

  49. QUESTION:
    Is it necessary to get your wisdom teeth out?
    My orthodontist was telling me I should probably get my wisdom teeth out as soon as they start coming in, because by the x-rays they last took they are going to grow in on a slight angle (it's not that big of an angle trust me I barely noticed). The whole thing is, I don't want to get them taken out, after seeing the pain my boyfriend and my brother have gone through with getting theirs out. I have a major phobia of needles and such, hence why i would never get mine taken out if given that choice. Is it REALLY necessary to get your wisdom teeth out? Or are they fine to stay in?

    • ANSWER:
      Top 10 reasons to remove wisdom teeth:

      10. Because there is limited space for wisdom teeth to erupt and because the surrounding gums are difficult to keep clean. Infection and inflammation are therefore common even when there are no apparent symptoms.

      9. Even when wisdom teeth erupt through the gum tissues, they rarely provide any meaningful function and are always difficult to keep clean.

      8. Wisdom teeth have high risk of getting cavities on them because they are very hard to clean while brushing and flossing.

      7. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth develop cysts, and rarely tumours. Removal of such lesions may require extensive procedures to repair and restore jaw function and appearance.

      6. With age, the chance for complications related to the removal of wisdom teeth increases.

      5. Gum disease and inflammation associated with wisdom teeth may lead to receding gum tissues, deterioration of the jawbone and tooth loss.

      4. Wisdom teeth may contribute to crowding of nearby teeth.

      3. Even wisdom teeth that seem to be problem-free remain a breeding ground for oral infection and inflammation. Research supports the concept that such inflammation may enter the bloodstream and contribute to the development and/or progression of a variety of diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

      2. Once it has been determined that a wisdom tooth will not successfully erupt into your mouth and be maintained in a healthy state, early extraction of wisdom teeth is associated with faster and easier recovery.

      1. The number one reason for removing wisdom teeth: Peace of mind!

      Source: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  50. QUESTION:
    What happens if you don't get wisdom teeth removed?
    I have some still, should I get them removed? IF I don't, what will happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Your dick will fall off.

      Seriously....

      Probably nothing. The key word here is "probably:" The question is, are you willing to gamble with your health? I perform a lot of wisdom teeth extractions and I hear your question from many patients. I tell them the following:

      Every treatment decision has to be viewed in terms of potential risks vs. potential benefits. Even when prescribing an antibiotic for infection, we are taking risks (allergic reaction / anaphylaxis, development of resistant organisms, GI problems, etc.). But we know that the potential benefits of prescribing antibiotics far outweigh the potential risks. In most cases, the potential benefits of prophylactically removing wisdom teeth from young people far outweigh the potential risks of removing them. The potential benefits of removing wisdom teeth are significant: avoiding infections, decreasing the possibility of developing cysts and/or tumors that can develop as a result of having impacted wisdom teeth, and so on and so forth. The risks of removal? There are a number of them, and yes, they are significang when they occur. But, they are so rare and so unlikely, that we consider the risks to be low...in most cases in most young patients.

      As you get older, the benefits outweigh the risks less and less. There are times, however, where even in young patients the benefits do not outweigh the risks. Thus, removal has to be decided on a case by case basis.

      If the doctor recommended having them removed (or recommended that you see a specialist for them), then follow his/her recommendations.

      We studied that topic in dental school, and we know what we're doing.


cyst after removal wisdom teeth