Pcos Acne Treatment Natural Acne Treatments

Acne is something that everyone today seems to suffer from. Blemishes occur from what we eat, our body oil, and other factors. It is important to learn how to properly take care of facial skin or other parts of your body and to deal with acne. In fact, it is so common that 80% of all teenage girls and 90% of all teenage boys have issues with their skin and acne problems. Don't forget that acne can occur at any age. The change from being a child to an adult can make the severity of acne worse. You should be able to find many natural acne treatments to help clear up your skin When people think of acne, they think of pimples all over their face, but it doesn't have to be just pimples. There is so much more to acne that most people don't even realize. Blackheads and whiteheads are a form of skin blemishes that can easily be cured. By consulting a dermatologist, you will be given harsh medicines that will usually make your skin problems worse before it actually clears your face. You should try to use a natural acne treatment that doesn't irritate your skin. Many people purchase products that are to be considered all natural acne treatment products. Most natural acne skin treatments products have salicylic acid in them. Salicylic acid is what will make the skin peel to discard any impurities or dead skin cells that are located in inflamed pores. As for herbs, you will find many products contain many different types of herbs and flowers that will add moisture, shine, and will make your skin appear healthier while cleansing the skin of any impurities. The most natural acne treatment for is dieting. By cutting done on fried foods, caffeine, chocolate, carbonated drinks, salt, wheat, and even milk can make acne worse. That's why you should eat more vegetables and fruits instead of salty or sugar packed foods. You may also want to increase your vitamin A, zinc and Vitamin B6 levels in your body. You could take supplements, but by consuming foods that are high in these three vitamins will drastically help your skin condition. It is one of the most natural acne treatments. . Now as for the herbs that can be a natural acne treatment, you will want to use products that have sarsaparilla, yellow dock, burdock, and cleavers in their list of ingredients. These herbs are natural acne treatments. To naturally treat bacteria caused from a blemish, take a drop of tea tree oil to the skin.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Treatment for PCOS?!?
    Hey everyone.
    Okay so i'm 14 years old and i have been doing a lot of research on PCOS on google and youtube.
    I really do think that i have PCOS. Some of my symptoms are;

    -Lots of acne
    -Lots of facial hair
    -Losing hair from head
    -Irregular periods
    -headaches
    -Fatigue

    I heard that this disease can cause very serious things later on in life like heart disease, this REALLY scares me. And also what really concerns me is that my facial hair will get worse and what really worries me is that the facial hair will never go away now because sometimes i wax it i pluck my cheeks and chin sometimes and once you mess with hair it will aways come back no matter what....But who knows, maybe it won't......?!?!?

    Also what really makes me VERY worried is weight gain. Right now i am 5'1, 140 pounds, yes i am about 10 pounds overweight but i don't believe this is from PCOS because i do eat a lot of junk food so i think this is kind of my fault, but i have to say, i do have trouble losing weight and i know that a lot of people with PCOS can gain A LOT of weight fast...Which would be nightmare if it happened to me....

    Anyway, i am going to see my doctor on March 9th and what kind of treatment or method would he give me? And whatever he gives me would it prevent the symptoms of PCOS? Like the facial hair, weight gain and heart disease? I really do NOT want any of this to happen to me what can i do to prevent this from happening? HELP :( !

    • ANSWER:
      Following a strict diet and exercises routine makes a drastic difference. Limiting your carbs, staying away form food dye and corn syrup-which can worsen dark spots and male pattern baldness from the pcos-really helps. Exercising regularly helps get you the hormones the PCOS takes away from you. Also getting on a birth control pill will help you get your period again, lighten dark spots, help with weight loss, help with hair growth, and kind of counteract the elevated male hormones the PCOS gives you. Taking care of your body makes such a difference. Natural foods will help your body work effectively and help with female hormone production. Working out will help increase serotonin levels-serotonin is what makes you feel mentally good and stable and helps with depression and anxiety- working out also helps kick your bodies good female hormone production into gear. It rids your body of toxins and helps you lose weight. It also can help you get your period because your body's endocrine system-the system that provides our bodies with the hormones we need, like estrogen, insulin, dopamine, serotonin- will learn to work more efficiently. It can also help lower your insulin levels which will help lighten the dark thick patches you may find throughout your body. The dark spots are usually caused by unstable insulin and blood sugar levels.

      Getting on a birth control pill, eating right, exercising, staying away from fake unnatural foods, and even taking some herbs and roots will help with counteract PCOS symptoms.

      *EDIT

      PCOS is something you do have to worry about. Having PCOS quadruples your risk for heart related problems, like high blood pressure and heart disease, and triples your risk for ovarian and cervical cancer, it can keep you from having children, and it literally affects every part of your body. From your vision, to your skin, to your joints, to your mental well being, even to your ears. You are at higher risk for infections and skin problems like acne and dandruff; you are at higher risk for dehydration. Your liver, pancreas, kidneys, and thyroid can all be affected. And your endocrine system is what is most affected. Without your endocrine system working properly your thyroid gets affected, without a proper functioning thyroid system and endocrine system, your heart, liver, colon, kidneys, sweat glands, pancreas, digestive system, circulatory system, nervous system, immune system-all of these can be effected. PCOS works against your endocrine system. It can cause simple thing from hot flashes, to cold sweats, to urinary track infections, to headaches, to nausea, to sensitivity to motion, to mood swings, to pimples, to depression, to eating disorders, to metabolic disorders. It can affect your period, decrease/increase your sex drive, make your breasts sensitive, make you get food cravings, cause weight gain, weight loss, affect your appetite. PCOS can affect/give you all these things. Maybe right now you don't feel any of this, maybe right now you are ok, but if you let PCOS go untreated, whether by not eating healthy or exercising, or even not taking certain medication, mark my words your body will be affected. With PCOS your body has to work harder. It has to work harder on insulin production and hormone production. With PCOS your body doesn't work efficiently. I mean it s called a disease for a reason. It is up to you to help your body and work in sync with it.

      Don't get me wrong, just because you have PCOS does not mean you can not live a normal healthy life. It is just that PCOS causes your body to miss out on things it needs and to help your body get those things it needs you need to work with it. You need to give it those things it needs-maybe in the form of medication or natural remedies, maybe from something simple such as diet and exercise.

      I have done a lot of research, talked to many doctors, talked to a nutritionist, a personal trainer, a dermatologist, did some research on how the body and it's systems work, read studies and findings from top medical sites, read books and blogs, watched T.V programs, looked up different medications and remedies. I am not speaking out of my rear here. There are some doctors who don't know some of the stuff I know, and I found that out from a doctor LOL, there are some doctors that will play it down, say that it is nothing to be worried about. It is. I have had for a while now, experienced the worst of its symptoms, and now that I know how to treat it I have seen many improvements. You would be surprised what knowledge can do for you. All in all, take care of yourself. Talk to your doctor, and know your body.

  2. QUESTION:
    29 pcos with acne/breakouts?
    I am 29 female, nearly 30, i was diagnosed with pcos 2 years ago, did have acne and breakouts in my teens and early 20's which by 25 i had a face as clear as a sheet of paper, had a very basic facial routine, and never wore makeup, and whatever else had caused skin problems in past had obviously got better.
    Then after that i started wearing lots of makeup, latre nights out etc, not taking it off or maybe what i used was not good enough.
    Have had family stress and work stress etc, diet not great, and always changing facial products, mostly because of having the desire to go back to how i was a few years ago, just don't know whats gone wrong.
    Have since being diagnosed with pcos given oral antibiotics and topical which helped a little, and the pill cerazzette which probably helped the most.
    Was taken off that last year, have since seen dermatologist who gave me oral topical for am and retin a for pm, both of which i've reduced/stopped using due to it causing severe redness and soreness, and bumps coming up which went away when i stopped or reduced usuage, gp also put me back on pill called marvelon and will be seeing him friday for a review of this.
    I will also be mentioning that dermatologist treatments didn't do a huge amount, and am also thinking about having a allergy test done as they say alot of ingredients in things or foods can trigger it.

    But i need a decent regular skincare routine, not sure if it has to involve cleanse tone moisturise, but at least need a decent makeup remover and cleanser or all in one.
    I know it won't make miracles happen, but i know i need to keep my skin clean.
    I read online a long list of ingredients that are in especially acne prone products which are blocking and irritating the skin more, even though the packaging says oil free etc.

    If anyone can suggest something for acne/brakout prone sensitive skin i would be very greatful.

    Thankyou for reading and i hope i get some decent answers. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      If you love having a beautiful skin or you are trying to get rid of that horrible acne, consider the regular use of natural products which have an extraordinary positive impact on the general aspect of your skin and any acne problem will become a thing of the past. Try ClearSkin-E Cream cause it works for me.

      ClearSkin-E Cream has been especially formulated using natural ingredients especially chosen to soothe the skin and support skin health. Regular use of ClearSkin-E Cream will help to maintain healthy, trouble-free skin all over the natural way. This gentle, yet effective formulation is safe to use for all ages, including babies.

      ClearSkin-E Cream contains the following herbal ingredients (50g) in a cream base:

      Vitamin E oil has been researched for its ability to support healthy skin cells.

      Peppermint essential oil has been studied for its potential to support human health in general.

      Bulbinella (Bulbinella frutescens) is an herb indigenous to Southern Africa and used traditionally in support of skin health.
      Bitter aloe ferox (Aloe ferox) has been researched for its ability to support healthy skin.

      Licorice (Glycorrhiza glabra) has been studied for its ability to help maintain skin health.

      Neem (Melia azadirachta) has been researched for its ability to support healthy skin.

      Elder (Sambucus nigra) has been studied for its ability to support cell strength and integrity.

      Chickweed (Stellaria media) has been researched for its ability to support skin health.

      Chamomille (Matricaria chamomilla) has been extensively researched for its soothing effect on the skin.

      Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) has been researched for its immune supporting properties.

      Cleavers (Galium aparine) has been researched for its ability to support skin and systemic cleansing.

      The products are created using Full Spectrum Approach (FSA), a set of standards and processes that combines the best quality, laboratory-tested, raw ingredients, good manufacturing practices and a Full Spectrum manufacturing method to guarantee you products of the highest quality, safety and effectiveness.
      Read article at http://www.powerfulremedies.com/acne/78-about-skin-health-1310

  3. QUESTION:
    I need help losing weight with PCOS. Help plz!?
    I am 20 and have been told that this is as good as it is going t get. I have PCOS which inhibts my ability to lose weight like a normal person, which sucks. I want to lose some weight so that when I get married I can take everyones breathe away. Just for once I want to be beautiful. I ave tried a number of things but am wondering if there is some miracle workout that can help. I am not afriad of hard work or sacrifice. Please let me know!!

    • ANSWER:
      I would first address the PCOS problem because it can relate to how your body processes insulin. This can cause issues with your weight.

      PCOS is relatively easy to fix. The doctors really do not understand nutrition and so they resort to drugs and this is just not the way to fix this problem.

      This condition creates a high testosterone level in the body and causes severe acne that typical treatments do not fix, problems relating to excess hair growth, and a lot of people with this problem develop type II diabetes. 80% of type II diabetes is caused by a nano bacteria called "nano bacter" that develops because the body doesn't produce enough hydrochloric acid to kill the bacteria in your stomach. The same bacteria causes heart disease and kidney failure. The 50 billion dollars a year Americans spend on Antacids is a crime. The drug companies should be sent to prisons in a 3rd world country for this farce. These antacids destroy the very acid that will stop the indigestion. Lactic acid from rotting food is the real cause, not stomach acid! The stomach acid stops "acid in digestion."

      There is a natural solution to the issue of PCOS that seems to work in many people.

      A protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. Take 1 or 2 tablets per day for one year. You should be able to get this from your pharmacists.

      Make up a mix of equal parts of peony root (Paeonia lactiflora) and licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and take about 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of this 2 to 3 x per day for a maximum of 6 months. You should give this a break for about 1 week every 4 - 6. weeks.

      You should eliminate sugars, breads, and cereals from the diet. These items cause the body to produce insulin to oxidize the sugars and insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are produced as a result. Elevated insulin levels lead to an excess of male hormones.

      Additionally, if you have ANY scars on the front of your body from your forehead down to your anus, this will cause the cells in the stomach that produce the stomach acid to be subdued and you will not be producing enough acid to kill bacteria or digest your food properly. Additionally, an episiotomy scar can reflex to the ovaries and cause cysts to form like the ones that cause PCOS. PCOS is very common in the U.S. where women typically get these episiotomies when in child birth from physicians that have no clue as to the long term effects of them.

      Once the scar is treated, the cysts typically go away.

      My suggestion is that you go to: www.healthline.cc (not .com) and order the following:

      Betaine HCL --- Take 2 to 4 of these AFTER each meal
      Activator --- Take 1 to 2 AFTER each meal
      Digest --- Take 1 to 2 DURING each meal.
      Probiotic --- Take 1 in the morning and 1 in the evening

      This will improve your digestion greatly. Additionally, you should check yourself for iodine deficiency. This can cause hypothyroidism and is a very common reason people in the U.S. get this. A simple evaluation can be done by you if you paint a golf ball size patch of "tincture of iodine" on your chest. If it is still visible after 24 hours you are NOT deficient. If it goes away in a few hours, you are very deficient. ANY fluoride you put into your body from toothpaste, shower in tap water, drink soda pop, anything that contains fluoride will cause you to become deficient in iodine because the body prefers the fluoride over the iodine. Goiters are not uncommon in children that drink fluoridated water. Get a shower filter, drink bottled water without fluoride, don't drink ANY soda drinks, not only will the soda drinks contain fluoride, but they contain phosphoric acid that binds to your minerals like calcium, magnesium, zinc, etc. and deplete your body of these. If you find yourself deficient, you need to purchase some "Xeno Detox" from the healthline company and take 4 capsules in the morning and 4 in the evening for several months or until the "patch test" works for the 24 hour period.

      Do NOT eat ANY SOY! This also depletes your minerals (especially iron) and slows your thyroid down causing hypothyroidism.

      In regard to any scars you have, you will need to extract the toxins to eliminate the reflexing problem. The ancients did this very effectively with highly energized clay. You can purchase this from the healthline company and they will give you instructions on how to use it. It is painless and only takes a short time to do this procedure and it works. Once you have done this, you won't ever have to do it again.

      I am certain if you follow the above advice, you will be amazed at how quickly you can solve those problems. It takes about 3 weeks, typically to solve the PCOS issue by following the above.

      good luck to you

  4. QUESTION:
    Stubborn acne! Anyone else have this problem?
    So I've tried just about everything there is to try before the last terrifying attempt---accutane. I would honestly do ANYTHING to NOT go on this drug. My acne is hormonal, and seems to be the most stubborn and persistent of any in the world. I have had 6, very painful, very expensive treatments of the v-beam with levulan, taken numerous drugs, used prescription topicals, bcps, everything over the counter money can buy...etc. The laser treatment worked for about 5 months and came back worse. Please don't tell me to "see a dermatologist" as I have seen about five, and I am currently seeing one of the best in the country. I am asking this question to see if anyone has had this problem, and how they solved it. MONEY IS NOT A FACTOR. Also it'd be nice to know I'm not alone, because it feels like I am! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Acne that is out of control is the result of a few possibilities. PCOS or cysts on the ovaries can cause out of control acne. If you have oily skin, oily hair, and acne that just can't be controlled using typical methods, then you may have this issue. This can be corrected in about 3 weeks using natural methods because it is a nutritional deficiency problem.

      If you have acne due to intestinal issues that can be corrected by supporting good digestion. A nutritional therapist can help you far more with this problem than a doctor. Doctors use drugs to Treat Symptoms and manage disease. They do not focus on health or CURING anything. Can you name just one disease that has been cured by using drug company medications in the last 200 years? Just one.

      Understanding nutrition will help you greatly solve this problem.

      EDIT: "matador 89" You are way off base recommending medications for this problem. In fact YAZ, that you mentioned along with Yazmin, and Ocela, for example, are the subject of a major class action law suit due to the damage it is doing to women. To join this lawsuit, go to the following web site: http://www.consumerinjuryalert.com/birthcontrol/index.php

      The BAYER pharmaceutical that makes this garbage is NOT a credible company from any standard. Here is a great video for you to watch that gives you incite into how these people think:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wg-52mHIjhs&feature=related

      Listen to the poster here and hear her words "Please don't tell me to "see a dermatologist" as I have seen about five, and I am currently seeing one of the best in the country. I am asking this question to see if anyone has had this problem, and how they solved it." Medical science is NOT the solution to this problem! ! ! The solution I proposed WORKS and works because this problem is a nutritional deficiency problem. I agree with your statement: "ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED." Simply treating the symptoms like medical "professionals" do is not the solution here. Getting to the root cause is the answer. She has clearly tried using medical professionals and they have NOT SOLVED HER PROBLEM.

      good luck to you

  5. QUESTION:
    Should someone who has PCOS?
    Should someone who has PCOS have a gastric bypass? I wasn't diagnosed until last May and have been suffering for 23 years. I am currently 200 pounds overweight & feel extremely oppressed & worn out at the prospect of trying to loose 200 pounds on my own. Any suggestions? Please keep them kind, NOT having a good day.

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS is relatively easy to fix. The doctors really do not understand nutrition and so they resort to drugs and this is just not the way to fix this problem.

      This condition creates a high testosterone level in the body and causes severe acne that typical treatments do not fix, problems relating to excess hair growth, and a lot of people with this problem develop type II diabetes. 80% of type II diabetes is caused by a nano bacteria that develops because the body doesn't produce enough hydrochloric acid as we age. The 40 billion dollars a year Americans spend on Antacids is a crime. The drug companies should be sent to prisons in a 3rd world country for this farce.

      There is a natural solution to the issue of PCOS that seems to work in many people.

      A protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. Take 1 or 2 tablets per day for one year.

      Make up a mix of equal parts of peony root (Paeonia lactiflora) and licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and take about 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of this 2 to 3 x per day for a maximum of 6 months. You should give this a break for about 1 week every 4 - 6. weeks.

      You should eliminate sugars, breads, and cereals from the diet. These items cause the body to produce insulin to oxidize the sugars and insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are produced as a result. Elevated insulin levels lead to an excess of male hormones.

      I suggested this to a woman here on Yahoo some time ago and she followed the suggestion and was over the problem in 3 weeks.

      In regard to being 200 pounds overweight. Do NOT get the gastric bypass. There are other solutions. The diet book by Kevin Trudeau is a very good book, regardless of how you feel about that guy. He doesn't do well speaking what he believes, but this diet he promotes in his book works. I know first hand that it does.

      My girl friend is losing 1 pound per day just like the book says she will. The problem with being overweight is not because you are a bad person that can't control eating or that you have no will power. There is a real reason you gain weight.

      There can be thyroid problems or simply the hypothalamus is not regulated properly. You can change your metabolism and fix the hypothalamus issue with the Trudeau diet. The diet is not his, it was developed by a researcher in Europe that made a huge amount of money on rich people because it worked. You have to follow it exactly and do EVERYTHING it says to do and you will lose 30 - 40 pounds in 45 days. Then you lay off the diet for about 45 days and then do it again. You will lose the weight you want.

      The problem with diets as marketed in the U.S. is that they all have you losing fat that surrounds organs. This is not the fat you want to lose, because you will just gain it back as soon as you stop that diet. The fat you want to lose is the "stored" fat! This fat does not come back after you lose it. It also gets rid of the cellulite!

      Try the diet. It works. Besides, what have you got to lose?

      e-mail me and I will give you some direction on how to fix the digestive problems that are also contributing to the weight issue.

      good luck to you --- don't despair, there is help and it does work. You can fix this issue.

      good luck to you.

  6. QUESTION:
    help treating acne...i have PCOS?
    i've had acne for almost 5 years now and tried just about everything to get rid of it (proactive, neutrogena products, clinique products, chemical peels, masks, isolaz treatments, differin, minocyclin, doxycyclin, ect). however, i recently found out i have PCOS and my hormones are all out of wack. so i was put on birth control pills (ocella..generic of yasmin). i've been on it for a little over a month and there has been no improvement whatsoever, but i'm having other side effects so i want to try a different pill.
    but what i was wondering was is there anything else i can do to try to balance my hormones (i heard something about zinc supplements..?) and get rid of this acne. its already ruined my self confidence and i have prom and other events coming up & i don't want ACNE ANYMOREE!!!!!! :(

    any suggestions are appreciated...please help.

    • ANSWER:
      what is PCOS?ever heard it before! Drinking Aloe Vera Juice w/ MSM powder...I know where u come from, been there done all of those...do this & you'll see the result...ALL NATURAL :)

  7. QUESTION:
    how do u know if u have pcos? symptoms?
    what can high levels of androgen do to the body?

    How to avoid it in a natural way (naturopathic)..

    Thanks..

    • ANSWER:
      There are TONS of symptoms for PCOS. Some of the more common ones are:

      irregular periods, lack of ovulation, depression, skin tags, acne, thinning hair, excess facial/body hair, brown patchy skin in places, excess weight especially in the belly area, and migraines.

      The best way to treat PCOS is with a low carb diet, exercise, and using an insulin sensitizing drug such as metformin. I don't like to take medicines, but I came to the realization that in this case..it really helps and it is helping balance out the way my body should be. I've heard of some more natural ways of treating it, but it is much more difficult and in most cases doens't really work. Some of the other ways are acupuncture, various herbs, cinnamon, progesterone cream. Here's some basic PCOS info and links for you. You might be able to find a little more about natural ways at some of those sites. Good luck.

      I recommend seeing a reproductive endocrinologist. They are generally more knowledgeable about PCOS and the correct treatment. Unfortunately, many doctors are not aware of the proper treatment.

      The underlying cause of PCOS is insulin resistance (IR). The best treatment for PCOS is going on an insulin sensitizing drug such as metformin (1500-2550mg per day) combined with a low carb diet and exercise. There are a few important things to know:

      1. Many women "pass" the test for IR, but still respond positively from the metformin. No one knows exactlly why..my thought is that the test is not a sure fire way of detecting the IR.

      2. You must be on a high enough dose of metformin. I've heard women complain that their bodies dont start working even though they've been on metformin for awhile. Some doctors are hesitant to up the dose past 1500mg...but for some of us it takes more. I don't respond until my dose is around 2000mg a day.

      3. It can take a few months on the correct dose, before your body is regulated.

      4. It is important to treat your PCOS even if you are not trying to get pregnant. There are higher risks for many things (high blood pressure, blood clots, diabetes, and many other things) when you have PCOS, but if it is treated properly, then those risks are lowered.

      When the PCOS is treated properly, all of your symptoms may not disappear, but they should improve some. It will also be a lot easier to lose weight (and keep it off). Our bodies work against us when we try to lose weight on our own, making it nearly impossible to lose weight.

      There are TONS of books about PCOS and dieting. There are two that I recommend. Here's the links at amazon for those:
      http://www.amazon.com/o/asin/0809224275/...
      http://www.amazon.com/o/asin/0007131844/...

      I also recommend a couple web sites:
      http://pcos.itgo.com/
      http://www.inciid.org/faq.php?cat=infert...

      http://messageboards.ivillage.com/iv-bhp... This one is a great message board where you can ask all your PCOS questions or just chat with the women who are also dealing with PCOS. Good luck

  8. QUESTION:
    Advice from other women with PCOS, who have gotten pregnant...?
    What did you do? Were you on medicine? Did you go through fertility treatments? How long did it take you to conceive?

    • ANSWER:
      Everyone with PCOS is different and has different symptoms.

      Here is my story.

      Symptoms:
      Overweight
      Irregular and non existent periods for months
      slightly high testosterone level.
      Acne

      I was orignally put on the pill to get my periods regular well that doesn't work because they are not natural.
      Last year in end sept i started taking Metformin (research this) 1500mg a day. In Oct had no period but started losing weight, acne got better. In Nov i spotted for 2 weeks. In Dec i had my first natural period since going off pill in aug.

      I got pregnant in Jan and now have a healthy 3 week old boy.

      I also followed a low Gi diet, and went to aqua aerobics twice a week. I lost 10 kg and i really think this helped.

      You may not be overweight but metformin may help you because it is the sugar levels in your blood that make the hormones nuts.

      Try looking at these websites they helped me alot.

      www.posaa.asn.net

      www.soulcysters.com

      Good luck.

  9. QUESTION:
    Endometriosis? PCOS?? HELP!?
    I started having pain in my upper right quadrant and lower right rib area about 2 1/2 months ago. It got to the point where I felt as if I had a tumor under my right rib. I went into the ER after being in unbearable pain one day, where the doctors ran tests to see if I had gall stones, hepatitis, or a mass on my liver. They ran ultrasounds and a pelvic, finding out that I had a 3.8 septated cyst on my right ovary, telling me to follow up with a gynecologist for possible hormone treatment in case I had PCOS. This was not my first ruptured, herniated cyst, so I figured I probably have PCOS. I recently went to the gynecologist, who didn't take my insurance, saw me for about 5 minutes before deciding she was going to refer me to a surgeon who could do a laparoscopy to remove an "endometrioma". She just decided on this decision because of the amount of pain I am in. I would rather go about this by having no surgery whatsoever, and by being put on bioidentical hormones. Endometriomas go hand in hand with endometriosis, so I'm kind of worried about my options, as I am only 24 years old and want to have children.

    My hormones have always been out of whack, as I went on the pill within the first two years of originally getting my period, since I was borderline anemic and had severe cramps, some acne, and lots of bleeding. After getting referred to a more natural way of fixing my hormones, I stopped the pill and started on bioidentical hormone treatment, which became expensive and I later stopped doing (since I had to drive far to the dr; they now have many in my area).

    I was wondering if anyone has been in this situation before and what measures they took to correct this??? Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      Honey don't worry, I have endometriosis and PCOS. An expert would be able to tell by the scan wether it was a follicular cyst (common with PCOS) or and endometrioma (sometimes called a chocolate cyst). If it is a chocolate cyst it does need removing by laparoscopy as it won't go away on it's own. It's best to do as they have advised - and they don't do laps lightly.

      PCOS is commonly found in women with very irregular cycles (mine can be anything from 16 days to over 80 days). Also, despite what people think it doesn't have any impact on your ability to conceive. The only difference is it can take a little while longer, and sometimes you need to have a drug to help you ovulate. However, statistically, women with PCOS are just as likely to conceive as women with no problems.

      With endo, it is generally limited to a few area, so if it's on the ovary, it probably isn't anywhere else. Also, women with endo don't have that much less chance of conception than women without it. The only exception is if it is widespread and has dislodged all your organs and solidified them in adhesions. As you have had a scan they know this isn't the case.

      If you want more information about PCOS visit the Verity website, and visit Endo-Resolved as there is loads of information on there about alternative treatments - although like I say, with a chocolate cyst it's probably best to have it removed.

      Take care and don't worry!

  10. QUESTION:
    PCOS Newly Diagnosed and Confused.?
    I'm 21 years old and on June 4th I was diagnosed with PCOS after not having my period for 4 and half months and my blood work results. My doctor didn't explain much to me at all. All she said was that my testosterone levels were elevated and my estrogen was low (I think that's the right words). I have never had normal periods as a teen, this was the third time not having a period over 3 months, my "normal" periods are different every time, never the same time every month, sometimes heavy, some just spotting, some for a few days, others for less than a day and I have been in 3 long term relationships (1 a half years each) where I was having unprotected sex every day, period or no period, and i wasn't getting pregnant. I always thought it was odd, not that I was trying to get pregnant at that time just that it didn't happen, I had brought it up when I was 18 but my doctor told me not to worry about it, When I got home from my apt last week, I decided to do my own research since all my doctor said was to use birth control as my treatment (Beyaz) without explaining my other options. She never told me anything of the information I read. I am 5'4 120 pounds ( very skinny), I have noticed my breasts getting smaller (I was a full C at 17 now I'm a small B), I noticed my acne getting worse, have it on my chest and back as well, also very oily skin, noticed a year ago I had hair in weird spots, thought nothing of it because I am 100%Greek same with the oily skin, i thought its just a greek thing... but it's in between my breasts, around my nipples, around my stomach, and facial hair.. I do not have diabetes type two. I read about infertility and cancer and that's where I started freaking out.

    my questions are : Will I end up getting diabetes type 2? What is Insulin resistance? I saw it mentioned a lot.. 3. is there any diets or medication doctors would let a 21 year old on? My doctor told me I'm too young to be wanting kids anyway and that's why she didn't even discuss anything with me further, just put me on birth control.

    I want something to help regulate my period, and improve my chances in the feature to have children. Something so simple, have a period, and I feel very depressed that I can't even do that. I don't wish to continue birth control, knowing that if I ever get off it that it will not fix the issue makes me want to try and find natural ways. I would try medication that will help me ovulate or bring on a period, but I read that many women get sick from the medication. There must be something natural! Maybe vitamins?!

    If there is anyone that can explain PCOS to me in a language I can understand I would greatly appreciate it! All is research and medical sites have me so confused! I been crying for days now because I don't understand how serious this is or isn't. I read some horrible stories, women who it took 6-10 years to conceive and had to take medications while pregnant, women with PCOS are more likely to miscarry, all this information and I don't know what is true and what isn't. When i looked up natural remedies most was about diet, losing weight and exercise, i have been gaining weight after getting to an all time low from other medications i am on, i was 98 pounds 6 months ago, now im 120 which is a good weight, but i don't want to loose anymore! I already exercise everyday due to a heart condition i have, and the diets seem to all be for diabetes which i do not have! Please help me understand! I have an apt with another doctor next week but would love to hear from people who know either first hand, second hand or just someone who understands the science stuff.

    • ANSWER:
      Finding out you have PCOS can be over whelming especially with all the information out there. Just remember two things:
      PCOS is a syndrome...that means the symptoms can be so varied from person to person. For example, I have insulin resistance but I do not have cysts on my ovaries. My friend, has cysts on her ovaries but does not have insulin resistance.

      The second thing to remember is that when reading anything on the internet that they will list all symptoms and worst case scenarios.

      Your family doctor probably didn't say much to you. I would suggest going to see an Endocrinologist because the cause of PCOS is hormonal.

      You mentioned dieting. Usually that is suggested for those that have insulin resistance. It isn't about losing weight. It is more about finding a diet that limits insulin spikes after eating. With insulin resitance...your body puts out insulin but the cells that use it have a hard time recognizing it. Your body than thinks it hasn't put out enough insulin and puts out even more. So you end up getting a double dose of insulin and because the cells do not recognize it...it stores it as fat. So, while you are still small...you may want to look into some sort of diet to help minimize blood sugar spikes. This can help you avoid type 2 diabetes in the future. ( I use a low glycemic intdex diet or G.I diet).

      Pregnancy is another issue. It really depends on if you are ovulating or not. I wasn't ovulating so I worked with my doctor to make that happen and I am now 6 months pregnant. Some women do have a lot of trouble but others do not.

      Once you have more information you will be able to handle this illness well. I found this video useful: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsNKyKS7M_s

      There is also forum and information site that deals with pcos...it is at www.soulcysters.com

      I also found a PCOS for dummies book which was very helpful as well.

      Good luck.

  11. QUESTION:
    i need help!!!! i have been having acne for months now!!!?
    i have been having acne for months now. i'm 18. i usually get alot on my cheeks :( i hate it! i've used neutrogena oil-free face wash, clearasel, oxy spot treatment, & even proactive!!! none of these products worked :( i even drink alot of water & eat healthy i don't know why i get acne so much...can anyone help me with this problem?? whats the best thing to help prevent acne????

    • ANSWER:
      Try washing your face with soap nuts (sapindus mukorossi), a natural cleaner that comes from a tree. It has antiseptic properties and it will remove enough oil and clean all the dirt without making your skin too dry, which is why the chemicals you are using on your face now aren't helping(NaturOli.com). If your skin gets too dry it produces more oil causing more pimples so your approach becomes counter-effective. Don't use anything else for washing except this and don't wash more than when you wake up and before bed. You can gently apply a little white vinegar diluted with 50% water with a q-tip after washing to close the pores and keep out dirt and oil. If you have a really oily face, at night try putting magnesium on your face (epsom salt or milk of magnesia) and leave it on. I usually do this in the summer time when my face gets more oily naturally but I use the epsom salt mixed with water and make it as saturated as possible so that it is similar in density to an oil. If you wear makeup, check to make sure that is not what is making you break out. Maybe switch to mineral makeup like www.afterglowcosmetics.com that sells makeup to help with acne and rosacea. You can try sulfacetamide-r on your pimples too, but you'd have to go to a dermatologist to get it. That helped me. As far as the diet, unless you are allergic to something you are eating, that shouldn't really affect your acne significantly. If you are low on zinc in the diet that can contribute to breakouts, but if you are eating healthy like alot of fruits and especially green vegetables, you should be ok in that category. Try a colon cleanse, liver cleanse, and parasite cleanse. Toxins in the body can contribute to acne and cleansing the body will help. Try to sweat out the toxins with exercise as well at least a half hour a day. Try dancing or even go to a spa. Are you under alot of stress? Try deep breathing through the nose to help give your brain more nitric oxide to elevate mood. Trust me, my doctor told me that I needed to relax to help with breakouts and he was right. I would consult a doctor before trying anything just to rule out any underlying problems like thyroid, endocrine disorders, ovarian cysts, pcos, or anything else that affects the skin. Remember that the condition of the skin is an indication of your overall health. Good luck and I hope this helps! God bless you!

  12. QUESTION:
    I have PCOS are there Natural remedies or cures 10 points!!..?
    I have bad acne due to PCOS what can i do to make it better???
    what can i do about the abdominal pains???
    also how do you reduce androgen levels???

    • ANSWER:
      Ther is no cure for pcos.or any natural remedies .there ar medicines such as
      ACNE,PREGNANCY AND MENSTRUATION
      Medication is generally prescribed to induce regular periods, thereby reducing the risk of uterine cancer. For acne and excess hair growth, the diuretic spironolactone (Aldactazide) can help. (And for women who desire pregnancy, clomiphene (Clomid) can be used to induce ovulation). To make pcos better you can exercise regularly even if your not overweight this helps the circulation and will improve your skin
      PCOS causes oily skin so you can use cleansers and toners to keep the oiliness under control,

      Studies have indicated that diabetic medications that are designed to improve the action of the hormone insulin may benefit women with PCOS. Long-term trials of these insulin-sensitizing drugs -- such as Avandia (rosiglitazone), Actos (pioglitazone), and Glucophage (metformin) -- for PCOS are underway. The results appear promising. A type of surgery called a "wedge resection" in which a piece of the ovary is removed also helps some women with PCOS.

      LOWER ANDROGEN LEVELS
      There are many treatment options available to provide a hair-growing environment of low androgens and female hair follicle stimulation. Many of these options rely on prescription medications; only one of these medications (Minoxidil) is approved for the treatment of hair loss - the others are all prescribed "off label." Success is often limited by the occurrence of drawbacks, which we have listed below.

      Minoxidil (Rogaine) may bring about only fuzzy growth that does not match existing hair. It is only effective for about 33% of users, and has potential side effects.

      Tagamet (Cimetidine) requires high doses.

      Cyproterone Acetate, usually used to reduce men's sex drive, may be toxic and has long-term side effects.

      Oral Contraceptives must be low androgen index, or will exacerbate the imbalance of low androgens and hair loss will worsen.
      Since there are risks and side effects associated with low androgen and hair loss medications, many patients are turning to all-natural treatments as a hair loss solution

  13. QUESTION:
    Alternative medicine/treatment for PCOS?!? Help please?
    I have PCOS but no problems with my insulin, just my testosterone (too high), FSH, LH levels.

    The dr prescribed bc pills and spirnoalctone, but they will only help with the symptoms and not help the root of the problem.

    I am going to try acupunture to bring my hormones back to normal, but are there other natural ways to bring them back into balance and deal with the symptoms? I have thinning hair on the head, acne, and excess hair.

    BC pills along with any other drugs are out of the question, so any natural alternatives would be appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Forget the holistic scamquackery and take the real medication your trained, licensed physician prescribed.

  14. QUESTION:
    PCOS and natural remedies...?
    I was just recently diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Thankfully my symptoms are mild. I have a little bet of weight gain (im 5"7 and way 150) and my acne is bad. I do have the "ring of pearls" in my ovaries and havent had a natural period since Febuary. My cycles are usually 35 to 38 and lately it has been getting worse. I am 24 years old and I got pregnant on my own when I was 20 and now I have a heathy 3 year old except for her asthma and allergies to everything but is none the less is pretty healthy. My Glucose intolerence test results came back at 81. My RE said that that was a high normal. I want to know if there is any natural remedies for my symptoms?? {;ease help!

    • ANSWER:
      Herbs are extremely useful in treating PCOS. Making changes and adding supplements to your diet will help control weight and balance blood sugar, while herbs go a step further, targeting any problems involving hormone balance.

      * Chaste tree (Vitex Agnus castus) is one of the most important herbs for PCOS because it helps stimulate and normalise the function of the pituitary gland, which controls the release of luteinising hormone (LH). Chaste tree has been successfully trialled in the treatment of PCOS as well as infertility. It enhances progesterone levels, which lengthen the menstrual cycle. Chaste tree has been shown to improve fertility due to its effects on decreasing oestrogen and androgens which, when elevated, are responsible for cycles with no ovulation (anovulation).

      * Adrenal tonics such as Rehmannia, Rhodiola, Siberian Ginseng and Withania support the adrenal stress response and help the adrenal glands return to a state of balance.

      * Paeonia lactiflora (peony) is another valuable herb as it positively influences low progesterone, reduces elevated androgens (testosterone) and modulates oestrogen and prolactin.

      * Licorice, especially combined with peony, helps regulate hormones, reduce androgen levels and improve the LH to FSH ratio.

      * Gymnema is helpful in reducing carbohydrate and sugar cravings, thereby assisting in weight loss. Gymnema is one of the most significant herbs to improve insulin resistance.

      * Tribulus helps restore menstrual regularity and regulate ovulation.

      * Blue Cohosh is a particularly useful herb. It acts as a uterine and ovarian tonic and a pelvic anti-inflammatory.

      * Saw Palmetto, a traditional male reproductive herb used to control excess testosterone, offers promising results for hirsuitism.

      * Milk thistle, rosemary, Bupleurum and Schizandra are excellent liver herbs, aiding in the removal of excess oestrogen.

  15. QUESTION:
    Is there a natural alternative to metformin without the side effects?
    I have been takin metformin for PCOS for a little over a month and am so exhausted I can barely stay awake for more than a few hours most days. I just want my energy back.

    does anyone know of some vitamin or something that works the same way (or better) but wont cause the same side effects?
    Thanks everyone for your support and very good information! :)

    Dave
    I'm sorry but I think you misunderstood me. I do not want to mix anything. I just want something to take INSTEAD of metformin. And I also just wanted to mention that metformin is not the answer to polycystic ovarian syndrome for everyone. It is not even approved by the FDA to be given for PCOS.

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (POS) is certainly a popular diagnosis in recent years, and often the diagnosis may be incorrect. At any rate, PCOS is a syndrome, not a disease. This means that it is reversible. Although it is not yet completely understood, one thing we do know: it responds very well to natural treatment.

      The use of Metformin indicates that you are being treated for Type I (Insulin Resistant) PCOS. Metformin does indeed usually come with side effects (as does just about all of those unnatural drugs the mainstream tools like to promote here despite this being the Alternatives section and the questions, like yours, seeking answers to help avoid such drugs and side effects). The most common side effects of Metformin are nausea, diarrhea and abdominal bloating.

      Fortunately, there are natural alternatives to metformin which lower blood sugar as well, if not better, than Metformin, without the side effects.

      Classic PCOS has the symptoms of weight gain, failure to ovulate, infrequent periods, infertility, facial hair, acne, hair loss and a predisposition to diabetes. They key feature is high testosterone on blood test.

      The high testosterone is actually the side effect, rather than the cause. In type 1 PCOS, The real underlying issue is insulin resistance. It is insulin that inhibits ovulation and causes the ovaries to produce testosterone. It is insulin that is the main cause of weight gain. The symptoms of excessive testosterone, such as acne and facial hair will improve when insulin sensitivity improves.

      Insulin resistance is caused by: too many carbohydrates in the diet (about 30% of the population cannot cope with a "normal" amount of bread and sugar), damaged vegetable oils called trans fat, rnvironmental toxins and birth control pills.

      Before we look at the supplements though, we should consider dietary concerns. When the body is insulin resistant, it simply does not remember how to use carbohydrates for energy. It can only store them as fat. At the same time, an insulin resistant body does not have the ability to burn fat stores for energy. The solution is to restrict carbohydrates for six weeks to "remind" the body how to use them for energy. You may need to go down to 30 or 40 grams of carbohydrate per day, but you still must eat vegetables for their fibre and nutrition. Your best source of calories during this time is fat, not protein. Protein puts a stress on the kidneys, and is also converted easily into sugar, whereas fat is simply burned for energy.

      Now, as for the natural supplements and items which can help lower blood sugar:

      Magnesium. Fully 90-95% of us are deficient in this vital mineral, and one of its functions is to improve sensitivity of the insulin receptor.

      Iodine and Vitamin D3. Deficiencies in both of these vital items are common and can lead to insulin sensitivity and hormoanl problems. Take plenty of both (Vitamin D3 can be obained in plentiful amounts from a daily exposure to sunshine)

      In women, iodine's ability to revive hormonal sensitivity back to normal significantly improves Insulin sensitivity and other hormones.

      GTF Chromium (Glucose Transport Factor Chromium) - The primary role of insulin is glucose transport is the primary role of insulin, chromium's main function is increasing insulin's efficiency in regulating blood sugar levels. In one study of 180 men and women with Type II diabetes, researchers divided the subjects into three groups, each receiving twice daily doses of either 200 mcg or 500 mcg of chromium or a placebo. The patients were allowed to continue with their usual diet and medications. At the end of two months, those who took 1,000 mcg of chromium daily showed significant improvement in insulin response, the number if insulin receptors, and levels of blood lipids (fats and cholesterol)0. It took four months the group taking 400 mcg chromium daily to improve as much as the higher dosage group. However, all the patients taking chromium showed measurable improvement in their diabetes-related symptoms

      Source: "Chromium in the Prevention and Control of Diabetes" by Richard A. Anderson, PhD, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 1998

      Digestive enzymes help the body better process sugar and the use of food enzymes decreases that rate of exhaustion, and thus, results in a longer, healthier, and more vital life.

      Pycnogenol - Pycnogenol is a powerful antioxidant derived from French maritime pine tree bark and the subject of more than 180 studies over 35 years which has been shown to reduce high blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose without affecting insulin levels.

      Bitter Guord - Make a watery juice of a small Bitter Guord (remove seeds) and drink every morning.

      Gymnema Sylvestre - Is a plant that grows in the tropical forests of central and southern India and in parts of Africa. Herbalists in India have used the leaves of this long, slender plant as a treatment for diabetes for more than 2,000 years. The Hindu word "gumar," which means "sugar destroyer," describes the primary use of the herb in traditional Indian medicine. So strong is this herb that powered gymnema root has also been used to treat snake bites, constipation, stomach complaints, water retention, and liver disease. Doctors in India note that Gymnema Sylvestre is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and in food additives against obesity and caries.

      Prickly Pear Cactus (Nopal) - Prickly pear could reduce blood sugar rises after a meal by up to 50 per cent according to a recent study. Prickly pear cactus is widely used to control blood sugar and diabetes and the cactus pads are consumed regularly in Mexico,.

      Blackseed Oil (Nigella Sativa) - Also called black cumin seed (be sure that it is Nigella sativa regardless of what it is referred to as). Blackseed oil is legendary for its medicinal properties and has been used for thousands of years (Click here for more information). Preliminary research in animal trials has shown that that an extract from Nigella sativa seeds can reduce elevated blood sugar levels.

      Fenugreek seeds are also proven to help reduce blood sugar. Soak fenugreek seeds in about one teaspoon in water at night, drink that water in the morning and chew and eat the soaked seeds.

      Green plaintain peels - Wash a green plantain and peel it, then put the peel in a jar and cover with water. Let sit overnight, and then drink this water three times a day. Lowers your blood sugar level. Keep drinking as needed and change the peel every other day and refill the jar with water.

      Alpha Lipoic Acid speeds the removal of glucose from the bloodstream, at least partly by enhancing insulin function, and it reduces insulin resistance. The therapeutic dose for lipoic acid is 600 mg/day. In the United States, it is sold as a dietary supplement, usually as 50 mg tablets. (The richest food source of alpha-lipoic acid is red meat but to insure proper health, use lean cuts of organic beef that has not been subject to antibiotics or feed lot practices).

      Cat s Claw Used by indigenous tribes in Peru and South America to treat diabetes. Available at health food stores.

      Cinnamon - Cinnamon has been shown to help regulate blood glucose levels and several studies indicate that it may be helpful against diabetes, particularly type II diabetes.

      Other Good Foods and Supplements - Almonds, apples, oranges, coconut oil, and substances high in omega three oils (olive oil, flaxseed oil, fish oil, borage oil).

  16. QUESTION:
    PCOS - increasing odds of conception?
    Does anyone have any tips for conceiving while suffering from pcos? I was diagnosed 2 years ago and am now trying for a baby. I try to be as holisitic as possible.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      One of the first things to consider with PCOS is weight management. Most women with PCOS are overweight or obese. This is usually due to insulin resistance, which is thought to cause most cases of PCOS. Insulin resistance is a state in which the cells do not respond to insulin as efficiently as they should, so the pancreas secretes more and more insulin in an effort to keep glucose levels within a normal range. This results in excessive insulin floating around in the body. The excess insulin is thought to affect the ovaries, causing them to produce too many male hormones. From the male hormones you get some of the classic PCOS symptoms: acne, hirsutism, irregular cycles, infertility, thinning hair. From the insulin resistance, you get the others: unexplained weight gain, difficulty losing weight, acanthosis nigricans (patches of dark skin), skin tags. So for many women, treating the underlying insulin resistance can help with PCOS symptoms and with fertility.

      Women with PCOS are usually advised to follow a low-carb, diabetic diet and exercise regularly. Losing weight can help with insulin function and can help restore ovulation, and it can help improve your overall health. But for many of us, weight loss is either very difficult or not sufficient to restore ovulation.

      Metformin (glucophage) is often used in women with PCOS to treat insulin resistance. By treating this problem, many women find that they begin ovulating and have less difficulty losing weight. It is a relatively safe, inexpensive, and quite successful treatment for PCOS, and many patients are able to conceive while using it.

      For those who could not conceive on metformin, the fertility drug Clomid is often used. Whereas metformin is not a true fertility drug, Clomid is because its sole purpose is to cause ovulation. Some women with PCOS may need multiple cycles of Clomid before becoming pregnant. Clomid is sometimes used in conjunction with metformin.

      The most "natural" way I know of to improve your chances of conceiving would be to develop a diet and exercise plan with your doctor, or with a nutritionist who is familiar with PCOS, with the goal of weight loss. If you need medicine, however, metformin is helpful for many women with PCOS.

  17. QUESTION:
    Looking for some answers for PCOS?!?!?!?!?!?
    I'm wondering if anyone has had these details with PCOS and looking for a support grop that works.
    I just found out a week ago that I have PCOD, although like many of you I've been trying to tell my doctor for a few months now that I have this due to my research and in the past had told doctors that my hormones were messed up due to never having any acne until I was 17 (only on my chin and sides of mouth) and messed up periods after going off birth control....for awhile I just thought my body was messed up from being on the pill because the first time I went off when I was 18 I didn't have my period for 4 months. My doctor told me that was normal even though I had only been on the pill for about 8 months and that some women do not get their period for a year after going off...anyway he put my back on and things went back to normal until a year ago when I went off after getting married to try and conceive. We have been trying now for about 7 months...because I was told by some to wait until my periods were normal and they never were...I'm pretty sure that I've only had one "normal" period since then the others were all very short and light happening about every 31-48 days. This has been my longest cycle ( my last period was June 1) so my doctor has put me on ratio-mpa and next week I start metformin.
    I also have been going to nat path who thought too that I had PCOD. I tried Vitex a nat. herb to try and reg. my periods although that didn't work. I did find through her though that sugar and dairy seem to make acne worse. I hardly have any dairy now and when I have sugar I try to only have natural ones like honey and golden cane in sm doses. A lot of dressings and that you can get from nat. food stores without sugar. I have rice milk or almond milk too instead of cows...I never knew that they inject hormones into cows.
    For symptoms...I have only gained about 15 lbs since I was 17/18 I'm not overweight because I am pretty active although this is considered chubby for me in my frame. I can't loose weight for the life of me unless I pretty much don't eat any carbs and do high intense cardio which isn't worth the burnout that my body goes through. lets just say during the summer I played soccer 2 times a week (running in midfield for 80 mins a game), watched everything that went into my mouth, went to the gym 2-3 times a week for an hour at a time and walked/ did videos for a couple times a week and my weight didn't move...so I wore the biggest sizes that I've ever worn as bridesmaid dresses in 2 weddings. I have thin hair on my forehead on the sides and tend to loose hair through washing. I have pimple year around on my chin and sides of mouth but I';m able to control them with specto gel and not eating sugar and dairy ( before used prescription clinodoxyl gel). I get pimples from sports on my chest and back sometimes in the summer and use a body wash for pimples and get my husband to put tea tree oil on these which helps. I have irr. periods and PMS symptoms that last about 2 weeks before each period. When I wen't off of the pill I was having panic attacks for the first time in my life about nothing. I also have blonde hair above my upper lip...thabnk god I'm a blonde, but there is more hair there then any of my g/f's. Nothing showed up in my blood work although I have multiple cysts on my ovaries that showed up in m,y ultrasound.
    It is okay to share this.
    I am going to see my family doc in a month and my nat. path doc. whenever I get my next period. I will keep you posted...I'm planning on asking my nat. doc about herbs etc that can help with later comp. that occur with this such as heart problems and diabetes also about cinnamon.
    Emily c

    • ANSWER:
      Based on my reading, the best treatment for PCOS is not a medication, but the same treatment for type two diabetes. Lean, healthy (vegetable based) diet, lots of exercise, and weight loss. If these things are half as effective at treating PCOS as they have been for helping me with my type two diabetes, then you should see remarkable results in only a couple of months. Read more here: http://pcos.insulitelabs.com/What-Causes-PCOS.php
      http://www.ovarian-cysts-pcos.com/PCOS-success.html
      And here: http://www.drmcdougall.com/med_hormone.html

  18. QUESTION:
    why clots ,scanty periods after treatment of polycycstic ovaries and facing it after 3 regular normal periods?
    well i had poly cystic ovaries.took dronis(medication) for regular 3 months then after i had normal regular periods for last 3 months but now this month i faced blood clots and bit scanty period.I am so scared that i am nervous and very tensed please help me out. what should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there

      Well, the answer is simple. You still have PCOS. This is not something that can be "cured" as such, rather it can just be controlled. The medication you took just helps to balance your hormones and make your periods regular, but it's just masking the underlying problem. Now that you have stopped taking it, your hormone levels have gone out of balance again.

      PCOS is something that you have to live with, but it can be controlled either through medications and/or through diet. The root cause of PCOS is something called insulin resistance, which means that you have higher than normal levels of insulin (especially after eating). The elevated insulin messes with your ovaries and sends your hormones out of whack (low progesterone, high testosterone, high LH).

      How you treat PCOS depends on what your goals are. If you are trying to get pregnant that's one thing, if you want to lose weight thats another, or if you have acne or excess hair, then thats yet another. The best way to control PCOS is to control the root cause - insulin levels - either using a drug like metformin or through a special diet (a low glycemic index diet together with a diet rich in a natural compound called "d chiro inositol"). Regular exercise can also help control PCOS.

      The blood clots and scanty period are nothing to worry about in themselves. They are just a consequence of your hormone levels, and will normalise again once you get your hormones back in balance.

  19. QUESTION:
    would ovarian cyst treatment and medication hurt or have side effects on future pregnancy or the baby?
    medication (metforal, aldactone ,androcure, yasmin) for over a year now

    • ANSWER:
      Please, do yourself a huge favor and deal with the PCOS problem in a nutritional way and solve the problem. Doctors use drugs and surgery as their solution to issues like this and all that does is give you "make believe health."

      "Normalizing" hormones by simply giving you synthetic hormone pills (birth control pills) violates the basic principle of healing. Instead, whenever possible, you should strive to normalize the hormones on your own. In your case, by changing your diet, you can start on the road to healing.

      The reason why changing to a diet based on the principles of "Nourishing Traditions," a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, "The Schwarzbein Principle" which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, "Nourishing Traditions," along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients that I have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis--the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs. You should be able to get the Symplex F from your local pharmacy.

      The final therapy that I recommend for PCOS is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct amounts that were also indicated in these studies. I recommend the Mediherb extracts and suggest 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually suggest using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks."

      The last girl I suggested this too, had complete change in acne production, her hair became normal, and she lost her oily skin in 3 weeks. Her next concern was to ask me how to get rid of the acne scars from the PCOS she had suffered with for several years. She said doctors were no help to her and she was at her wits end.

      Birth control pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you the "make believe health" and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works in regard to nutrition that nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it with drugs.

      This solution is not expensive, by the way, and you should see results in a few weeks. I would strongly suggest you work with a Certified Nutritional Therapist to build your health and to help you through the pregnancy to assist you in diet and nutritional advice to give you the best chance of having a healthy baby. Doctors are NOT trained in nutrition and I find they generally give bad nutritional advice to expectant mothers.

      EDIT: To address the other poster: Yes, it is strongly suggested you work with a nutritional therapist with this issue to monitor the progress, etc. and as I said, it is also important to use the exact amounts of product for best results. I would be interested in any literature indicating licorice to be associated with miscarriage. That is not well known in the literature and I suspect it is from excessive use.

      This protocol has been used very successfully on many, many patients with great success. The results happen within a few weeks that are dramatic.

      good luck to you

  20. QUESTION:
    Is it possible that I could have PCOS?
    - I a lot have acne. (pimples, blackheads, whiteheads and zits) My mom and brother don't have acne at all, when my mom was a teen.. she barely had pimples, if she did..it'll be one or two and it'll just go away within 2 days. I think my dad had acne, but not so severe.
    - I have oily skin! I stick to washing my face sometimes.
    - I'm not overweight, when I was younger.. I always had a normal BMI.
    - My hair is pretty thin but It's not falling out.
    - I have irregular periods, I have my period every 3-4 months, In september when I get my period then next month when I get my period. It's only on Sept-Oct.

    I just found out about this and I was looking at the symptoms and I actually found a few. Can this be possible? I'm scared! I'm only 14 years old... I had my period when I was 11 and my cycle is always like that since I first got my period.

    • ANSWER:
      Honestly PCOS is linked to many symptoms. I know for me the only detection was the irregular periods, it took my going to the doc and I was diagnosed with pcos. The good news is there are so many things out there to help you regulate your cycle. From of course medical treatment which is most recommended.. But if want to got he natural route you can try natural herbs like mara root, vitex, research them and see the reviews of many women who have been able to regulate their cycles and many others have conceived. I know that a healthy balanced diet and exercise is a big part of bettering pcos condition.

      Good luck!

  21. QUESTION:
    Repost:Women with PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome)?
    What were your symptoms ir what are your symptoms and when did they start? I'm a little concern because my period has been regular up until May...I need some information. When did you go to the doctor and how do you cope? How does it make you feel to know that you may not be able to get pregnant naturally? I'm so stressed out right now and scared. Thanks in Advance!!!

    I know the best thing to do is to go to the doctor but I just wanted to hear from women who is going through the same thing. I'm just worried because I really want children. Now and naturally. I don't know if it pcos yet..But I'm guessing it is.I'm so sad right now and so sleepy but I can't sleep.
    Thanks everyone! You guys are really helping me a lot with all your advice and personally experiences. I really appreciate all of it...I truly do.

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS is difficult to decipher (without a work-up) simply because for everyone it's different, that's why it's a syndrome. The symptoms can differ from person to person. Symptoms associated include hirutism, alopecia, obesity (though some women are of normal weight), acne, dandruff, lack of or irregular cycles. It's really all over the spectrum, the only way to really get a grasp on whether you have it or not is to have blood work and an ultrasound. I was diagnosed in 2003 and have since conceived two pregnancies (via fertility treatment) and a third naturally. The stress is something that will come into play in terms of wanting to have children, as to conceiving naturally it didn't really bother me. I wanted to experience pregnancy and didn't really care how I conceived (I saw a reproductive endocrinologist and used gonadatropin therapy). I was just as happy with medically conceived pregnancies as I have been with my current (which was natural). I love my children regardless. If you do have it, just educate yourself on the long term effects of PCOS (diabetes, uterine cancer, etc) and try to find yourself a good PCP to monitor your health beyond your reproductive issues. You might just simply experiencing missed cycles due to physical conditions (not related to PCOS) or stress, no reason to get too worked up until you know for sure. Check out soulcysters.com for a good forum/information on PCOS. good luck.

  22. QUESTION:
    How do you deal with PCOS?
    I am a 19yr old female and I was told I had PCOS when I was 17.
    I was put on the pill as my testostarone was way too high, I was also told that I was highly insulin resistant!
    The pill has cleared my skin up and the unwanted hair growth yet my periods are still irregular and I have gained 40kgs in the last 3yrs.
    How do I loose weight, I have tried everthing?

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS refers to multiple cysts on the ovaries and a host of other
      problems that go along with them, including anovulation (lack of
      ovulation) and menstrual abnormalities, hirsutism (facial hair), male pattern baldness, acne, and often obesity. Such women may also have varying degrees of insulin resistance and an increased incidence of Type II diabetes, unfavorable lipid patterns (usually high triglycerides), and a low bone density.
      Laboratory tests often show higher than normal circulating androgens, especially testosterone.

      PCOS occurs when a woman doesn't ovulate, which causes a disruption in the normal, cyclical interrelationship among her hormones, brain and ovaries. Normally, the hypothalamus, a regulatory center in the brain, monitors the hormone output of the ovaries and synchronizes the normal menstrual cycle. When monthly bleeding ends, the hypothalamus secretes gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland in the brain to release follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). These hormones direct an ovary to start making estrogen (mostly estradiol), and stimulate the maturation of eggs in about 120 follicles.

      The first follicle that ovulates, releasing its egg into the fallopian tube for a journey to the uterus, quickly changes into the corpus luteum, which is a factory for making progesterone, and raises
      progesterone's concentrations to 200 to 300 times higher than that of estradiol. This huge surge of progesterone simultaneously puts the uterine lining in its secretory or ripening phase, and turns off further ovulation by either ovary.

      If fertilization does not occur, the ovary stops its elevated production of both estrogen and progesterone. The sudden fall in the concentrations of these hormones causes shedding of the blood-rich uterine lining and bleeding (menstruation). Then, in response to low hormone levels, there is a rise in GnRH and the cycle starts all over again.

      But what happens to this cycle if, for some reason, ovulation is
      unsuccessful? For example, if the follicle migrates to the outside of the ovary, but does not "pop" the egg and release it, the follicle
      becomes a cyst, and the normal progesterone surge does not occur. The lack of progesterone is detected by the hypothalamus, which continues to try to stimulate the ovary by increasing its production of GnRH, which increases the pituitary production of FSH and LH. This stimulates the ovary to make more estrogen and androgens, which stimulates more follicles toward ovulation. If these additional follicles are also unable to produce a matured ovum or make progesterone, the menstrual cycle is dominated by increased estrogen and androgen production without progesterone. This is the fundamental abnormality that creates PCOS.

      ****An alternative treatment for ovarian cysts is natural progesterone. ****

      The signaling mechanism that shuts off ovulation in one ovary each cycle is the production of progesterone in the other . If sufficient natural progesterone is supplemented prior to ovulation, LH levels are inhibited and both ovaries think the other one has ovulated, so regular ovulation does not occur. (This is the same effect as contraceptive pills.) Similarly, the high estriol and progesterone levels throughout pregnancy successfully inhibit ovarian activity for nine months. Therefore, adding natural progesterone from day 10 to day 26 of the cycle suppresses LH and it s luteinizing effects.

      Thus the ovarian cyst will not be stimulated and, in the passage of one or two such monthly cycles, will very likely shrink and disappear without further treatment.

  23. QUESTION:
    Women with hormonal imbalance and hormonal acne?
    I am curious to know if anyone has used Saw Palmetto for hormonal imbalance and acne. How did it work for you, what were your side effects and did you use any other herbs.

    I appreciate any personal information on Saw Palmetto or any other treatments that have worked for you.
    I took birth control pills for 6 years, they are the reason behind my hormonal imbalance unfortunately. I stopped taking them in December of 2012, since then I've had so many terrible symptoms.

    • ANSWER:
      I have not used saw palmetto but i have been on spironolactone (saw palmetto is considered the "natural" form of spiro). I dont recommend messing with supplements like this unless you get your own hormone levels tested to figure you whats going on (way to easy to misdiagnose yourself from crap you read online). Taking saw palmetto in an effort to block androgens (cause that's what it technically should do) could further upset your balance so getting your own levels tested is key. You can also get tested for PCOS and go back on birth control, cause its probably not gonna correct itself. Before you go blaming yourself for taking birth control in the first place, you'd be surprised how many women suffer hormonal imbalance and acne through their twenties thirties and forties despite the fact that they never got it as teens. Usually birth control is the only solution so you might've actually staved off acne for those six years you took it. And its also true that hormones fluctuate and change after pregnancy and stuff like that so they aren't just gonna go back to how they were before you took birth control (sucks, I know, but it happens).

      One thing you can try right now is vitamin D. Vitamin d is a pro hormone and it plays a big role in regulating all of your hormones on top of being really important for your immune system. Try it--especially if you never hang out in the sun without SPF on or being covered.

  24. QUESTION:
    I Have a Question about PCOS?
    It stands for Polycystic ovarian syndrome. My GYN said I had it and put me on birth control to regulate me and it worked for a while but I HATE taking pills with a passion and I stopped. I haven't had a period since. Is that bad for my body? I don't plan on ever having kids. Will I eventually have my period without it? I need some advice please.
    By the way I have tried being on Patches and I got chest pain. Does anyone know why that would happen?

    • ANSWER:
      To tell you the truth, putting someone with PCOS on the pill is a very lazy way to treat it, and it often eventually makes the condition worse. If you don't want to take the pills, don't. But, also be sure to take care of your PCOS in another way. I strongly recommend that you find a doctor who is willing to treat it more naturally.
      Eating low-carb and exercising daily are the two best ways to treat PCOS naturally. They both do wonderful things for insulin problems, weight problems, menstruation, acne, hair loss, everything...
      Many doctors will also use progesterone therapy instead of birth control pills. It's a much healthier way to go about it, and it can definitely help with menstruation. You can actually do it on your own using a high quality progesterone cream that you purchase OTC, typically applied for 14 days per month. I hope that you will ask a doctor about it before beginning, though, because tampering with hormones isn't a good idea unless you know what you're doing.
      In any case, find a doctor who won't just throw you on birth control pills. Honestly, that translates to "I don't care very much about your condition." There are tons of treatments that are more beneficial in the long term. There are also many natural supplements that can help with symptoms, such as saw palmetto capsules that act as androgen suppressants.
      Please be aware that progesterone cream, low-carb dieting and exercising can all increase the likelihood of conceiving, so be sure to protect yourself in other ways.

  25. QUESTION:
    Hormonal unbalance the cause of my acne?
    I'm pretty sure it is, i mean i never doubted it. I just never payed that much attention to the fact of that being the cause of my acne. I'm 16 and i have extremely oily skin. I am weird because i break out more on my back and chest rather then my face, my face is usually nearly 100 percent clear. My back and chest are just awful though. I use many cleansers and i take antibiotics but really nothing is working, just swimming and tanning but even then its only temporary. Anyways, moving on with life. Is there any way i can balance my hormones, not just for acne but for the fact i have been really cranky and stressing like a b!tch. The more acne i get the more i stress out! so any suggestions on what can balance my hormones and do you think it will help with my skin? Do you think it is also the cause for my extreme oily skin?

    • ANSWER:
      I would try and go see a doctor or endocrinologist first off. They can tell you more about what is really going on with you. I have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) which gives you some of the symptoms you were talking about. There really isn't any exact diagnosis for it, it's really just based on your symptoms and hormone levels. I definitely have more acne on my back and chest than my face, and it's come and gone throughout my life. To just treat that I would try Tazorac which you'll have to get from a dermatologist. It's the only thing that's really helped me. But besides the acne PCOS can give you depression, weight problems, really irregular periods, and extra hair. Not all women with PCOS have all those things though. So anyways if any of that sounds like you I'd go talk to a doctor. The treatment for such things is usually birth control pills. I'm trying natural progesterone cream instead because honestly I don't want to be on birth control pills forever. And there are other things you can do like trying to stay away from refined carbohydrates.

      Sorry that's probably more than you wanted. Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    PCOS & depression symptoms?
    I have PCOS & recently have been experiencing signs of depression. Last night I was watching a show & they said that 50% of women that have PCOS suffer from depression. I don t want to rush into taking more prescriptions. I am already taking 3 prescriptions a day. Does anyone have any of ideas of ways I can treat the symptoms of depression w/out a prescription? Vitamins, homeopathic, or natural treatments? It isn t severe depression. No thoughts of suicide. But I have been down, extremely tired, loss of appetite, loss of interest in things I used to enjoy, & worst of all, loss of libido.

    • ANSWER:
      Please, do yourself a huge favor and deal with the PCOS problem in a nutritional way and solve the problem. Doctors use drugs and surgery as their solution to issues like this and all that does is give you "MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH."

      "Normalizing" hormones by simply giving you synthetic hormone pills violates the basic principle of healing. Instead, whenever possible, you should strive to normalize the hormones on your own. In your case, by changing your diet, you can start on the road to healing.

      The reason why changing to a diet based on the principles of "Nourishing Traditions," a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, "The Schwarzbein Principle" which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, "Nourishing Traditions," along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients that have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis--the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs. You should be able to get the Symplex F from your local pharmacy.

      The final therapy that I recommend for PCOS is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct amounts that were also indicated in these studies. I recommend the Mediherb extracts and suggest 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually suggest using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks."

      The last girl I suggested this too, had complete change in acne production, her hair became normal, and she lost her oily skin in 3 weeks. Her next concern was to ask me how to get rid of the acne scars from the PCOS she had suffered with for several years. She said doctors were no help to her and she was at her wits end. All the drugs given to her by doctors had lots of side effects that she hated.

      Birth control pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you more "make believe health" and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works in regard to nutrition that nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it with drugs.

      This solution is not expensive, by the way, and you should see results in a few weeks.

      Please note that ALL of your steroid hormones come from cholesterol. ALL OF THEM. Estrogen, testosterone, aldesterone, progesterone, pregnenalone, cortisol. If you are deficient in these, you will have NO LIDIDO. Also, avoid all soy because things like TOFU stop your lidido as it was originally designed to do for the monks it was originally made.

      good luck to you

  27. QUESTION:
    My doctor says I don't have PCOS, I disagree?
    I'll try and make this short since Yahoo doesn't give very many characters.

    I'm 16 & I've had irregular periods for 2 yrs. I would go 5 months at a time without a period & my mom begged me to go to the doctors but I refused. I instead researched & discovered PCOS. I have most of the symptoms. Excess hair on my stomach, face, and back, Irregular periods, I'm very overweight, Thick dark skin around my neck and underarms.

    Finally the past year I went to the doctors & I was sent for blood work. Everything came back fine except my testosterone level is elevated. After this I had a CT scan on my ovaries but there is no cysts. My doctor said I don't have PCOS & I'm fine. But I'm convinced that I have it & that I have enough physical symptoms to be treated for PCOS?

    Should I get a second opinion? In the meantime I'm trying to lose weight but I've been unsuccessful. I'm so frustrated and this is taking a huge emotional toll on me! :(

    Any advice would be much appreciated..

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, get a second opinion.

      Generally speaking I say to get a second opinion for your own peace of mind, also as I know what it can be like trying to get help - I went over a decade and multiple doctors with a severe menstrual health problem, then one day a new doctor mentioned a medication like it was an obvious solution, going into women's health I learned it was obvious but the previous doctors just hadn't mentioned it.

      Many of the symptoms of PCOS can be confused with perfectly normal puberty symptoms such as irregular periods, acne, weight gain, and body hair. However that's not to say that you don't have PCOS, the CT scan confirms no cysts but that doesn't necessarily rule out PCOS, you could be diagnosed with PCOS based on the elevated testosterone and the infrequency in which you ovulate.

      I would say to be careful when moving forward, there is no cure for PCOS also a common treatment is hormonal birth control - this can ease symptoms like acne and will give you a regular bleed (although this is not menstruation), however there are other treatment options and often the pill is prescribed due to doctors ignorance of treatments or because they get paid for prescribing such medications. It's vitally important you do your own research on PCOS, I also recommend looking into issues of over-prescribing hormonal birth control (I recommend reading the new book by Holly Grigg-Spall).

      On weight loss you may want to consider low-carb - weight loss and lifestyle changes can improve PCOS significantly, as PCOS is related to insulin production a low-carb diet can significantly improve the condition by regulating insulin. Low-carb is also generally a great way to lose weight because you see results quickly, you don't feel deprived as you would on other diets, it's healthy, and long-term it's much easier to maintain low-carb as a lifestyle choice to prevent yo-yo dieting or re-gaining weight. I also suggest looking at other natural PCOS treatment while you're waiting to find a doctor to take your problems seriously, herbal treatments and lifestyle changes can work very well for PCOS.

  28. QUESTION:
    PCOS question...negative test but all the symptoms?
    a few yrs ago i was tested for PCOS after yrs of missed periods but it was negative. im in my mid thirties and the MOST regular ive ever been in my life is 2 periods a year, sometimes i went 2 yrs without. i had my first 2 children young, both unplanned so no problem with fertility. i had twins 6 months ago and no period yet even though im not breastfeeding or on the pill. before i conceived the twins (planned this time and took no effort to conceive) i hadnt had a period in 6 months, had acne, excessive facial hair, and uncontrollable weight gain despite constant exercise and calorie counting. since the twins the symptoms are back and this time im gaining weight beyond belief. despite the fact that im always on the go and eat like a sparrow because im exhausted and have no appetite. ive spoken to my doc but she says to wait a while and give my hormones a chance to balance after the pregnancy. but soon im gonna ask for another test and try to get to the bottom of it. just wondering if any of you tested negative for PCOS despite having the symptoms. are there other ways to test for it apart from blood sample? i dont want to take the pill since it really messed me up the last time i took it. this sure sounds like PCOS doesnt it?

    • ANSWER:
      I have not had this occur as far as the PCOS but sometimes tests can be negative for several times over the years and then the tests show the positive result later (this an example only but this can happen with other tests before). I have had this happen with testing but from the other end of the spectrum (a false positive).

      I would recommend a consultation with an endocrinologist (a doctor that diagnoses and treats diseases and disorders relating to hormones) just to see what they say if you haven't already.

      As for treatments for PCOS, the pill is not the only option. Some women use natural treatments like herbs, and others use Glucophage to help with treating it because some of them also have a condition called Insulin Resistance.

      As for testing for PCOS, it's a series of blood tests and such to rule out more serious things like Diabetes. There is another condition that is similar to PCOS that can cause some of the same symptoms. The condition is called Nonclassic Adrenal Hyperplasia. The difference between this condition and PCOS is that the testosterone levels that are high are in the adrenal glands and not in the ovaries.

      I also have the link to a site that can tell more about PCOS. If interested please e-mail me off site with the subject line: "PCOS link" so that I will know what it's in regards to.

  29. QUESTION:
    Can acne go away all by itself?
    That is, without any cosmetic or medical treatments?

    • ANSWER:
      If its age related it will go away, but unless is very mild and superficial I do not recommend for you to wait.
      Many types of prolonged acne leave permanent scars. Most of the times acne happens due to an hormonal imbalance that should be address soon. If acne was as normal and common as many people want to make you think, it would happen to most if not all teenagers/adolescents.

      If you are a female and do not have the means to go to a specialist, I do recommend using natural treatments as drinking mint (spearmint) tea twice a day for 5 days after the last day of your period.
      If you are a male do not do the tea treatment!!

      If you can go to a specialist, do not waste your time with a dermatologist (treatments with creams etc do not cure only cover the problem), go straight to an endocrinologist or in the case of females, go to the gynecologist to check if is possible that you have something called PCOS.
      Also avoid Roaccutan which is a pill strong treatment for acne. It has many bad side effects.

      Hope this helps.

  30. QUESTION:
    My dermatologist didn't do anything about my acne??
    I have reallly severe acne, all over my face. I went to see a dermatologist today. He said he was going to prescribe Accutane. I had heard about the side effects of Accutane and was already against it. My regular doctor even asked if I would like to try Accutane but I refused. Out of desperation, I almost agreed until I discovered I would have to have regular blood tests!!! I decided that I could not do that, and refused to use Accutane. The dermatologist didnt do anything else. My mom and I left, and I still don't have a solution for my severe acne, that Ive had for three years. Im 15 and I cant live my life like this. Any solutions>
    Pro Activ didnt work for me..
    Maybe if anyone has any tips on how to cover up severe acne. Im currently using the Neutrogena skin clearing foundation, but it totally didnt work out. The redness is kinda gone, but the bumps are everywhere!!!!! :(

    • ANSWER:
      The problem is that your dermatologist is wanting to treat the symptoms and not the "root cause" most likely because he doesn't know what the root cause is. It is very typical for these guys to give you birth control pills or Accutane or some other drug to try and treat the symptoms. All this does is make you dependent upon the drugs and your body suffers because what is causing the problem is still there.

      I cannot believe Accutane is even on the market and for doctors to prescribe this dangerous junk is ludicrous. The so called "side effects" are horrendous. Thalidamide was an FDA approved drug that caused babies to be born with no arms, etc. Women took it thinking it was good for them. This garbage reminds me of that drug. Accutane is a form of synthetic vitamin A. It reduces the amount of oil released by oil glands in your skin.

      Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Even one dose of Accutane can cause major birth defects of the baby's ears, eyes, face, skull, heart, and brain. They tell you to never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

      Women of child-bearing potential must agree in writing to use two specific forms of birth control and have regular pregnancy tests before, during, and after taking Accutane. These guys want you to get blood tests on a regular basis to make sure this junk is not causing you harmful effects. They want to test your liver as well and warn you not to miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. Unbelievable.

      Do you actually believe that this garbage won't harm your body? I'm surprised they don't tell you that you should have your skin removed and replace it with plastic. That would fix your problem or let's see, let's just pour acid all over you and that will take the acne away. The logic of this whole Accutane thing is just incredible.

      I think what you have here is a bunch of educated bozos that want to treat your symptoms and they have no clue what is causing the problem, so they are reaching into their bag of drug tricks to find anything to be able to charge you money, no matter what it does to you, health wise.

      With Acne, there is a proven link to disordered intestinal bacterial ecology (often due to intestinal infection); poor diet exacerbates this condition (especially sugar, fried foods, hydrogenated oils). If you were not breast fed, you will have a slower response to treatments. Another potential reason for severe acne is PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome). This affects about 1 million women in the U.S. each year. When you have this issue, you will also be getting the effects of a lot of testosterone (hair growth in areas that normally don't get hair, etc.). If this is the case, it takes about 3 weeks of taking natural products to change this situation and the acne goes away. If you have taken antibiotics as a child, just one pill will destroy your intestinal flora and this is 3/4 of your immune system. Eating bad oils, like Soybean, Canola, Cottonseed, and Corn oils can wreak havoc with your body, especially if they are hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated. Because these oils are rancid when you buy them and they go rancid just from your body temperature when you eat them, they cause lots of problems with your intestines and generate toxic effects in the body.

      There are specific protocols in nutrition that can make your body healthy for these conditions. To truly get to the "root cause" of the problem, it's important that you be tested to determine where infections are in your body, specifically. Once you identify these sites, you can address them appropriately.

      The body has an innate ability to heal and it strives to be healthy, not sick. When problems like this happen, it is generally due to nutritional deficiencies. I've never found a single person that has been deficient in drugs.

      I suggest you find a good Certified Nutritional Therapist that knows how to do QRA testing. Get to the "root cause" of this problem and become healthy, not look for a symptom fix.

      good luck to you

  31. QUESTION:
    i was misdiagnosed about pcos?
    i was told 7 months ago i had pcos and now i found out i dont that i have cysts on both ovaries but i have alot of sighns of having it i have brown patches on my neck and one skin tag on my armpit and and carry alot of weight round my tummy and have a little body acne and thinning hair and a little facial and back hair a no period but my hormons and insalin and stuff is normal and tyroid is too all they found was i had a fatty liver and than they found out i had a hiatal hernia could those 2 things cause pains in my sides and under my breasts? can someone help me or give advise without rude comments thanxs also if anyone carrys alot of weight around there waste any style tips thanks

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) is a hormonal disorder which affects 1 in 10 women in the United States alone. If left untreated it will increase the risks for high blood pressure, diabetes and even heart disease. This is caused "by the overstimulating effects of excessive luteinizing hormone (LH), a pituitary gland hormone. Women with PCOS are genetically insensitive to insulin." What do I know, well I was diagnosed with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) when I was 17 years old. From experience, I can tell you that the brown patches, skin tags, excess weight around the abdomen area and hirtuism (hair all over the body) are pretty common symptoms. Now, you say that the physicians found your hormones and insulin levels within normal range, but I think this certainly contradicts the common symptoms mentioned earlier. A fatty liver can also be a sign of PCOS, if I'm not mistaken. Considering the fact that my mother has a hiatal hernia which hurts her at given times it could be possible that this may cause you some degree of pain as well as with a fatty liver. I strongly advise you to get a second opinion from a certified endocrinologist. This is your health you're dealing with and I would strongly encourage you to seek out proper medical care. I'll warn you though most of these physicians will prescribe a combination of birth control pills to regulate monthly periods, lessen acne and control the excess androgens for less hair along with Metforin, a medication used for diabetics to control blood sugar levels, but don't be fooled-- these medications only mask the symptoms and in the long run makes the condition worse. I recommend you seek out natural alternatives to these medications if you are currently taking them or if they are prescribed to you later on. I've read that "banaba leaf (Lagerstroemia speciosa) when taken at 16 to 48 mg doses per day helps lower insulin, blood sugar levels and reduces fat accumulation" because it contains the active ingredient corosolic acid. Just don't take if you are pregnant, nursing and its definitely not for children. Exercising also helps keep blood sugar in check, so try to do some form of moderate activity each day. Carbohydrates are a no-no and I'll tell you why-- carbohydrates convert into sugar (i.e. white rice, white flour, white bread, etc.) and this is not good for people with PCOS! Limit your consumption to complex carbs instead such as whole wheat bread, but try not to eat too much carbs as a nuritional diet plan based around high quality protein is essential. Today, I am now 19 and have since become a vegetarian which I find has ease the severity of menstrual cramps--eating plenty of soy products such as tofu or soy milk to name a few helps. Actually reducing your consumption of meat products will help you as long as you replace it with nutritious foods like beans, nuts and dark leafy greens. I truly hope this information has helped you in some way or form, but remember first you must get that second opinion in order to know how to proceed rightly on the matter! Be patient and take it one day at a time-- wish you the best in your journey...

      Emily

      P.S. If you are interested in becoming a vegetarian please visit The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals' website at www.peta.org where you can get a free vegetarian starter kit, its really easy!

  32. QUESTION:
    Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) hereditary?

    • ANSWER:
      It can run in the family. Whether or not it is genetic is not something I have heard of, but if it is, there still needs to have a trigger that makes the gene express. It may be similarities in diet within the same family could have a connection.

      I have spoken to a woman that told me that her mother and sister have the problem. I was able to give her some advice that worked for her. She told me that after 3 weeks of following the advice, her acne stopped and she wanted to know if I had advice on how to remove the scars. She said her hair was not oily anymore and that see was feeling very good. She sent the information to her mother & sister to help them. PCOS is a degenerative disease and drugs only seem to address the symptoms as they do in most cases.

      her response: "From: D.
      Subject: Hi
      Message: I want to give you an update on my progress, I have been taking the medicines you suggested for a little over two weeks now and I am astounded at the quickness and progress of the results..my acne is completely cleared and my skin is no longer oily, my body and head hair is softer and turned lighter as it once was and I feel so much better..I am so grateful for your help and am wondering just one more thing, what can I do naturally for the acne scars that are left on my face now? they are round and brown. Thank you again.

      D.

      Apparently this affliction affects over 1,000,000 women in the U.S.

      PCOS problem can relate to how your body processes insulin. This can cause issues with your weight.

      PCOS is relatively easy to fix. The doctors really do not understand nutrition and so they resort to drugs and this is just not the way to fix this problem.

      This condition creates a high testosterone level in the body and causes severe acne that typical treatments do not fix, problems relating to excess hair growth, and a lot of people with this problem develop type II diabetes. 80% of type II diabetes is caused by a nano bacteria called "nano bacter" that develops because the body doesn't produce enough hydrochloric acid to kill the bacteria in your stomach. The same bacteria causes heart disease and kidney failure. The 50 billion dollars a year Americans spend on Antacids is a crime. The drug companies should be sent to prisons in a 3rd world country for this farce. These antacids destroy the very acid that will stop the indigestion. Lactic acid from rotting food is the real cause, not stomach acid! The stomach acid stops "acid in digestion."

      There is a natural solution to the issue of PCOS that seems to work in many people.

      A protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. Take 1 or 2 tablets per day for one year. You should be able to get this from your pharmacists.

      Make up a mix of equal parts of peony root (Paeonia lactiflora) and licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and take about 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of this 2 to 3 x per day for a maximum of 6 months. You should give this a break for about 1 week every 4 - 6. weeks.

      You should eliminate sugars, breads, and cereals from the diet. These items cause the body to produce insulin to oxidize the sugars and insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are produced as a result. Elevated insulin levels lead to an excess of male hormones.

      Additionally, if you have ANY scars on the front of your body from your forehead down to your anus, this will cause the cells in the stomach that produce the stomach acid to be subdued and you will not be producing enough acid to kill bacteria or digest your food properly. Additionally, an episiotomy scar can reflex to the ovaries and cause cysts to form like the ones that cause PCOS. PCOS is very common in the U.S. where women typically get these episiotomies when in child birth from physicians that have no clue as to the long term effects of them.

      Once the scar is treated, the cysts typically go away.

      My suggestion is that you go to: www.healthline.cc (not .com) and order the following:

      Betaine HCL --- Take 2 to 4 of these AFTER each meal
      Activator --- Take 1 to 2 AFTER each meal
      Digest --- Take 1 to 2 DURING each meal.
      Probiotic --- Take 1 in the morning and 1 in the evening

      This will improve your digestion greatly. Additionally, you should check yourself for iodine deficiency. This can cause hypothyroidism and is a very common reason people in the U.S. get this. A simple evaluation can be done by you if you paint a golf ball size patch of "tincture of iodine" on your chest. If it is still visible after 24 hours you are NOT deficient. If it goes away in a few hours, you are very deficient. ANY fluoride you put into your body from toothpaste, shower in tap water, drink soda pop, anything that contains fluoride will cause you to become deficient in iodine because the body prefers the fluoride over the iodine. Goiters are not uncommon in children that drink fluoridated water. Get a shower filter, drink bottled water without fluoride, don't drink ANY soda drinks, not only will the soda drinks contain fluoride, but they contain phosphoric acid that binds to your minerals like calcium, magnesium, zinc, etc. and deplete your body of these. If you find yourself deficient, you need to purchase some "Xeno Detox" from the healthline company and take 4 capsules in the morning and 4 in the evening for several months or until the "patch test" works for the 24 hour period.

      Do NOT eat ANY SOY! This also depletes your minerals (especially iron) and slows your thyroid down causing hypothyroidism.

      In regard to any scars you have, you will need to extract the toxins to eliminate the reflexing problem. The ancients did this very effectively with highly energized clay. You can purchase this from the healthline company and they will give you instructions on how to use it. It is painless and only takes a short time to do this procedure and it works. Once you have done this, you won't ever have to do it again.

      I am certain if you follow the above advice, you will be amazed at how quickly you can solve those problems. It takes about 3 weeks, typically to solve the PCOS issue by following the above.

      good luck to you

  33. QUESTION:
    Is my PCOS serious and should i ask for treatment from my doctor?! if you have it pls help?
    I got diagnosed with Polycyctic Ovarian Syndrome about 6 months when i was 16. My doctor did a blood test and said my testosterone level was a bit higher than normal and everything else seemed to be fine. I have done some online research on the symptoms but i don't seem to be exhibit many of them. My symptoms include:
    -VERY irregular periods. Sometimes i don't get any for more than 6 months.
    -A little bit of excess hair on my stomach and chest.
    -minor acne

    I am not overweight or diabetic.
    I was prescribed Progesterone but took it for the 10 days prescribed and haven't taken it since because my doctor said as long as i get 2 periods per year i should be fine. But why do i feel like it is not normal and that i should be getting more treatment? Especially after reading online that PCOS can lead to other major problems such as weight gain and diabetes later on in life?!

    If i ate no red meat or dairy/eggs would that be enough treatment? And should i take Provera or progesterone? Whats the difference? I'm so confused.
    ALSO. I want to have kids later on in life and how will PCOS affect it? I know that many women are able to get pregnant with pills and fertility treatments but how hard is it to conceive naturally? And if i have PCOS does it mean i can have sex without a condom and not worry about getting pregnant??

    • ANSWER:
      In order for a doctor to treat you as part of his "standard of care" practice, he must first diagnose a problem before he can recommend drugs or surgery. You may or may not have the problem as diagnosed, but I think it is not a problem to assume you have it and go from there. If you address the problem from a nutritional point of view, you will be building health, not damaging your body with drugs.

      Please, do yourself a huge favor and deal with the PCOS problem in a nutritional way and solve the problem. Doctors use drugs and surgery as their solution to issues like this and all that does is give you "make believe health."

      "Normalizing" hormones by simply giving you synthetic hormone pills violates the basic principle of healing. Instead, whenever possible, you should strive to normalize the hormones on your own. In your case, by changing your diet, you can start on the road to healing.

      The reason why changing to a diet based on the principles of "Nourishing Traditions," a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, "The Schwarzbein Principle" which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, "Nourishing Traditions," along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients which have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis--the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs.

      The final nutritional therapy recommendation is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct dosages, which were also indicated in these studies. I use the Mediherb extracts and recommend taking 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually recommend using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks."

      The last girl I suggested this too, had complete change in acne production, her hair became normal, and she lost her oily skin in 3 weeks. Her next concern was to ask me how to get rid of the acne scars from the PCOS she had suffered with for several years. She said doctors were no help to her and she was at her wits end.

      Birth control and other synthetic hormone pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you the "make believe health" and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works. Nutrition nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it like drugs do.

      This solution is not expensive, by the way, and you should see results in a few weeks.

      good luck to you

  34. QUESTION:
    whats wrong with me? thyroid? pcos?
    ok so i have all the symptoms of PCOS like acne, gaining weight, irregular periods and even getting hairy :0 i know i just want to cry :( anyway i got my ovaries checked and my hormones checked and it all came out totally normal.
    What else can be causing this? thyroid maybe?

    • ANSWER:
      YES, all the symptoms that you mentioned could come from underactive thyroid - hypothyroidism.

      You should see your doctor and ask for the following blood tests: TSH, FT4, FT3 and most importantly anti-thyroid antibodies.
      Only they can reveal if you have a problem with your thyroid, like Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
      Normal TSH is 0.3-3. (Some doctors still use the out-dated reference range of 0.5-5.5)
      Some doctors are very misinformed and not knowledgeable about thyroid conditions.

      See the symptoms below:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothyroidism/ds00353/dsection=symptoms
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=symptoms
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

      Treatment includes thyroid hormone replacement, such as Synthroid or natural Armour.

  35. QUESTION:
    natural approach to female facial and body hair removal?
    i have an elevated level of dheas and i am in the process of going through tests for the underlying cause of that. i am 19 years old so there is no way it's menopause or pre-menopause. it could be pcos though.
    either way, i want to know about dietary or lifestyle changes i could make to deal with this issue. i have tried virtually every hair removal method (but i don't have the money for electrolysis or laser hair removal yet...so i've tried every temporary method), but it hurts a lot and the results last about 24 hours. i'm not exaggerating. this is where i have excess hair:
    -face (particularly jaw line, lower cheeks, mustache, and lower chin)
    -abdomen (very heavy on stomach right below belly button but stretches all the way up to between my boobs (it's very light colored up there, though, so actually barely noticeable)
    -pubic mound (picture tan lines from a bikini...the hair goes outside of the white part)
    -my bikini line stretches down most of my tight
    -arms (very heavy on forearms but also goes to upper arms)
    -fingers/hands
    -toes/feet

    are there any supplements i could take to help this? what about certain foods that help? and certain foods that make it worse? the same goes for drinks. also, as far as my facial hair, is there any ingredients in makeup i could be using that could make it worse? or ingredients in lotion or body wash that could be making my body hair worse?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's how to shave your pubes: If you can afford to get the no-no hair remover on TV that's the best way. If not then 1st pluck/wax some of them while they're long. Cut the hairs short. Apply shaving cream or conditioner to the pubic area. Then shave upwards in the opposite direction of the hairs with a 5-bladed razor. Be sure to shave hard to make it smooth. Afterwords to avoid getting beginners side effects wash the area off with acne cleanser, dishwasher soap, or rubbing alcohol. It only takes me 5 minutes to shave that & I shave about 3x a week. If done right you will be incredibly smooth like me. If you do experience beginners side effects don't panic! just put acne cream on the bumps, pop them if you can, keep up the shaving routine, & they should go away within a month. That's just a reaction cause your body isnt used to being hairless there. Even I itched & burned when I 1st started. Also try rubbing one of those skin moisturizing bar soaps on the area after you shave it. That'll make it really soft. Also when my facial razor gets dull I switch it to my body razor.

      You can also get it removed permanently with electrolysis which is painful & costs an hour. I've gotten 3 treatments on mine. Email me for more info about it.

      Here's the benefits of hair removal: The absence of it is erotic, sensational, & it's easier to sexually relieve yourself. You'll feel sexier, younger, & cleaner. For girls it makes their periods easier to clean up because the hair traps in blood. It's cleaner because hair traps in odors & dirt & is 1 less thing to wash when you take a shower. One of the reasons I started shaving is because I would kill time twirling the hairs when I saw that area. Pubes can get caught in stuff like your zipper. & you won't leave long gross hairs on stuff like toilets. The only real con is that it takes time & maintance. But then alot of hairy people spend that time doing other worthless stuff like smoking.

      I've got a blog posted on my profile about why there's nothing wrong with pubic hair removal (or body hair removal on either sex) that you & everybody else should read. & fyi you don't need to be sexually active to shave that area. I have friends that are complete prudes that are into body hair removal.

      I hope I am helping people by answering these questions. If you don't wanna pick my answer as best at least let me know if my advice has helped you.

  36. QUESTION:
    How to treat recurring hair loss, acne in a person with pcod and family history of cancer?
    Hello,
    I am a 20 year old girl diagnosed with pcod a year back. All my hormonal levels were fine back then only prolactin was slightly high which the doc said I didnt need to worry about much. I suffered from acne at that time as well and had skipped 2 menstrual cycles. A few months before the diagnosis, my hair volume had decreased drastically. I suffered from tremendous hair loss. Initially I had thick, straight hair with a lot of volume but now it has become incredibly thin and brittle. I still suffer from hair loss. I got treatment done for pcod (glycomet 500mg, ovacare forte for 1 year), acne (4 months of tretiva 10 mg, some topical creams and 15 day antibiotic course each month) and hair ( 2 months minoxidil 5% then next 2 months 2%, 4 months dietary supplements and one month biotin). I got this treatment for acne n hair from jan-april 2013. My hair fall stopped and acne cleared up completely. Again after 2 months, from june onwards, hairfall began and terrible acne started popping on my cheeks n chin and later spread onto my nose forehead. These started as huge painful red bumps underneath my skin. Each acne took at least 2-3 weeks to go away. I didn't want to start on Tretiva all over again cause it has many side effects including hair fall. I can't hav contraceptive pills cause of family cancer history. So I sought natural home remedies n none of them worked for me. I visited another dermatologist. She diagnosed me with female pattern thinning which caused a great deal of sadness to me. My dad went bald at the age of 26 and thinking about me losing my hair and getting bald spots just made me terribly upset. I went to another dermatologist for consult n he said I don't hav anything like that but I was still losing hair. He told me to apply foltene solution to my hair which I did for 2 months and that reduced my hair fall to some extent but upo

    • ANSWER:
      Hey why you are worried so much.. with the help of ayurveda ( Safe and natural treatment ) your all problems hair fall, acne including PCOS problem easily curable.

      i suggest you consult with Arogyam pure herbs consultant in detail for your problem. It really helps you.

      Gd lk

  37. QUESTION:
    Polycystic ovarian syndrome, diet for PCOS and trying to get pregnant. Please help?
    My doctor put me on Metformin ER 500mg. I have to take once a day. I am also taking multi vitamin tablets. She said she would put me on Clomid when I loose a little weight, Yes I am over weight. Maybe someone out there could help me find a good diet for PCOS? I wan to know also is this all good what my doctor doing should I have a different treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      OMG, Metaformin? What are these guys thinking. Well, let's see, let's stabilize the blood sugar with a drug. Please understand that doctors have no clue what they are doing in the field of nutrition because they have NO training in that field whatsoever.

      Please, do yourself a huge favor and deal with the PCOS problem in a nutritional way and solve the problem. Doctors use drugs and surgery as their solution to issues like this and all that does is give you "make believe health."

      "Normalizing" hormones by simply giving you synthetic hormone pills violates the basic principle of healing. Instead, whenever possible, you should strive to normalize the hormones on your own. In your case, by changing your diet, you can start on the road to healing.

      The reason why changing to a diet based on the principles of "Nourishing Traditions," a book by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. is the first step in the therapy of PCOS. Your ovaries need the animal fats, and yes, even the cholesterol found in food in order to make estrogen and progesterone, the correct female hormones.

      Swollen ovaries is a condition analogous to goiter, when the thyroid swells in response to iodine deficiency. Goiters often also result in a hormonal imbalance leading to hypothyroidism. In the case of PCOS, the starvation of the ovaries causes them to become cystic, swollen and eventually unable to regulate the synthesis of their hormones.

      The other main dietary trigger for this imbalance is that when the proper dietary fats are missing, they are inevitably replaced by excessive carbohydrate consumption. This results in excessive insulin production, weight gain, abdominal bloating, and eventually will itself cause hormonal shifts. The biochemistry of this process is well described in the book, "The Schwarzbein Principle" which also suggests a diet based on the principles in the book, "Nourishing Traditions," along with a restriction to about 75 grams of carbohydrates per day. More good fats and fewer carbohydrate foods should help in restoring your hormones to their proper balance.

      In addition to the dietary program, there are many natural nutrients that I have been shown in the medical literature to help PCOS. The first is the protomorphogen extract from Standard Process called Symplex F. This is a mixture of specially processed glandular extracts from the four organs that make up the so-called pituitary axis--the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal glands and the ovaries. We now know that these glands compensate for each other, and that they all get ill as a group. I usually recommend taking 1-2 tablets per day for one whole year to help normalize the function of these important organs. You should be able to get the Symplex F from your local pharmacy.

      The final therapy that I recommend for PCOS is a 50/50 mixture of the herbal extracts of Peony lactiflora and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (commonly known as licorice). There have been three studies in the literature showing that this combination of herbs can result in a complete remission in PCOS, and that it does so by normalizing adrenal function and reducing testosterone levels. It is important to use the correct amounts that were also indicated in these studies. I recommend the Mediherb extracts and suggest 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the mixture, 2-3 times per day. I usually suggest using this mixture for six months with breaks of a week or two every 4-6 weeks."

      The last girl I suggested this too, had complete change in acne production, her hair became normal, and she lost her oily skin in 3 weeks. Her next concern was to ask me how to get rid of the acne scars from the PCOS she had suffered with for several years. She said doctors were no help to her and she was at her wits end.

      Birth control pills are the worst way to deal with PCOS. All that does is give you the "make believe health" and demonstrating very clearly that doctors have NO clue about what they are doing in regard to nutrition and how the body works in regard to nutrition that nourishes the body and does NOT abuse it with drugs.

      This solution is not expensive, by the way, and you should see results in a few weeks.

      good luck to you

  38. QUESTION:
    Is high male hormones and PCOS the same thing? Can you conceive with high male hormones?
    I was told by my OBGYN that i have high male hormones (as a reason why i have irregular period). I was a bit shock so just walked out as soon as i had a chance. Later on and searched it and i found myself reading about PCOS so i figure that's what she meant. I been having a lot of sex, unprotected sex since according to what i read about PCOS its impossible to get pregnant without getting any treatment . . . So I'm wondering if PCOS and High Hormones are the same thing? Can you conceive with with high male hormones?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have PCOS and all my bloodwork has come back fairly normal. There are a lot of other symptoms that are considered when diagnosing PCOS. That is the reason its a syndrome instead of a disease- not every woman who has PCOS will have the same symptoms. And you don't need to have all the symptoms, you don't even need to have polycystic ovaries to have it. Do you have male pattern baldness or hirsutism, some form of insulin resistance, infertility, acne, dark patches of skin on your neck, knees or elbows, skin tags, weight gain- especially in the midsection? Those are some of the main symptoms of PCOS. If all you have are the elevated hormones, it's more likely that that is it, just elevated hormones.

      Its also possible to conceive with PCOS, even naturally. Admittedly, a lot of women with it do need fertility drugs or ART, but it isn't impossible. My first pregnancy was entirely natural; I didn't use any drugs or any medical assistance of any kind.

  39. QUESTION:
    Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.....?
    need some advice on what has worked for others. Doc's want to give birth control as treatment. is this effective? any natural treatments ?

    • ANSWER:
      The pill is effective at helping to control things like acne which can occur with PCOS and the irregular periods. Some women have gone the dietary route to help with PCOS as well and other alternatives on the natural front.

      There is a site that has a list for women that want to do natural treatments. If you would like the link to the site that has that list please e-mail or IM me off site any time.

  40. QUESTION:
    what can I do to lower my androgen levels?
    I have PCOS and I would like to know some natural ways to help regulate hormones, and with the acne, etc..

    • ANSWER:
      I too have PCOS and it is AWEFUL... its hard to loose weight and the acne is terrible too. Odds are good you have maybe been to a endocrinologist? I went to a regular one and a reproductive endocrinologist and was told that the medication spironalactone would be a good treatment drug to help with the acne and any extra hair that might be a problem. It seems to keep the acne at bey most times but I still get small break outs close to my period and such. As far as natural ways go... its all in your diet really.. and its tough. The doctor recommended the South Beach Diet, Sugar Busters, and a no white at night policy as well as to take a multivitamin and a double strength fish oil daily. I hope this helps.

  41. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a natural alternative to spironolactone for pcos?
    I have elevated androgens, acne, mild hair loss, excess body hair. My weight is perfect though. I also have mild hypoglycemia due to insulin issues.

    I HATE DRUGS. Has anyone found an alternative to spiro? One of my holistic docs (the endocrinolist one) is suggesting spiro and metformin.

    Yes, drugs have plants in them. But they also have toxic man made ingredients.

    • ANSWER:
      You are very, very wise to try to avoid pharmaceutical drugs if at all possible. Yes, there are alternatives to spironolactone and metformin in the treatment of PCOS. Natural treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome is multifactorial. You should see a qualified naturopath for specific herbal remedies and diet recommendations, but the basics are below.

      Lifestyle. Exercise and weight reduction have been shown to be highly beneficial in the treatment of PCOS and its symptoms. Exercise can helps reduce weight, regulate menstrual cycles, and reduce risk factors for diabetes and heart disease which are associated with PCOS.

      PCOS Diet. Women with PCOS respond well to a low glycemic index, low simple carbohydrate, low animal product, high fiber diet which helps reduce weight, regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and reduce inflammatory prostaglandins.

      Nutritional Therapy. Depending on your specific presentation of PCOS, there are a variety of nutritional therapies which will be considered. Nutritional therapies can help to regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, reduce circulating androgens, improve ovarian function, improve fertility, reduce risk of heart disease, and support liver detoxification of estrogens.

      Herbal Therapy. Depending on your symptoms of PCOS, a variety of herbal therapies may be considered. The goal of herbal medicine might include: reducing circulating androgens, optimizing ovarian function, and supporting optimal endocrine function.

      By the way, just to let you know why you are so wise to avoid spirolactone: Even though the drug that your endicrinoligist is suggesting has been shown to be effective in hormone-induced acne it has various unpleasant side effects. Spironolactone is a diuretic [it causes you to pee a lot]. The side effects in low-dose spirolactone are:

      irregular menstrual cycle [most common]
      breast tenderness [most common]
      thirst, dry mouth
      stomach cramps, vomiting, and/or diarrhea
      headache
      dizziness
      increased blood potassium levels
      low blood pressure

      Both blood potassium levels and blood pressure should be checked periodically while you're taking this medication. Also, you shouldn't get pregnant while using spironolactone. And spironolactone isn't a good choice for you if you have kidney problems, or a history (or family history) of breast cancer, uterine cancer, or ovarian cancer. According to the National Institutes of Health, spironolactone is known to have caused tumors in lab animals.

      Metformin is also much less desirable than the low Glycemic Index diet that is recommended for PCOS patients. Its side effects include:

      MALAISE.
      GI DISTURBANCE.
      VITAMIN B12 MALABSORPTION.
      ELEVATED HOMOCYSTEINE
      PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS.
      ANEMIA.LIVER OR KIDNEY PROBLEMS.
      MULTIPLE MEDICATIONS. You may be at risk for health problems or symptoms if you take metformin in addition to other medications.
      HAIR LOSS.
      LACTIC ACIDOSIS.
      BILE ABNORMALITIES.

  42. QUESTION:
    Can someone tell me the symptoms of PCOS and what treatments there are available for someone wanting children?
    My sister in law just had a scope and removal of some spots of endometriosis that they weren't aware of until the scope. The results of the additional testing came back and she's been told she can't have children without some sort of hormonal interventions, so she's being told she has a lot more problems than just the endometriosis.

    The doctor is having her do one blood test per month for the next few months so they can determine what sort of therapy she should go on.

    I've been doing some reading on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Based on what I've read, all the symptoms seem to fit with what my SIL has been dealing with for years...oily skin and acne, obesity, excessive hair growth, skin discolorations...she always just shrugged all those things off as being genetic factors that she could never fix (after trying to fix each thing individually to no success). Also, random periods that only come a few times a year.

    So my thought is, are these symptoms correct? And if she has these symptoms and they ARE indicative of PCOS, what tests should the doctor be doing to properly diagnose her? She's very upset that she is being lead to believe she can't have children.
    And she said the doctor never mentioned PCOS or anything else as being a possiblity, just vaguely mentioned "hormone treatments once the diagnosis is made".

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately she has every classic symptom of pcos, combined with endometriosis it won't be easy. They need to be seriously proactive if they want to conceive.
      Your a great sil, she'll have to lose weight, have a look at soulcysters.com/org for natural diets condusive to losing weight with this condition.

      There are numerous treatments, metaformin initially and thenin combinationn with clomid would help hugely.

      Hope she listens to you, difficult subject to discuss.. very best of luck.

  43. QUESTION:
    PCOS why does my doctor have me on birth control?
    I was recently diagnosed with PCOS.. I am 40 pounds over weight which I am well aware doesn't help with the problem, I am in my early 20's, and I am not ready for kids.. my OB/GYN put me on birth control pills, she said it could help me lose weight (which please let me know if you've been able to lose weight on birth control with PCOS), will help with hormonal acne, and regulate my period..which all sounds wonderful but isn't it just hiding the fact that I am living with PCOS, shouldn't I be on metaformin, clomid, prometrium, perhaps helping mend the problem or am I wrong?

    • ANSWER:
      You are quite right, but suppressing your hormones and menstrual cycles it is hiding the problem by masking the symptoms such as irregular periods, weight issues, acne and body hair - for the record it doesn't regulate your period, it gives you a regular withdrawal bleed. There are arguments for and against using hormonal birth control as a treatment for PCOS, obviously getting rid of the nasty symptoms and causing a regular vaginal bleed are beneficial, but the condition itself is not being treated.

      There is no cure for PCOS, it's just treatment. The medications you mention are used to trigger regular ovulation, normally only used when women are looking to get pregnant, in theory it is treating the problem more than birth control would, however it's still only dealing with symptoms rather than treating the underlying condition. Generally speaking PCOS comes down to issues with hormone irregularity and insulin issues so regulating hormones and dietary changes will help with PCOS, but again it's a case of trying to right something that has no known cure. Do the research to see what options are available to you (and don't discount natural or alternative treatment options) and then consult with your doctor.

      The fact you recognise that the pill will just hide the problem is far more revolutionary than you probably realise! Hormonal birth control is prescribed for...well...everything. There is a hell of a complex history and sociological cometary behind this, but essentially when it comes down to why doctors prescribe the pill for reasons other than birth control there are various not-so-great reasons. Including; doctors being lazy or lacking in knowledge to educate women of their options, marketing encourages women to use birth control in this way, and doctors are paid a lot of money to promote medications. Hormonal birth control is awesome, but there are some serious issues in how it is currently used within medicine.

  44. QUESTION:
    What are some natural remedies for lack or imbalance b/w hormones?
    I think I have an imbalance of androgen and estrogen in my body. My periods are very scant (shows up once in 3 months) and I have been progressively gaining weight despite exercising and eating healthier than be4. I also have acne which is not due to the use of products. I went to the gyno and he just pushed BC pills on me without even hearing me out. I have another appnt with another gyn which is like 3 months away. I read that excess androgens can be the cause of my problems. Are there any natural remedies to "fix" this? I am not reely interested in taking artificial hormone pills. I may be very wrong in my self-diagnosis; so plz help me out here.
    Thnx
    Thanks Camelia,
    Yeah I got my thyroid checked but it has been a month and the doctor hasnt called back; which under normal circumstances might mean that I am ok. But I am gonna call and ask for the results since u say their values are outdated. Thnx again for the answer!
    Just so u know, other than these symtoms, I feel healthy for the most part. I sleep well and my digestion is quite good.

    • ANSWER:
      I think you should try a gluten free diet. Amenorrhea and weight gain are both symptoms of celiac disease and pcos. Celiac disease is a gluten intolerance and lots of people with pcos respond well to gluten free diets. Both are extremely common, so the chances of you having one of these two conditions are good. It is possible that you have excess androgens, but I doubt that this is a primary condition. I think it is a symptom of something else. The gluten free diet is the first thing you should do.

      The next thing you should do is get your thyroid checked. It causes weight gain and amenorrhea. And have them give you the test results and look them up yourself. Lots of physicians are very unaware of the current recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. A lot of cases are going undiagnosed because they're going off of outdated lab values. Also, a lot of physicians are now recognizing subclinical hypothyroidism, where your lab values are in range, but you still have symptoms.

      I agree with you about the birth control pills. It's like they don't even care what's going on with your body, they just want to mask the symptoms with birth control pills. Even if you're not sick, they try to get you to take them for birth control. It's a little ridiculous. I'm fine with taking medication if it's necessary, but I think they push it without even trying to get to the bottom of it.

      Let me know if you have any questions!

      edit: that's good that you feel healthy. But don't make the mistake of thinking that your health problems couldn't be related to food because you don't have digestive symptoms. Food intolerances don't usually have digestive symptoms, that's why they're so hard to diagnose. They have much more delayed and long term symptoms. Also, I found that, for me, acne is related to gluten a little bit, but dairy and eggs are a big trigger. And you could probably call at this point to get your thyroid results. They get busy and don't call you even when your results got back weeks ago. Annoying! :-)

  45. QUESTION:
    Ladies please help me out...?
    Ok my doctor thinks i might have pcos after i had some blood tests done. Next week i have an appointment with a gyne at the hospital, please could you run me through what he might do? does he just talk first meeting to you or do a scan etc? please help me out as very confused & worried. Thank you
    im in the uk.

    • ANSWER:
      What tests are used to diagnose polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)?
      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. During the physical exam the doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check out the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. Your doctor might want to do a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

      How is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) treated?
      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals. Some treatments for PCOS include:

      Birth control pills. For women who don't want to become pregnant, birth control pills can control menstrual cycles, reduce male hormone levels, and help to clear acne. However, the menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone, like Provera , to control the menstrual cycle and reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. (See Does polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) put women at risk for other health problems?) But progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

      Diabetes medications. The medicine metformin (Glucophage ) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It also has been found to help with PCOS symptoms, although it is not FDA-approved for this use. Metformin affects the way insulin controls blood glucose (sugar) and lowers testosterone production. Abnormal hair growth will slow down, and ovulation may return after a few months of use. Recent research has shown metformin to have other positive effects, such as decreased body mass and improved cholesterol levels. Metformin will not cause a person to become diabetic.

      Fertility medications. Lack of ovulation is usually the reason for fertility problems in women with PCOS. Several medications that stimulate ovulation can help women with PCOS become pregnant. Even so, other reasons for infertility in both the woman and man should be ruled out before fertility medications are used. Also, there is an increased risk for multiple births (twins, triplets) with fertility medications. For most patients, clomiphene citrate (Clomid , Serophene ) is the first choice therapy to stimulate ovulation. If this fails, metformin taken with clomiphene is usually tried. When metformin is taken along with fertility medications, it may help women with PCOS ovulate on lower doses of medication. Gonadotropins (goe-NAD-oh-troe-pins) also can be used to stimulate ovulation. These are given as shots. But gonadotropins are more expensive and there are greater chances of multiple births compared to clomiphene. Another option is in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF offers the best chance of becoming pregnant in any one cycle and gives doctors better control over the chance of multiple births. But, IVF is very costly.

      Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. Medicines called anti-androgens may reduce hair growth and clear acne. Spironolactone (speer-on-oh-lak-tone) (Aldactone ), first used to treat high blood pressure, has been shown to reduce the impact of male hormones on hair growth in women. Finasteride (Propecia ), a medicine taken by men for hair loss, has the same effect. Anti-androgens often are combined with oral contraceptives.

      Before taking Aldactone , tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed while taking this medicine. Women who may become pregnant should not handle Propecia .

      Vaniqa cream also reduces facial hair in some women. Other treatments such as laser hair removal or electrolysis work well at getting rid of hair in some women. A woman with PCOS can also take hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing.

      Surgery. "Ovarian drilling" is a surgery that brings on ovulation. It is sometimes used when a woman does not respond to fertility medicines. The doctor makes a very small cut above or below the navel and inserts a small tool that acts like a telescope into the abdomen. This is called laparoscopy. The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn't help with loss of scalp hair and increased hair growth on other parts of the body.

      Lifestyle modification. Keeping a healthy weight by eating healthy foods and exercising is another way women can help manage PCOS. Many women with PCOS are overweight or obese. Eat fewer processed foods and foods with added sugars and more whole-grain products, fruits, vegetables, and lean meats to help lower blood sugar (glucose) levels, improve the body's use of insulin, and normalize hormone levels in your body. Even a 10 percent loss in body weight can restore a normal period and make a woman's cycle more regular

  46. QUESTION:
    I might have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?
    I was told that I might have this by my dr. because I only get my period every few months, and he asked me to get some blood tests done to see (I haven't had the tests, because I don't really want to see the results).

    What are the risks of leaving it untreated?

    I was just wondering; if the blood tests confirm that you may have Polycystic Ovaries, what happens then? Are further tests required, and do you need to get medical treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS is notoriously difficult to diagnose. It is a diagnosis of exclusion. In other words, it is important to rule out other diseases that can cause symptoms similar to PCOS (such as Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia). To diagnose PCOS, we use a combination of clinical symptoms (what you experience as the patient, such as excess hair growth, irregular menses, acne, skin tags, weight gain, infertility, etc.) and lab tests.

      The blood tests to consider are:
      - testosterone- elevated in PCOS

      - DHEA-S- elevated in PCOS

      - Fasting insulin- elevated in PCOS. Some doctors may hesitate to order this test because the normal range (0-20) is so wide. However, we find that results greater than 9 indicate insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is usually the underlying cause of PCOS, as you may have read about on our site.

      - Fasting glucose or glucose tolerance test- elevated in PCOS. Using this information in combination with the fasting insulin helps to diagnose insulin resistance. Also, women with PCOS have a higher risk of diabetes so it is important to screen for this early and often.

      - LH: FSH- Some doctors may also look at the ratio between these two hormones. In PCOS, we would expect LH to be elevated in comparison to FSH.

      - You could get an ultrasound to check for the presence of ovarian cysts. Even if the ovaries do appear normal, the absence of ovarian cysts does not mean that you don't have PCOS. Not everyone with PCOS has ovarian cysts.

      - I would also check your cholesterol levels and liver function tests, as these can also be abnormal in PCOS (as well as in many other conditions).

      Lab testing is not mandatory for diagnosing PCOS, especially if you are experiencing so many of the symptoms. However, the above tests do give us numbers which, along with the improvement of your clinical symptoms, help us monitor your progress.

      I do want to let you know that there is another condition called Cushing's disease that has many symptoms of PCOS and is sometimes mistaken for PCOS. If you did have Cushing's disease it may exacerbate the symptoms. Cushing's is not very common, but I still wanted to mention it to you. This would be something to discuss with your doctor to ensure it has been ruled out.

      As for leaving it untreated- I would not suggest this. The long-term consequences of PCOS and its underlying cause, insulin resistance, can be quite severe. Insulin resistance is a serious condition and unfortunately is not widely recognized in allopathic or western medicine as such. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of the following disorders and diseases: heart disease, diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian syndrome, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, and elevated cholesterol levels. So you would be at increased rick for heart attacks, strokes, obesity, infertility, and numerous other things. PCOS is more than just a disorder of the reproductive system- it affects your ENTIRE BODY!!! If you have been diagnosed with insulin resistance reversal of the condition is recommended. Additionally, by not menstruating (getting your period) each month you are at higher risk for endometrial cancer so yes it is important to find a way to manage it.

      If you are interested in natural treatment here is an AWESOME site: www.pcos.insulitelabs.com

  47. QUESTION:
    PCOS in a lean 22 year old girl?
    I am fairly certain that I have PCOS, diagnosed by a dermatologist.

    I have mild hair growth and cystic acne (though its 90% gone away through treatment)

    I am naturally [extremely] strong and athletic...also a generally intense person, naturally waking up at 6-6:30 am every day to run, read, play video games, or leisurely study (in the summer)

    I am a finance student

    I do not go to parties or go to bars or "hang out" because I always feel disappointed that I had wasted time after doing these things, so, I dont do them.

    I am an artist, athlete and student, do not drink or smoke, eat mostly carbohydrates and simple sugars, and I give all of my time to focus hard on my pursuits.

    Ive never had any desire for a relationship or marriage, but for relations.
    I like to be alone with my dog and art and reallllly good food, and have my own way to me, I am content, I prefer phone conversations, but realize that it is not the usual mindset for a 22 year old girl in America.

    I have always had irregular periods, usually they come every 2-3 months and are light. Which is very nice, but I get huuuuuuuuuge hot flashes and will throw up if I don't take medicine within about....3 hours of its onset.

    I also have had odd blood sugar fall-offs, in which Ive collapsed in the bathroom from it one time, and an ambulance was called, they gave me some odd gel to 'bring me back', it took only a few minutes to get me back to normal levels after the gel.

    I run about 3-4 miles a day, and take in around 1500 calories a day

    I am a 5'10 feet tall girl weighing around 146 pounds. I am trying to lose weight, because I enjoy being skinny and wearing skinny jeans.

    I store fat deep in my thighs, and on my lower back. No fat at all on the belly, I have had a natural 4 pack for most of my life there. My veins are always popped out in my arms and on my stomache, to the horror/delight of many boyfriends.

    I was wondering, is this common for a 22 year old? PCOS?
    Am I and the (erm, best) dermatologist in my metropolitan area correct in the uh, diagnosis?

    Will I have trouble losing weight for the rest of my life

    Does anyone have any advice in regards to this condition?

    If you don't think that this is a correct analysis of PCOS, what other....diagnosis would you think I have?

    I appreciate any answers!! Thank You!

    • ANSWER:
      I have to say first and foremost that your rigorous exercise routine can not be done while taking in only 1500 calories. 1500 calories is the type of caloric intake for a dieting person,which at 5'10 and 146 lbs you should not be doing. Also if you're athletic and also lift weights along with your running then you should certainly have a higher caloric intake around 2500-2800. If you don't feel comfortable with a doctor telling you what you should do, please see a nutritionist, as they specialize in caloric intake.

      But yes PCOS can be affecting you, in fact it sounds like it might be the cause of your irregular periods and illness. Your health has no bearing on whether you'd have it or not.

      I suggest seeing your primary care physician to be diagnosed. He will likely ask for your history on menstrual cycles and whether you has acne, hair thinning, irregular periods, etc. He may also conduct a blood test to further certify whether it's PCOS.

  48. QUESTION:
    PC OS Results, what happens next?
    I have been having irregular periods for aslong as i can remember, every other month usually but some times longer some times less. Im 19 in september ive never been pregnant although i have had unprotected sexs many of times with past boyfriends and my present. My sister suffers from pcos and endometriosis she managed to have 4 children before she was diagnosed with endometriosis but she cant have no more, nobody else in our family suffers from it and im not sure her dads side does either (we have the same mums but not dads) today ive gone and had some blood tests done to check if i have pcos i get the results on wednesday afternoon. Im just wondering if they come back negative is there still a possibility that i cant have children, like what if i had a really abnormal uterus or something, or would this still show up in the blood test. Maybe im just worrying to much but i really would like my own family, not just yet although as im having unprotected sex if i did fall pregnant now i would be happy. I knows there other options for having children and stuff i just want to do it all the natural way. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly, you should understand that PCOS is not a disease, rather its a syndrome (which means it describes a pattern of symptoms). In fact there are various sub-types of PCOS with slightly different patterns. Diagnosis is based on the presence of certain symptoms.

      Following on, next you need to be aware that there is no such thing as a "blood test for PCOS". So there is no test to come back "positive" or "negative". The blood tests you are having done will look at your hormone levels, such as estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, LH, FSH, maybe prolactin. Perhaps glucose and insulin too. None of these test results alone can lead to a diagnosis of PCOS. The results might indicate PCOS (eg high testosterone and high LH), but even if the results are normal, it does NOT rule out you having PCOS.

      PCOS does have a genetic factor to it, but it is not as simple as a gene that is passed on. As I said, its not a disease and it is not inherited directly.

      You don't say what other symptoms you have, which is a shame because that's the key thing in diagnosing PCOS. So I know you have irregular periods, and perhaps are not ovulating. But you dont mention your weight or BMI (body mass index). You dont mention whether you have issues with hair growth, or oily skin/acne. Under-developed breasts may be a sign, as can be persistent dandruff. Skin darkening and skin tags are also indicative of insulin-related PCOS.

      On your question about fertility, yes, woman with PCOS have reduced fertility. Which means they may struggle to get pregnant and may need fertility treatment. But many do get pregnant naturally.

      Out of 100 random women (not just women with PCOS) having unprotected intercourse, you would expect 85% to get pregnant and 15% not to get pregnant. Maybe you have just been lucky, or maybe you have fertility issues. I dont know. Follow up with your doctor when you get the results of your tests.

  49. QUESTION:
    What to do if parents dont support my Pcos ( health condition)?
    I am sixteen and have always been overweight. No matter how had I exercised I was still fat. I recently found out i have poly cystic ovarian syndrome which is a hormone imbalance. It is very hard for women with this syndrome to lose Weight. Treatment for this condition is usually an affective drug called metformin. I was so overjoyed to find out that there is a fix to my problem. I was so tired of feeling that I could never overcome my Weight and now thier was finally a way I could! Now here comes the bad part......I asked my parents if i could take this medication and they flat out told me NO. They didn't listen to my story or reasoning they just said NO. They told me that I just wanted a "quick" fix. Which is not true, I have been dieting since I was nine and it never has worked. I ended up putting the conversation on the back burner. Then one day I found out a mom of one of the kids I babysit for have PCOS. We had a long conversation about it and it was a nice heart to heart. She offered to write my mom an email giving her a perspective and more information. My mom was furious and started saying rude things about my employer and even threatened to not let me babysit for their family ever again. It has now been months since I have been diagnosed and my parents are not budging. What makes me angry is that they have not even looked up the medication or done any research to make a proper decision. They also had me take birth control which in my opinion is terrible compared to metformin, it also made me depressed. I am truly at a loss here. I am so sad and angry that my heart breakes. I am tired of people thinking I am fat because I eat twinkies all day which is not the case. I am tired wishing I was skinny. Most of all I am infuriated that my dream of being a skinny girl is so close but my parents are not letting me take it! I wish there was some way of taking the medication without my parents consent! Don't kids have medical rights???!!! Its my body!!! Please help me! I would love some advice.

    • ANSWER:
      Please don't let the ignorance of your parents get to you. They just don't know any better. I assume by their reaction that they don't have much faith in a doctor's diagnosis. That's their right, unfortunately. Honestly, Metformin is only going to work on your insulin resistance. While it may help you lose some weight, that may improve your PCOS symptoms, it will not cure or reverse PCOS. Without actually treating the PCOS, you will continue to have the symptoms related to PCOS like not ovulating or having periods regularly, acne, thinning hair, hair growth in all the wrong places, fertility problems (when you're old enough for that to be a concern), etc. There are a lot of things you can do naturally, without the use of hormones that simply mask PCOS or other medications. Check out the site www.pcos-insulin-resistance.info, they have some info on there but their newsletter has the best info. It's just the website address with /newsletter after it.
      At 16 years of age, you do have your own medical rights but if you don't have your own money to pay for the prescription, you don't really have any options. I wish you all the luck in the world! I suffered with PCOS for over 15 years before finding out there were simple, natural things I could do to reverse it. Once I started doing all those things, I conceived a healthy baby naturally and haven't had any problems since then.

  50. QUESTION:
    Polycystic ovaries?!?
    I have some questions regarding polycystic ovaries. Why do they form? How are they treated? Do they cause infertility? What are the chances of these cysts returning after treatment and Are they typically painful?

    Please only serious answers...no games!

    • ANSWER:
      What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      PCOS is a health problem that can affect a woman s menstrual cycle, fertility, hormones, insulin production, heart, blood vessels, and appearance. Women with PCOS have these characteristics:

      high levels of male hormones, also called androgens
      an irregular or no menstrual cycle
      may or may not have many small cysts in their ovaries. Cysts are fluid-filled sacs.
      PCOS is the most common hormonal reproductive problem in women of childbearing age.

      How many women have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      An estimated five to 10 percent of women of childbearing age have PCOS.

      What causes Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      No one knows the exact cause of PCOS. Women with PCOS frequently have a mother or sister with PCOS. But there is not yet enough evidence to say there is a genetic link to this disorder. Many women with PCOS have a weight problem. So researchers are looking at the relationship between PCOS and the body s ability to make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body s use or for storage. Since some women with PCOS make too much insulin, it s possible that the ovaries react by making too many male hormones, called androgens. This can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and ovulation problems.

      Why do women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have trouble with their menstrual cycle?
      The ovaries are two small organs, one on each side of a woman's uterus. A woman's ovaries have follicles, which are tiny sacs filled with liquid that hold the eggs. These sacs are also called cysts. Each month about 20 eggs start to mature, but usually only one becomes dominant. As the one egg grows, the follicle accumulates fluid in it. When that egg matures, the follicle breaks open to release the egg so it can travel through the fallopian tube for fertilization. When the single egg leaves the follicle, ovulation takes place.

      In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for any of the eggs to fully mature. They may start to grow and accumulate fluid. But no one egg becomes large enough. Instead, some may remain as cysts. Since no egg matures or is released, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman s menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Also, the cysts produce male hormones, which continue to prevent ovulation.

      What are the symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      These are some of the symptoms of PCOS:

      infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
      infertility or inability to get pregnant because of not ovulating
      increased growth of hair on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes
      acne, oily skin, or dandruff
      pelvic pain
      weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
      type 2 diabetes
      high cholesterol
      high blood pressure
      male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
      patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
      skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
      sleep apnea excessive snoring and breathing stops at times while asleep
      What tests are used to diagnose Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?
      There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam possibly including an ultrasound, check your hormone levels, and measure glucose, or sugar levels, in the blood. If you are producing too many male hormones, the doctor will make sure it s from PCOS. At the physical exam the doctor will want to evaluate the areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. During a pelvic exam, the ovaries may be enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. This can be seen more easily by vaginal ultrasound, or screening, to examine the ovaries for cysts and the endometrium. The endometrium is the lining of the uterus. The uterine lining may become thicker if there has not been a regular period.

      How is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) treated?
      Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatments are based on the symptoms each patient is having and whether she wants to conceive or needs contraception. Below are descriptions of treatments used for PCOS.

      Birth control pills. For women who don t want to become pregnant, birth control pills can regulate menstrual cycles, reduce male hormone levels, and help to clear acne. However, the birth control pill does not cure PCOS. The menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone, like Provera, to regulate the menstrual cycle and prevent endometrial problems. But progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

      Diabetes Medications. The medicine, Metformin, also called Glucophage, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes, also helps with PCOS symptoms. Metformin affects the way insulin regulates glucose and decreases the testosterone production. Abnormal hair growth will slow down and ovulation may return after a few months of use. These medications will not cause a person to become diabetic.

      Fertility Medications. The main fertility problem for women with PCOS is the lack of ovulation. Even so, her husband s sperm count should be checked and her tubes checked to make sure they are open before fertility medications are used. Clomiphene (pills) and Gonadotropins (shots) can be used to stimulate the ovary to ovulate. PCOS patients are at increased risk for multiple births when using these medications. In vitro Fertilization (IVF) is sometimes recommended to control the chance of having triplets or more. Metformin can be taken with fertility medications and helps to make PCOS women ovulate on lower doses of medication.

      Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. If a woman is not trying to get pregnant there are some other medicines that may reduce hair growth. Spironolactone is a blood pressure medicine that has been shown to decrease the male hormone s effect on hair. Propecia, a medicine taken by men for hair loss, is another medication that blocks this effect. Both of these medicines can affect the development of a male fetus and should not be taken if pregnancy is possible. Other non-medical treatments such as electrolysis or laser hair removal are effective at getting rid of hair. A woman with PCOS can also take hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing.

      Surgery. Although it is not recommended as the first course of treatment, surgery called ovarian drilling is available to induce ovulation. The doctor makes a very small incision above or below the navel, and inserts a small instrument that acts like a telescope into the abdomen. This is called laparoscopy. The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn't help with increased hair growth and loss of scalp hair.

      A healthy weight. Maintaining a healthy weight is another way women can help manage PCOS. Since obesity is common with PCOS, a healthy diet and physical activity help maintain a healthy weight, which will help the body lower glucose levels, use insulin more efficiently, and may help restore a normal period. Even loss of 10% of her body weight can help make a woman's cycle more regular.

      How does Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) affect a woman while pregnant?
      There appears to be a higher rate of miscarriage, gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, and premature delivery in women with PCOS. Researchers are studying how the medicine, metformin, prevents or reduces the chances of having these problems while pregnant, in addition to looking at how the drug lowers male hormone levels and limits weight gain in women who are obese when they get pregnant.

      No one yet knows if metformin is safe for pregnant women. Because the drug crosses the placenta, doctors are concerned that the baby could be affected by the drug. Research is ongoing.

      Does Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) put women at risk for other conditions?
      Women with PCOS can be at an increased risk for developing several other conditions. Irregular menstrual periods and the absence of ovulation cause women to produce the hormone estrogen, but not the hormone progesterone. Without progesterone, which causes the endometrium to shed each month as a menstrual period, the endometrium becomes thick, which can cause heavy bleeding or irregular bleeding. Eventually, this can lead to endometrial hyperplasia or cancer. Women with PCOS are also at higher risk for diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Getting the symptoms under control at an earlier age may help to reduce this risk.

      Does Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) change at menopause?
      Researchers are looking at how male hormone levels change as women with PCOS grow older. They think that as women reach menopause, ovarian function changes and the menstrual cycle may become more normal. But even with falling male hormone levels, excessive hair growth continues, and male pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause.


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